How to Cut Angles on a Table Saw Using a Taper Guide for Accuracy

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After you’ve learned the basics of how to use a table saw, you’ll want to take advantage of useful jigs that make your table saw even more versatile. For example, have you wondered how to cut angles on a table saw? There’s a jig for that! A taper guide may look tricky to set up but with the technique shown here, setup is not difficult and the resulting cut quality is impressive.

What’s a taper guide?

The taper guide shown in this video has two legs that adjust to the exact angle you need to cut. Most models have a degree mark on one leg, but translating the line you need to cut to the degrees on the taper guide can be vexing. Instead, check out our technique which has you simply measure, adjust and measure again until everything lines up. It can take a little patience, but it certainly isn’t difficult and once you know how to cut angles on a table saw, you’ll be able to take on more complex woodworking projects.

Let’s Get Set Up

Once the taper jig is adjusted properly, it’s time to locate the fence. With the blade up, you’ll position the taper guide against the fence and the board against the taper guide. The taper guide and the board travel together as you make the cut.

Make the Angled Cut

When everything is set, you’ll start the table saw and make the perfect angled cut. The cut quality made using the table saw and taper guide can’t be beat. Knowing how to cut angles on a table saw will enhance your woodworking projects, as will watching any and all of WWGOA’s woodworking videos.

Discussion
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6 Responses to “How to Cut Angles on a Table Saw Using a Taper Guide for Accuracy”
  1. Hans Graveman

    Why don’t you just put the taper guide on top of the board push all against the fence and allaign the taper guide with the pencil line saves a lot of measuring and is so much easier to set up

    Reply
  2. Hans Graveman

    you can make a taper guide from aluminum tubing and a hinge or some board and window hardware

    Reply
    • WWGOA Team

      Hi, Saeid!

      You should use a taper guide that is as long as the work piece so that you can safely support it and maintain the proper angle. If this is not possible, then consider snapping a line and cutting the taper on a bandsaw, then clean up the cut with a hand plan. I normally cut tapers on stock of this length using a band saw because I find it to be safer and less cumbersome. It takes a little time to clean up the cut, but if I only have to cut a few pieces that’s not problem. If I had to cut a bunch of them I’d make a full size jig for the table saw so that I’d get a much cleaner cut.

      Reply
  3. clutions

    What Hans said. Plus, (and I was using this before I learned about using my iGage digital angle gauge for the miter gauge from George) if you know the angle, set the taper guide on its side and set the angle with that. In the case of Hans idea you’d have to reverse the taper guide ( no big deal ).

    Reply

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