Bandsaw Resawing

Duration: 4:08

George Vondriska provides instruction on how to select the proper side of the wood to cut a veneer, and which band saw blade will help you cut a great piece of veneer for your woodworking projects. A WoodWorkers Guild of America (WWGOA) original video.

Band saw blade provided by PS Wood Machines. For more information, visit www.pswood.com.

More Videos from PS Wood Machines:

Benefits of a Small Blade on a Bandsaw
Choosing the Right Scroll Saw Blades

Discussion
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6 Responses to “Bandsaw Resawing”
  1. ezgoing
    ezgoing

    George, in another re-sawing clip I saw a little bit ago, you suggested to ‘always mark your cut line when re-sawing’, but I notice on this one, there is no mark visible… any reason for this?

    Reply
    • WWGOA Team
      WWGOA Team

      I only mark the wood for resawing if I’m using a single point contact resaw fence. One of the benefits of doing drift compensation and using a full bandsaw fence, like I do in this video, is that you don’t have to mark the boards. The bandsaw fence works like a table saw fence, guiding the wood for you.

      Reply
  2. rl2thdr
    rl2thdr

    Which bandsaw blade is he using on this? I googled “low tension band saw blades” and nothing says low tension

    Reply
  3. Tony Mandle
    Tony Mandle

    George, I have a 14″ Band saw and recently put a 6″ extension on it to be able to re-saw wood so I can do some bookend matching. I am using 2″ x 8″ red oak half sawed and trying to saw it down the middle to make some 1″ x 8″ planks. However the initial flat planks have so much internal stress in the wood I am having a terrible time sawing the wood. Once sawed the planks are both cupped and bent. Wondering what my options are. Is there any way to flatten this wood other than to do more cuts and then jointing. Do you think steaming and then weighting them to dry would help here? A video of this problem would be wonderful.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hello Tony,

      Here is what our expert had to say regarding your question:

      Sometimes resawing releases stresses in the wood, and sometimes it is a matter of exposing a moisture imbalance. If it is stress, the wood generally distorts right as you are cutting it. In that case, I’m not sure that there is anything that can be done to straighten out the wood after the fact. If it is exposing a moisture imbalance, the distortion will typically occur over the 12-24 hours following the cut. You can prevent that by stickering and stacking the wood, and putting weight on top for a few days while it rebalances the moisture content in the wood. After it has achieved equilibrium, you can use the wood without further cupping.
      Paul

      Sincerely,
      Julia
      Woodworkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply