Fly Cutting a CNC Spoilboard

Duration: 5:48

The spoil board on a CNC router is considered a consumable commodity. Whether you’re screwing material down to the spoilboard, or doing through cuts that slightly cut into it, eventually you’re going to have to fly cut or level your spoil board. This video walks you through the process, helping your understand how to set this up on machine.

Other considerations

One reason for fly cutting your spoilboard is because fasteners and through cuts have made it irregular. But here’s something to consider; before using your CNC the first time you should fly cut the spoilboard. What? Why level the board when it’s a perfectly smooth piece of mdf? The reason for leveling the board on a brand new machine is to make certain it’s dead flat, and that the top of the board is perfectly parallel to the travel of the spindle or router. This is a very important step, and can have a huge affect on the accuracy you get from your CNC router.

Router bit selection

While nearly any router bit could be used for leveling a spoilboard, there are distinct characteristics to look for when it comes to choosing the best one. In this video we show you three different router bits, and talk about which one is best for this cut.

More on CNC routers

WoodWorkers Guild of America has been very active in educating woodworkers about CNC routers. Check out our extensive videos about benchtop CNC machines.

Discussion
  • (will not be published)

8 Responses to “Fly Cutting a CNC Spoilboard”
  1. Kenneth
    Kenneth

    The first video I tried to watch after buying your service (fly cutting the spoil board on cnc) wouldn’t work for me. What can I do to permit me to view the video?

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi, Kenneth. We are sorry to hear you are having trouble viewing our videos. Please contact us at 1-855-253-0822; our Customer Service Team would be happy to assist you.

      Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi Todd. This varies from machine to machine, but typically a bolt is recessed below the surface of the spoil board, and the nut that receives it is trapped in the t-track.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  2. Jeff Peters
    Jeff Peters

    If you were to use the spoil board to set your Z height then set your material height in your program. you would never cut into your spoil board

    Reply