Woodworking Blog Posts, Articles & Videos to Build Your Skills

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  • Red vs White Oak: How to Identify the Difference

    Red oak and white oak are in the same family, but have very different characteristics. Unfortunately simply looking at the boards may not give you enough information to tell the difference between the two. And no, looking at the color of the boards won’t do it. Red oak isn’t really red, and white oak isn’t

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  • A Guide to Turning Metal on a Wood Lathe

    If you have a wood lathe, you are probably accustomed to turning pens, spindles, and maybe even bowls. The common denominator is that most of the projects that you produce are probably made of wood. There’s no question that turning wood is one of the most fun things that you can do in a shop.

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  • How to Make Wood Plugs

    There are LOTS of ways to join wood. One tried and true method is to use screws to fasten parts together. But this can leave screws heads showing and, in most cases, you don’t want screw heads as a decorative element in your project. No problem, we can take care of that. It’s a fairly

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  • Chisel Buying Advice

    Purchasing new tools can be a daunting task. In this video, George answers a question from one of our Woodworkers Guild of America community members, giving his advice on how to purchase chisels. What can you expect to pay when buying chisels? Are some chisels better quality than others? Find the answers to these questions

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  • How to Eliminate Jointer Snipe

    If your jointer is leaving a divot on the trailing edge of your work piece, it will not only drive you crazy, but it will produce unsightly blemishes on your projects. As you face joint your pieces, that divot will invariably end up in a visible place on your table top or other prominent location.

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  • Planing Toward the Middle

    When you’re planing a board to thickness, there’s a little more involved than simply shoving the board through your planer. To get the best possible result, in regards to board stability, you should follow a specific sequence of events. What we’re after We have a couple of goals when we’re planing wood. One, of course,

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  • How to Make Face Frames

    If you’re interested in building cabinets, you’ll want to learn how to make face frames. If you plan to make a lot of cabinets, such as a set for your kitchen, then efficiency becomes very important. Learning how to make face frames is not hard, but like anything, there are some tips that can help

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  • Gluing Up a Hollow Column

    Gluing up a column, or any multi-sided object, can be a challenge. Getting uniform clamping pressure isn’t easy, unless you use just the right clamp. The key to good (and easy) clamping on multi-sided objects is using a strap clamp. Strap clamps allow you to completely wrap the object, getting perfectly uniform pressure from every

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  • Quick Tip: How to Change Planer Blades

    Knife changes aren’t too bad on benchtop planers, except for the eleventy billion bolts you have to take out of each knife. Times two or three to get ALL the knives changed. Wanna learn how to change planer blades faster, and easier? Eliminate hand work Most benchtop planers come with some kind of wrench that

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  • Kreg Adaptive Cutting System Review

    Track saws and cutting systems that use them are quite the rage. And it makes sense. What a great way to get large pieces cut down to more manageable sizes, straight line rip stock, cut funky angles, and more. But here’s my question: can you use a track saw and cutting system to produce all

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Discussion
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32 Responses to “Woodworking Blog Posts, Articles & Videos to Build Your Skills”
  1. Steve

    Not a comment, but a question- Have you ever used pear wood for a project? What are its properties, and does it have a nice grain pattern? What would be a recommended finish? Obviously, it would need to be a small project (bandsaw box, jewelry box, etc.) because there’s not much usable wood in most pear trees that I’ve seen. Thanks for any info you might pass along.

    Reply
    • John Shumake

      I have not used pear, but I have used plum and apple. The plum is a very pleasant brown with great grain. The apple I got is white like maple and the center is a light brown. I also have some spalted apple. I got my apple from one of the local orchards and the plum from a neighbor who cut down a couple of trees. I cut the into boards and stored them in the basement for about a year with a fan blowing on them. The plum tested at 12%. Both work well with simple tools. The plum was finished with poly and is FABULOUS looking, gets a lot of comment.

      Reply
  2. david

    if I was to cut a tree down,& wanted to use it for flooring. How long should it dry? Also could take a branch and cut 1/2 or3/4 inch slices of the branch and use it as flooring. thanks

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi David. You should get a good moisture meter and be sure that it is dry to the point of stabilization. In my shop in MN that typically means 8-10% depending on the time of year and the conditions. You don’t want to install flooring that hasn’t fully dried or you could experience problems. I would not recommend using limb wood for lumber since it is under stress and notoriously unstable. I would use only the trunk wood.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  3. Des Miscamble

    interesting- but how about skills regarding Scroll Saws? I have a Baumr-AG scroll saw ss16 arriving very soon – i have some experience

    Reply
  4. Kurt

    What product would you recommend to keep bark on a slab of wood before I use it for a cnc project.Then to seal it after it is done
    .

    Reply
  5. TOM TESS

    Question! I’ve been ask to make a pontoon boat table top, something that sports grain and some color. Teak is very expensive. How about some alternative suggestions!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Tom. I would consider white oak as an economical alternative.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  6. careyrmitchell

    Re the high top table using newel posts for legs. I made a number of plant stands and small side tables for the deck using stair spindles. I picked up several dozen nice spindles as closeouts for $.25 each. I flipped them upside down, cut off the square part that would have been at the top and had table legs. Simple mortises and tenoned aprons and a top – some nice small tables for about $2 each. These made great gifts with little effort or cost.

    Reply
  7. jeffhanson66

    I’m in the process of setting up my shop and am currently considering adding a bench top jointer and planer and would appreciate any expert recommendations regarding these two tools. Any advice to help decide between spiral cutters versus straight blades would help.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello. These are both game changing tools that really expand your capabilities. I’m a big fan of portable planers and I think that they are a perfect fit for a hobbyist or small pro shop. My top pic is this one: https://amzn.to/2N035g0
      If you want to save a little money, my second choice would be this one: https://amzn.to/2OaCiSR
      I’m less enthusiastic about portable jointers, but I have owned one and they can be reasonably effective for smaller projects. The downsides are the short beds, loudness, and lightweight. The one that I owned was this one: http://amzn.to/2sEbMb0
      It has plenty of power. A bigger machine would be better, but if you are tight on space these are a good option.
      Spiral vs. Straight knives. I wrote an article on this several years back. https://www.wwgoa.com/article/spiral-cutterheads-for-the-jointer-worth-the-upgrade-price/
      I have spiral cutterheads in both my jointer and planer and love them. I get great cut quality on even highly figured wood. Having said that, I would rather have a good jointer with straight knives than a marginal jointer with a spiral cutterhead. Same with a planer. For me, its all about tool quality, more so than which knives are used. But, if you can find a good deal on spiral cutters, by all means do it; they are awesome.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
      • jeffhanson66

        Thank you Paul. I have noticed in my research of bench top planers your recommendation comes up number one very often and I think I will go with that model. Also I just found a great source for rough sawn lumber, much red oak and walnut, and I think I will want a bigger jointer. Plus I believe I can make the necessary room for a floor standing jointer and have considered both Jet and Powermatic 6 inch models with straight knives and much longer tables. Both seem to be highly rated. During my research I ran across a forum talking about these two brands and many said they would go with Grizzly and possibly the 8 inch model for the price and capability, but I don’t think I want to deal with the power requirements for the 8 inch model. Right now I’m leaning towards the Powermatic 54A both because it’s the one George uses on the jointer and planer class dvd and because of what I have read about it. Do you lean stronger towards any of these three brands?

        Reply
        • Customer Service

          Hello. The PM54A is an incredible machine. I had a Jet 6″ jointer for a decade or so, and absolutely loved that as well.
          I have a Grizzly 8″ jointer and I’d say it is pretty decent. I like the Jet much better, and the Powermatic is even a bit nicer yet.
          If you have space and budget for an 8″ jointer, you will never regret it. It’s amazing how much rough lumber that I buy that will fit on an 8″ jointer but not on a 6″ jointer. If I had the space I’d go to a 12″ jointer, but an 8″ serves me pretty well. When I started to exclusively use rough cut lumber and had to face joint everything, I quickly felt like I had outgrown my 6″ jointer. Learn from my mistakes: If you buy it now, you won’t have to upgrade later, and it will cost you less in the long run. 🙂 I also like parallelogram jointers quite a bit and I feel that they are generally worth the additional cost. If you ever have to true up a sagging bed you’ll know what I’m talking about.
          This one would be the ideal jointer IMO: https://amzn.to/2UXel0X
          Or, you could buy it without the helical head and still have an outstanding jointer https://amzn.to/2X5ueUT
          Thanks
          Paul-WWGOA

          Reply
  8. abdiqadir ahmed xussen

    What you thought to do practicality and works in front of your heart producer’s will appear to have the winner’s way

    Reply
  9. JADA

    Enjoying all the videos, being a new woodworker I trying to figure out how to determine how many pins and tails to cut depending on width of the board. Is there a SIMPLE formula, one that could be used no matter size of board?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Jada,

      There’s not a formula that I’m aware of. You want at least three pins, and from there it comes down to what size DTs you want to cut. It becomes more of an aesthetic decision rather than one of joint strength.

      Thanks,

      Paul
      WoodWorkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  10. rich.casagrande

    Does anyone have a y suggestions on how to clean up tear out on a walnut cookie slab? Belt sander?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Rich. Belt sander should work the best for this. ROS might work ok if it isn’t too deep.
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  11. jeffhanson66

    My wife just got a Cricut Maker to start making signs and I am wondering if I can finish a piece of wood with tongue oil or some other finish and then to help the paint stick, spray it with dewaxed shellac before painting on the letters. Or would it be better to paint on the letters before applying the other finish?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello. If you want to paint the sign I would suggest applying primer then paint. No need for shellac or tongue oil prior to painting. That said, dewaxed shellac is a good sealer, and you could use that over other finishes to create a suitable painting surface if you want.
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  12. Serita Alaelua

    Do you guys or can u guys make videos step by step on making a billiard pool table? The common size to begin with.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Serita. We do not have a video on this, but man, what a cool project. Good luck!
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  13. georgeh

    I just bought a brand new Jet 6″ Jointer. I did all the cleaning and protective coatings as the manufacturer instructed. Everything was fine until I started jointing pressure treated wood. Everytime a run PT wood through the jointer it starts to rust and I have to clean it and coat it again as soon as I finish. Do you have any suggestions what I could use to protect my new jointer from pressure treated wood?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi George. That stuff is really wet, and is notorious for causing rust on cast iron tools. Your best bet is to apply a good sealant like this one regularly: https://www.wwgoa.com/product/topsaver-kit-pack/ and clean the chips off the table top as soon as you are done using the machine.
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  14. Mick

    Silly question time! Invariably,I guess,my bandsaw blade will go blunt.Can the blade be sharpened,or do I need to buy another one?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Mick. It is possible to sharpen them, but with a standard high speed steel blade I generally just toss them out when dull and buy a new one. If you use a good quality blade such as a Timberwolf, the blade should last a long time with typical hobbyist use.
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  15. ROBERT

    Saw the video on the pocket screw joint to glue or not to glue. With glue was stronger and the reason why could be in your statement you said the glue does soak into the end grain and not bond, but it does soak into the end grain therefore making the wood stronger against the screws pulling through the wood. The glue bonds the fibers in the wood so the screws do not pull through as easy.

    Reply