Chip-Free Flush Trimming

Duration: 3:13

Demonstrating on cathedral raised-panel doors, George Vondriska teaches you how to get a flush trim with a curved piece of wood to a pattern template using an Ultimate Trim Bit on the router table. His expert woodworking technique and this specialized router bit will guarantee you a smooth, chip-free flush trimming cut on both the downhill and uphill sides of a curve.

Ultimate Trim Bits provided by Whiteside Machine Company. For more information, visit www.whitesiderouterbits.com.

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2 Responses to “Chip-Free Flush Trimming”
  1. Alec
    Alec

    Im having difficulty with trying to flush trim some stool legs. Im using a fixed base router. Im getting tear out I think its because of going against the grain if I try to go the other way im climb cutting and im still getting tear out in some cases. Any thoughts?

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hey Alec,
      Here’s what the experts had to say about your question:

      Flush trim routing can sometimes be a “splintery” process, particularly if you are using a wood species with coarse grain such as oak. To reduce tearout, be sure to remove as much wood as possible, leaving only the slightest amount of wood to remove in the flush trim process. If you start to notice tearout, stop. Either use a sander to remove some of the material and get closer to your final line, or try reversing the direction. By reversing the feed direction you are entering into a climb cut which should be done with great caution and control, and only with a tiny amount of wood removal to be done.

      Paul
      Wood Workers Guild of America Expert

      Reply