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WWGOA LIVE! December 2019

A big thank you to Paul Mayer for sharing his expertise on December’s WWGOA LIVE.

:55 Paul Mayer Intro
3:25 Flattening a board larger than your jointer
5:11 Hand chisel recommendation
6:40 Add a brake to a bandsaw?
8:00 Change the motor on a dust collector?
9:50 Size of a dust collector
11:40 Cutting cookies from a log
14:30 Hanging air filter vs dust collector
17:00 Outdoor woodworking bench
18:50 George’s saddle square Veritas
19:20 Dust collector for a small space
23:20 Manometer
25:20 Exhausting a dust collector outside
26:30 Router table options
27:40 Finish for plywood
29:18 Reindeer contest
30:50 Portable dust collector?
33:20 After market dust filter American Fabric Filter
34:35 Router for jointing on a router table
35:30 Turning wet oak bowls
37:18 Exotic wood recommendations
37:50 Popping quilting on maple
40:50 Venting a dust collector outside?
43:00 Moisture content for wood
44:00 Manometer for measuring CFM
45:20 Planer or jointer first
48:05 DIY CNC plans?
49:19 Differences in walnut?
50:20 Drying green wood bowls
54:05 Axiom Stratus?
55:05 Final color of air dried cherry vs kiln dried cherry
56:05 Mold when drying bowls
56:30 Dust collector for a new shop

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Discussion
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6 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! December 2019”
  1. Johnny Getz

    I have home made carts for most of my tools and have medium sized shop vacs under each tool. larger tools share a large shop vac while being used. and a dust mask.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Philip,

      If you are referring to joining boards together to form a table top, you don’t really have to use either of those mechanical aids. As long as you establish good square edges to form your joint, your glue alone will form a bond that is stronger than the wood itself.

      -Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
    • Customer Service

      Brian,

      Here’s one of the ones that I use: https://amzn.to/2BZYbMU

      I believe that it is quite good for the money. It’s not as precise as my more expensive “pinless” style moisture meter, but more important than precision accuracy is being able to monitor for when your material stabilizes. In other words, if it says 10% today, and it said 10% two months ago, and has been stored properly inside that entire time, it is probably safe to use. On the other hand, if it says 10% today and it said 11% last month, I’d give it another month to see if it has stabilized at 10%.

      -Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply