Drawer Installation Tips

Duration: 2:06

Mechanical drawer slides make it easy to open and close a drawer, but you’ve got to insert the drawer correctly to make sure you don’t destroy the slide and end up with bearings all over the floor. Check out these drawer installation tips.

Relevant Links:

DIY Drawers: Lock-Joint

DIY Dresser: Attaching Drawer Fronts

DIY Dresser: Cedar Dresser Drawer Liners

How To Make Self Closing Drawer Slides

Drawer Joinery Using A Slot Cutter

DIY Drawers: Lock Joint On A Dresser

Reply to Don Behrns
  • (will not be published)

6 Responses to “Drawer Installation Tips”
  1. Александр Караев
    Александр Караев

    Какую на грузку выдерживает ящик.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska
      George Vondriska

      If it helps, these are 100 pound (45 kg) capacity slides. That’s a very common load rating for full extension slides.

      Reply
  2. Hernan
    Hernan

    The simplest way is always the better, and in this case the solution is to use concealed runners for wooden drawers.
    Drawers more efficient, reliable and better looking

    Reply
  3. Jay
    Jay

    Installing these slides is much more complicated than that and are often not much fun. Squareness of the cabinet and drawer are critical and this can be the point when “close enough” isn’t good enough. The thickness of each slide is 1/2″, so you will lose 1″ there. The tolerance is typically up to 1/16″, which means plus or minus 1/32″ but it can’t be less than the 1″ difference between the width of the drawer opening and the drawer itself. Additionally, the slides need to be aligned exactly parallel to each other. All oily, they’re no fun to handle. There are a lot of slide jigs that can help, but they’re often as awkward to use than not. You really need 3 hands: 2 to hold the slide in position and one to insert the screws. Depending on your cabinet design, using clamps can help, but you have to be careful not to deform the slide and it still takes 3 hands to get it in the correct position. Getting slide installation right is a matter of skill and luck. The more skill you have, the less luck you you’ll need.

    The bearings will usually fall out when too much force is placed on closing or opening the slides, especially with opening. The end cap(s) can be dislodged and the bearings will fall out, going everywhere. While they can be replaced, if you can recover most of them, the end caps tend to be pulled out again, so it’s best to replace the slide(s) at that point. This is more common with aging slides. Replacement in that situation is fairly easy since you can use the old slide holes as guides to mounting the new slides, assuming the old slides were installed correctly.

    As far as evaluating the online, slide quality reviews is concerned, those who have trouble installing them will often get frustrated and blame it on the slides themselves. I have not seen any significant difference in slide performance based on price, so it’s probably okay to go for the least expensive, especially if you’re going to need a bunch of them.

    Reply