No-Drip Wood Glue

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George Vondriska shows the advantages of using no-drip and no-run wood glue on your woodworking projects. With no-drip wood glue you can eliminate the messes some wood glues create during the assembly process. You’ll be able to avoid glue running down the sides of you’re the most complicated woodworking projects, like the tapered display cabinet seen in this video.

Titebond No Run, No Drip Wood Glue provided by Titebond. For more information, visit www.titebond.com.

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Discussion
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5 Responses to “No-Drip Wood Glue”
    • WWGOA Team

      Thank you for contacting us. In regards to you comment you’ll still get squeeze out, which is a good indication that you used enough glue, but the squeeze out isn’t running down the face of the project.

      Reply
  1. Keith Mealy

    I like the No-Run No-Drip glue — it’s great on short grain joints such as miters. I suspect it also works well on “butt and biscuit” joints (AKA T-joints) where the biscuit is glued to the end grain of one piece.

    However, why not let gravity work for you and not against you as far as drip avoidance? Insert the biscuits in the loose side piece first. Then add glue to the shelves’ slots while they’re open at the top then set the side onto the top edge of the shelves. It may not make much difference, but it also gets the biscuit fully set into the side that needs it most, the one with end-grain glue surface.

    How to you cut the biscuit slots at 3 degrees or are they at 0 (i.e., 90?) and just sit in the pieces at an angle to the joint line?

    Also, I’ve noticed in the last two videos that when you do biscuits, you just add the glue from the bottle. Do you ever have failures? I usually take a craft stick and smear it on both side walls of the mortise and remove the excess. so it doesn’t squeeze out.

    [Or maybe “I’m over-analyzing?”]

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’ve found that “shooting” glue from the bottle into the slot works well. No, no failures.

      Your approach to getting the joint to come together with minimal squeeze out sounds like a good one.

      Reply

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