Making Shop-Made Sleds for Small Project Pieces

Duration: 6:20

George Vondriska shows you how to create and use two different sleds in your woodworking shop using Micro Jig appliances, one for cutting perfect miters on your table saw, and another that will help you to easily crosscut small woodworking pieces with your band saw. The Zero PlayGuide Bar System from Micro Jig fits directly into the miter gauge slots on your table saw and band saw, which ensures that your sled will stay on a straight line and makes your job much easier.

Zero PlayGuide Bar System provided by Micro Jig. For more information, visit www.microjig.com.

More Videos from Micro Jig:

Bandsaw, Router Table, and Table Saw Safety

Discussion
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7 Responses to “Making Shop-Made Sleds for Small Project Pieces”
  1. John B
    John B

    it didn’t appear at first for me either. Took 2 minutes of audio playing before I got a picture

    Reply
  2. WALTER
    WALTER

    I always thought each cut needed to be basically exactly 45 degrees. In my mind, I don’t understand if one end is 46 and the other is 44 (yes I know that equals 90 degrees) but I don’t see how the frame will come out square. I struggle making frames because I cannot consistently get all the four corners to fit exact without some space showing. And I do not understand how this sled will solve that issue.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi Walter. That is the beauty of complementary angles. The sum of the angles adds up to 90 degrees, so if you follow the procedure you’ll end up with a square frame. This approach takes the mystery out of the process and “just works”.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
      • WALTER
        WALTER

        Well, since I have one I need to trim a little, I will try to make one of these this weekend and see what happens! BUT just to make it more fun, since I do not own a table saw at this time, I will need to work it with a Radial Arm saw. Think the same idea would work, just be cutting from the top and not the bottom.

        I will need to determine a method of always aligning the “sled” at the same spot…. put a block on one end that bumps up against the edge. Then maybe it will be lined up when I try to make the cuts.

        We will see, thank you for this idea!

        Walter

        Reply
  3. Jason
    Jason

    I asked this question of the experts via email about using a brad nailer vs a stapler. George appears to prefer a stapler for tacking his projects together. The answer I received back was to get a brad nailer rather than a pneumatic stapler. I believe this comes down to personal preference and that the brad nailer has more versatility for someone just starting out.

    Reply