This tiered planter is great for colorful perennials or trailing plants like strawberries. Made from redwood, cedar or pine, the project is simple and inexpensive to build with our tiered planter box plans.

It calls for standard lumber, galvanized nails, sandpaper and sealer. Construction is a simple matter of cutting the pieces to size and assembling with galvanized nails. To finish, sand and apply a coat of sealer or paint. The tiered planter is about 30 inches square by 14 inches tall if you adhere to our tiered planter box plans.

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30 Responses to “Tiered Planter Box Plans”
  1. Ron

    I would like to sign up for the premium membership, but it appears to me that after I sign up there are more costs for me to see/download videos.

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    • WWGOA Team

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    • Johnny Jones

      I can’t even get signed in so just give me my money back and I will find another way to get the plans I want

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  2. James

    The plans do not show how the inner box is put together (Parts A to Parts B). Are they toenailed together or is there a trick I am unaware of? Or does the top half of the “box” merely sit on the bottom half

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    • WWGOA Team

      I’d suggest using two 3″ deck screws at each corner. I would also suggest that you pre-drill your holes to minimize splitting. Paul

      Reply
  3. Mitch

    Attempted download, Multiple times. restarted computer and cleared history/cookies. No joy. Error is:
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      Hi, Mitch!

      We’re sorry that you’re having trouble downloading this attachment. We have sent a PDF file to your email address. Please let us know if you need further assistance.

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  4. oldman62

    Also having a download issue:
    This XML file does not appear to have any style information associated with it. The document tree is shown below.

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    2015-09-16T15:24:10Z
    2015-09-16T15:24:32Z
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    29tgB0ObRDgeozopDc2S2ZuhEHfANlYlWMkemTLEpW+/2NzoA+ZPke4wKq70HKPkswVBZBi1hhk=

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    • WWGOA Team

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    • Customer Service

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    • Customer Service

      Hi Mike. I wouldn’t. The current stuff is presumably safer than the older products because it doesn’t have arsenic in it, but I wouldn’t use any treated lumber for vegetable gardens.

      Reply
  5. George F. Howell

    looking for planter boxes and like to us some the wood I have from other projects

    Reply
  6. Michael

    The photos show some spacing between the “E” pieces, but the plan does not show how to space them. Just how big of a space is between them? Also what about the drain holes how big and how far apart should they be? Some actual dimensions on the plan would be really useful, or maybe more instructions on how to assemble would be easier to type in rather than putting dimensions on the drawing.

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    • Customer Service

      Hi, Michael. The spacing between the E parts should be 1/4″. I’d suggest cutting a couple scraps to 1/4″ and using them as spacers. Drain holes are 1/4″ and spaced every 3″.

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    • Customer Service

      Hi, Richard. Please log into your membership account to access the plans.

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    • Customer Service

      Hey Joseph,

      You can use any wood that is moisture resistant. Cedar is a good choice if it is available in your area.

      Happy Woodworking!
      Kate
      WWGOA Video Membership

      Reply