If you spend a lot of time in the yard or garden during the warm weather, then this do-it-yourself birdhouse will make a great summer project. Not only will the birds love it, but as it ages the wood (western cedar) will turn a soft silver color and the copper roof will acquire a handsome green patina.

 The project calls for just eight pieces and is easy enough for beginners. To build, simply cut the parts out of inexpensive cedar fencing (other wood may be substituted), cut out, sand and assemble everything using glue and finish nails. To finish, roof the projects using sheet copper and copper tacks. The project measures about 16 inches tall by 8 inches wide by 7 inches deep.

Discussion
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78 Responses to “Cedar Birdhouse Plans”
    • Doug

      Very wise Edward! Being able to open and clean will allow you to have more birds in the future as I understand this. Good one!.

      Reply
  1. Matt Reynolds

    I ‘m a highschool Woodshop teacher and I hope there are a few free plans here on this site.

    Reply
  2. Steven P TYraw

    Sell birdhouses at benefits and fairs and have ones ask about kits for home or child assembly. Hope this item might just fill the ticket.

    Reply
  3. Steven P Traw

    Often sell birdhouses at benefits and fairs with requests for kits for home put-together projects. Hope these plans may provide just the answer.

    Reply
  4. lucien

    barn swallos like an oval hole11/2″ wide4/4 to 7/8″ hjgh over 5″ from bottom with no perch this stops predaters from
    attacking their young

    Reply
    • Stephen

      I think that you meant to say tree swallows. Barn swallows will use a nest shelf but not a nest box.

      Reply
    • WWGOA Team

      You will find options in this category at woodworking specialty stores and online retailers such as Amazon.com. Easy Wood Tools (http://www.easywoodtools.com/) is a popular provider of such tools, but there are many options becoming available in this category.

      Reply
    • WWGOA Team

      Hi, Rose! This is a Premium plan. To access this plan, please log into your account using your username and password.

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    • WWGOA Team

      Hi, Mark! This is a Premium Plan. Please make sure you’re logged in with your username and password to view it.

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  5. Chas Tiedemann

    I love building Bird houses and feeders. I like having them come around so I can take photos of them.

    Reply
    • WWGOA Team

      Hi, Jim! Please let us know what type of error message you’re receiving when you’re attempting to access these plans.

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  6. Alfred Verrall

    I am retired and a beginner and find at working with wood, and have found this site very interesting

    Reply
  7. joseph

    There are no provisions for opening the bird house to clean it out for the season.
    The dowel perch is not necessary and gives predatory birds a better foot hold to raid the nest.
    Entrance hole should be sized as small as possible for the birds you hope will occupy the house.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Edward. You may access these plans by logging into your Premium Membership account.

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  8. richard

    Using 2″ holes might work well for undesirable birds, such as starlings and English sparrows… Entrance holes 1½” in diameter are best for most desirable song birds, except the larger ones like robins, jays, etc. These smaller holes will discourage annoying birds like starlings.

    Someone mentioned omitting the perching dowels: Great suggestion! Small birds do have a particular need (or desire) to perch beside their entry hole. Why advertise or attract potential predators: Hey predator, this is where I live and here is my front (and only) door? Also, the large dowel perches make good landing platforms for predators and / or squirrels to hang on, just waiting for their next meal to pop out of the hole. Something an inch long by ½” wide (like a triangular strip made by cutting a rectangular piece at a 45° angle off a ¾” board) below the hole would be a decent quick platform to provide a better landing base to then quickly hop into their new home. Quite likely, a parent feeding its young will land on the roof to survey the area for ominous threats before entering the bird house, but will more likely land on a perching site a few yards away from the birdhouse.

    Someone asked about painting the bird house: Why? Painting is a human thing; I suppose people like things painted and pretty, but birds likely “prefer” a non-targeted nesting site: consider going “au naturale.” One purpose of using cedar is its natural attribute of not rotting as fast as other wood. Also, note that pressure treated wood usually contains toxins. Use something like a natural oil or beeswax if you live in a wetter climate; if you _have_ to use something, select a paint with low volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are generally non-toxic and neutral, natural tones. I am pretty sure birds would be content with a rustic “home” that blends in with the surroundings. The roof on top should provide decent protection from rain and snow.

    I suggest a couple modifications to the design… First, make the back piece (part C) extend above and below the bird house. This provides a better option to attaching it to whatever. Also, the top of sides B (the “sides of the birdhouse) could be mitered at 45° to allow the sloped roof to fit on the top of the sides more securely; it is not really necessary for the root to fit on top of the back board (part C). Birdhouses can get hot; providing a couple _small_ ventilation holes would be a good idea. The roof’s overhang should be sufficient to keep water from entering thru the vent holes. Additionally, I would drill several small holes on the top and, perhaps, just above the bottom (parts A) where the nest rests. Additionally, I would slope the bottom boards 10-15° (they do not need to be flat for a nest). Do this by cutting the part A pieces at an angle, then can provide a sufficient and sloped nesting base; they do not have to be 90°. This slight slope will provide for any water or other liquid to drain the nest support board. Additionally, the very bottom pieces (both part A pieces) should have small holes to facilitate drainage (and ventilation). Finally, I would put a hinge on the bird box (on one of the part B sides) to facilitate opening and cleaning the bird house. For rigidity, one could use a top and bottom bracing piece, inside the birdhouse.

    What is not mentioned is where to place the birdhouse. Place it at least 5 feet above the ground, in a place where it can be easily monitored, not facing the prevailing winds, and on the south side of a building which would get quite hot in the summer. Placing a birdhouse in or around trees would be ideal, particularly if the trees can provide shade and wind protection.

    Reply
  9. Papa

    Great project to do with grandkids! Some precutting of scraps off a pergola project, bit of predrilling and a great afternoon with the grand kids.

    Reply
  10. highpockets482

    It would be nice if you could give us hole diameters for what size birds. Bluebirds, Wrens, etc. Thanks

    Reply
  11. wanderin2

    Never ever put a perch on a birdhouse! Nesting birds will have no trouble getting in without it, but predator birds will use it to sit on to reach the young inside.

    Reply
  12. Jean-Paul

    i’m just looking for some very easy woodworking plans so I can get started

    Reply
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      Jean-WWGOA Video Membership

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    • Customer Service

      Hi Frank. In order to view the plans you will need to be logged into your account. If you have any questions, please give our customer service team a call at 1-855-253-0822.
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