WWGOA LIVE! September 2016

We had an excellent live stream, with no technical issues and great expertise help from Jim Heavey of WOOD Magazine. Glue ups to turning to screw selection, we covered a lot of ground.

0:23 Jim Heavey introduction
2:06 What type of wood screws for the shop?
4:11 Case hardening and table saw cuts
6:45 Depth of cut when routing a dado
9:08 Home center vs hardwood supplier material
11:10 Jim at The Woodworking Show
12:15 Using a hand planer to flatten wood
14:28 Using an abrasive cleaning stick on a surface sander
16:35 Tips for gluing up panels
19:28 Avoiding tear out when using a scraper on the inside of a bowl
24:08 Removing nails from reclaimed hardwood
27:56 Weekend with Wood 2017
29:30 What’s the deal with parallel jaw clamps?
33:54 Jointer or planer?
36:27 110 v or 220 v?
37:17 Hands on classes at Vondriska Woodworks
39:00 Food safe finish for hot drinks
42:00 Table saw blades
44:17 Sharpening on a WorkSharp 3000
47:55 Skydiving
48:56 Wiping glue?
51:15 Mill to final dimension, or wait a day?
53:30 Slow drying poly
55:45 Woodworking videos on a Shopsmith
57:00 Our viewers are from…

800x300-LIVE Page Banner v5
Discussion
  • (will not be published)

181 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! September 2016”
  1. Vince

    George is was another great live segment, as always. You better watch out your daughter may have a carrer in woodworking. Hope to talk to you soon. Vince Choraszewski, From Livonia Michigan.

    Reply
  2. Bill

    I was wondering if I could get George to answer the following woodworking question. Two years woodworking and I finally invested in an impact driver and I would like to stock up in wood screws and the corresponding driver bits to match. There are so many options, square, star, … and of course all the myriad of screw types. What type of screws would be George’s go-to screws he typically reach for say quick assembly vs fine furniture? Sizes too… i.e. #8 1″, 1 1/4″, … Thanks in advance! Bill Vanca

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Bill. You’ll want to have a variety of lengths of wood screws. The most common is a #6 or #8 in the 1″ to 1.5″ range, but occasionally you’ll find a need for 2″ to 4″ as well.

      Reply
  3. blackemmons

    Jim is one of my favorites. Seen him at many ww shows. I like that he keeps things simple. JimE

    Reply
  4. Bob

    what is the best dust collection you would recommend,Keep up the great videos yours is one of the very best thank you an yours.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      There are lots of great dust collection options. Cyclones have hit the market big time, and do a great job of separating dust and chips. You have to do some research and match your tool/dust collection needs with the size of collector, and decide if you want to pipe your shop, or simply connect the collector to one machine at a time.

      Reply
  5. Darwin

    I know it depends on the bit diameter and material but…When I rout a dado, how do I know how much to take with each pass?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Darwin. It depends on the material density, bit size (both cutter diameter and shank size), as well as the power of the router itself. It’s pretty easy to tell when you are trying to bite off too much, as the router will make unpleasant sounds and you might see some chatter. I’d suggest starting with 1/8″ for your first pass, and go deeper gradually until you feel like you have found a sweet spot for your setup.

      Reply
  6. Rand Hill

    Several years ago I was ripping a piece of hardwood and it was giving me fits. After it went through the blade the wood was closing up on the blade. Well, I was trying to force it through the blade and things got out of control and my hand slid into the blade. After four surgeries I can use my hand again. Anyway I was wondering if there is a name for this phenomena and what causes it. I had never run into this before my accident and since then I have had it happen twice. Now when it happens I immediately trash the board!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Rand. I’m very sorry to hear that this happened to you. This is caused by internal stress in the board that is released during the cut. The stress was likely caused by drying the wood too quickly in the kiln, or from natural grain patters occurring in the board.

      Reply
  7. Phil

    Table saw blades, best number of teeth for rip cutting blade, best number of teeth for cross cutting blades or is there a blade that does an excellent job on both. In your mind and experience who makes excellent table saw blades.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Phil. On a 10″ table saw a standard ripping blade generally has 24 teeth, cross cutting blades can vary but 60 teeth is a common configuration. A combination blade is generally 40 teeth.
      There are lots of good blade manufacturers out there these days. I’ve had the best luck with Freud and Forrest.
      In terms of how to get the best results on your table saw, we have lots of materials on this topic: https://www.wwgoa.com/how-to-use-a-table-saw/ .

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Make sure your rip fence and miter gauge are correctly set. Use the right blade; 24-40 teeth for ripping, 60 teeth for crosscutting.

      Reply
  8. Joe Tomeo

    I have some reclaimed oak that has nails in it installed with a nail gun. When I tried to remove them they just break off. Can you suggest a way to remove them without breaking them off?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Joe. Good question. I normally just cut around them. Depending on how pristine you want your project to be, you could also use a nail bunch to bang them in below the surface and fill with putty. That might be ok for some projects, and not for others.

      Reply
      • edh

        My neighbor reclaimed some Hem-fir from a building constructed in WW2. He had the same problem. So he used an old fashioned soldering iron to heat each nail until it was red hot, let it cool and the nail came out. Long very tedious job.

        Reply
  9. Ed Brignole

    I’m wondering how to avoid tear out when I’m turning the inside of a bowl especially when I’m using a scraper.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Ed. The best things that you can do are to get your tool as sharp as possible, and find an RPM where the tearout becomes minimized. Also, try holding the tool at different angles. Sometimes tilting the scraper at 45 degrees can provide more of a sheer cut than a scraping action, and it can make a big difference.

      Reply
  10. Edward

    Dear George,
    Thanks for your unbelievable WWGOA site. I’m on line most everyday fishing around looking at your very interesting videos and articles. I also appreciate your live programs, they are very informative.
    My issue is as follows;
    I recently built a table for my boat. The table was used below deck in an out of the weather cabin. The table was made in a square ‘pie shape’. basicly 4 triangles glued together. This section was made of walnut. This center section was picture framed with 4.5″ wide cherry, mitered and glued together. I used walnut splines in all glue joints. The glue used was ‘titebond 3’ waterproof glue. After a few months I noticed the mitered cherry joints opening up and these transmitted to the center walnut area. I cannot figure what caused this failure other than that the cherry may have a different rate of heat related expansion than the walnut. At this point the joints have opened 1/4″ on two of the corners making this a total redo.
    The cherry and walnut were made of 5/4 material. All were thickness planed to uniform dimensions and all glue joints were planned and squared on a jointer.
    Any thoughts you may have to explain this failure will be appreciated and I look forward to your live program.
    Thanks,
    Ed Nappi

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I also made a pie shaped table and had similar problems. I think it has to do with expansion and contraction of the pieces working against each other.

      Reply
  11. PAUL

    I HAVE A MAHOGANY DINNING ROOM TABLE THAT HAS A BROKEN LEG WHERE IT BOLTS TO THE UNDERSIDE. IT IS SQUARED AT THE TOP AND HAS SPLIT IN IT. CAN I USE DOWELS AND GLUE TO REPAIR IT? IF SO WHAT SIZE DOWELS 1/4″ OR LARGER?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      It’s hard to know without seeing the break. If the break comes together clean, you may not need dowels at all. Good yellow glue, like Titebond original, would do a great job. If you need to reinforce it with dowels, 1/4″ should be fine.

      Reply
  12. Rick

    I am in the market for a new table saw would like to go with one of the hybrids have been looking at the grizzly g0715p. But it seems when I look at reviews all the Hybrids seem to have problems do you have any recommendations. Also can you get a board good in square to work with with a surface planer table saw and router no access to jointer your right now. Rick wells Vandalia Il.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Rick. In terms of hybrid saws, I think there are lots of good options. I like Sawstop, Jet, Ridgid and Laguna, and there are likely others.
      In terms of getting a board square without a jointer, I’d suggest the following:
      – use a hand plane to get it “flat enough” to run through the planer- put the flat hand planed surface face down and plane the opposite side- flip the board and plane the side that you hand planed, which will clean it up.- use a band saw to cut one straight edge on the board- place that edge against the table saw fence and rip the other edge parallel- flip the board again and put the edge that you just cut against the fence and rip the other edge parallel.

      Reply
  13. ds_handley

    What is the best technique to use when planing with a hand held power plane?
    Unless you plane a board that is 6 inches oversize I can’t see how you can do it keeping the plane in contact with the board for the whole length.
    How do you plane a larger surface such as a table top with these power planes?
    Am I trying to achieve the impossible?
    Am I using the wrong tool?
    Cheers for now
    David Handley, Leavenheath, Colchester, Essex, UK

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      I would not advocate using a hand held power plane for this type of work. A traditional hand plane would provide a lot more finesse, and even that would be challenging enough. I like power jointers and thickness planers for the tasks that you are trying to achieve.

      Reply
  14. 1withthegrain

    What is all of the “hoop-lah” about these parallel bar clamps? I have been using my trusty pipe clamps as long as I can remember. Is there a true return on making an investment in these not-so-cheap clamps?

    Reply
  15. Phil Cusimano

    How do you Properly offset European door hinges and install overlay door alignment perfectly, Thanks!

    Reply
  16. Joy

    George-I have a lot of your DVDs, but am looking for some hands on woodworking classes. Do you offer those?

    Reply
  17. jon

    what size air compressor is good just using a nail gun? also later down the line i might get a HVLP spry gun would that effect the compressor size.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Most nail guns don’t require much air supply. HVLP sprayers do. Check the HVLP gun you’re considering, and look for specs on the CFM (cubic feet per minute) it requires. That’ll help you size your compressor.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      This is case hardening. If the material is case hardened, there’s really nothing you can do about it.

      Reply
  18. Fil Villarreal

    I buy my wood/lumber from the retail box store and find, regardless of how much I search, I always end up with crooked wood. I’ve got limited funds and want to buy a jointer or planer. Which should I get first?

    Reply
  19. Dave Willits

    Have kreg router table,need new router that accepts 1/4&1/2 shanks and possible lift. Suggestions on router and is lift necessary if so options there as well. Tia Dave

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      There are a number of routers that would be good candidates for a router table. 12 amp or 15 amp machine will serve you well. If you’re not using a lift I prefer a fixed based router in the table, as opposed to a plunge base. Most routers these days will accept 1/4 ” and 1/2″ shanks, but confirm that before you buy. A router lift isn’t a must-have, but is very nice to have.

      Reply
  20. Pam

    Appreciate tips on doing panel glue-ups without smearing the glue on the underside of the panel.

    Thanks

    Reply
  21. Russell

    I have a Work Sharp 2000 tool sharpener that was purchased at Menards and given to me. What is your opinion of this for sharpening my lathe tools and other chisels?

    Reply
  22. Mark Thompson

    Your live web events are great. Thanks for sharing your knowledge. I am watching from Japan.

    Reply
  23. Richard Mahoney

    What finish for food safe if the food is hot? coffee and / or soup may degrade the finish and ruin the taste of the food. I’m hoping to start coopering large coffee mugs and don’t want to be confined to ice coffee.

    Reply
  24. Rob Josephson

    Can you provide recommendations for refacing kitchen cabinets using veneers and plywood?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      You can do some amount of sharpening on a diamond stone. But a pro sharpener will do the best job of keeping your router bits super sharp. Check with local cabinet shops to see who they use and trust.

      Reply
  25. gcoyne

    I have a router that is one speed. I’ve seen 3rd party controllers that provide variable speed to those routers. Is that safe to use for the router motor?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t recommend it. I think that routers that come with variable speed are made for variable speed. I believe that it voids the warranty if you add variable speed to a single speed router.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      It’s really hard to answer this question without knowing your budget and what kind of woodworking you’re doing. I recommend getting clamps as needed for specific projects, and your collection will grow over time.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Thanks for letting us know where you’re watching from. Glad the tips are helping you.

      Reply
  26. Bud Obst

    I’m from Milwaukee but living in Christchurch, New Zealand now. Love your show. I’ve got a ShopSmith I bought in 1987.

    Reply
  27. jim berkevich

    Speaking of the 19/38 I am having a hard time keeping the paper completely square on the drum .The paper wants to ride on itself about 6 to 8 inches from the right side. from Lakefield mn

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Make sure you’re cutting the angle correctly on the paper, and holding it taut while wrapping.

      Reply
  28. charliex

    Charles here. My question, the new tite bond thick glue, good for chair repair. Over hide glue.

    Reply
  29. Eric

    Hey Jim, perhaps many of tonight’s listeners are not familiar with your article ” Just Shut-Up”. How about summarizing that for us.

    Reply
  30. Mikey Sansom

    I have osb subfloor and was putting down 3/8 plywood over it before I install laminate floor would it be ok to put a sealer on the plywood before installing the flooring

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      This is a home building question that the folks at The Family Handyman might be able to help you with.

      Reply
  31. engine

    Pulling Nails…If the nail is above the surface, I have had some luck using a channellock pliers or a visegrip pliers depending on the size of the nail

    Reply
  32. Roger

    A revisit on the glue removal question earlier. I realize there are differing ways of doing the same thing, but consistantly on WWGOA you (George), have stated that water and glue removal don’t mix due to possible cupping etc.

    Reply
  33. Mark

    Technique – use the black pipe for the clamps, then use auto paste wax and coat them well. Glue won’t stick and black marks won’t be as much of a problem – for what it’s worth.

    Reply
  34. Bruce Macdonald

    George, Jim. I’ve heard people recommend to mill your rough stock to – almost- final dimension. Then let it sit a few days and then mill to final dimension. Why is that? Is it really worth the extra step?

    Reply
  35. Mark Spencer

    Spray Poly dries extremely more slowly than wipe on Poly. I live in Dallas TX area. What is going on? How can I get spray poly to dry quicker?

    Reply
  36. Steve Von Bokern

    The two part bar top finish should be ok for food contact and would hold up to coffee.

    Reply
  37. Dennis Romano

    I’m enjoying watching from Clayton CA (30 miles east of San Francisco). No question, but a comment: life is too short for cheap tools. And I agree that parallel face clamps are the way to go.

    Reply
  38. David Dumont

    Hi George! I’m watching from Mikado in northeast Michigan. Excellent show! Nice to see Jim on today.

    Reply
  39. Mark Thompson

    Both of you guys are great teachers. Good communicators and very engaging. Thanks again from Japan.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I recommend to anyone looking for a table saw that they check the SawStop machines. Their safety feature is great, and worth every penny.

      Reply
  40. Joseph

    The acoustics in George’s shop are terrible, multiple echoes and sounds like he is talking in a well

    Reply
  41. stan rauchwerger

    I’m not sure if you are aware, the video stops & starts as the video is downloading. I’m not sure if it’s happening for many of your viewers or it’s just me.

    Reply
  42. VERNON

    WHEN USING A 15 TO 18 GAUGE NAIL GUN, I FIND A PAIR OF SIDE CUT OR FENCE PLIERS TO PULL THE NAIL OUT AT THE SAME DIRECTION THE NAIL WAS PUT

    Reply
  43. VERNON

    WHEN USING A 15 TO 18 GAUGE NAIL GUN, I FIND A PAIR OF SIDE CUT OR FENCE PLIERS TO PULL THE NAIL OUT AT THE SAME DIRECTION THE NAIL WAS PUT , WATCHING N GOLDEN VALLEY ARIZONA

    Reply
  44. Jim Whiting

    Enjoyed the live broadcast tonight. I happened to find it rather than having scheduled it. Is there a time each month? Could this hour be noticed on your regular broadcast so that we can get to it on purpose instead by accident? Jim Whiting from Springville,Utah.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      We always run at 7 PM CDT. In October we’ll be switching from Wednesday nights to Thursday nights, but I don’t have the exact date yet. If you check the WWGOA Facebook page, there’s typically a notice of upcoming Live events a week or so ahead of time.

      Reply
  45. Roger Leclercq

    My first large tool was a craftsman radial arm saw at 110v it would stall and grab cutting anything bigger than a 2×4 . I converted it to 220v and i could go through a 2 x 12 and it wouldn’t even slow down. I had an neighbor that was a electrical engineer he explained that at 220v the motor was being hit at 2 phase angles that doubles the torque.

    Reply