Buying Advice

Sort by:

  • My Three Favorite Measuring Tools

    My 3 Favorite Measuring Tools

    If you’re going to do woodworking, you’re going to have to measure stuff. Here are the three measuring tools I use the most, and why I like them. # 1. FastCap Lefty/Righty 16′ Tape Measure. I’ve used lots of tape measures, and this is one of the best. The white disc on the face is

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • Reviewing the Infinity Dado Gauge

    Infinity Dado Gauge

    It’s easy to spend lots of time setting up a stackable dado head, searching for the perfect combination of rim blades, chippers, and shims to match the thickness of material you’re working with. Infinity Tools has come up with a good solution for this problem. Their Dado Gauge, $30, to be used in conjunction with

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • Reviewing the SensGard Zem Hearing Protectors

    SensGard’s Zem Hearing Protectors

      Scientific Hearing Protection – Noise Canceling Technology Without the Batteries. Industrialization brought loud noises into a relatively quiet world. The first hearing protection was right at hand: fingers or hands were employed to either plug or cover the ears. These early devices worked OK, but made it hard to work while they were being

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • FastCap’s Folding Chisels and More

    Back in my construction days, I struggled keeping a sharp chisel in my apron. First, it was an abusive environment that quickly dulled the chisel. Second, when the chisel was nice and sharp, the cutting tip quickly worked its way through my leather apron, leaving big holes behind. FastCap’s new Pocket Chisels solve this problem.

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • The SawStop Contractor Saw

    Cabinet Saw Features and Performance Plus Unmatched Safety. SawStop’s new Contractor Saw is the safest contractor saw on the market. That’s a given, considering that SawStop’s patented safety system is built into every saw it sells (see Safety section). While the safety system and the famous hot dog demos may be the stars of show,

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • Super General Saw Blade by Infinity Cutting Tools

    I’ve owned many different brands of “general purpose” saw blades over the years. All performed a variety of sawing tasks and all cost around $100. One aspect of general purpose blades that I really like is that I can leave one blade in my table saw for almost all of my cuts. This saves me

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • My Fave-5: Second Tier Tools

    This story presents five of my favorite second tier tools. I call them “second tier tools” because they aren’t essential tools you need to set up a shop. However, they are high impact tools that are wonderfully useful and really make a difference in my woodworking endeavors. I think of them as the perfect shop

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • Grizzly Jointer/Planer Combo

    Like peanut butter and jelly, a jointer and planer go together. If you really want to produce perfectly flat, straight, and square wood, you’ll need both. Having a hard time deciding which you should buy first? Go ahead, get ’em both in a combo machine. Grizzly’s Jointer/Planer Combination machine (#G0675), $1,195, does both planing and

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • Rockwell Jawhorse

    Who doesn’t need an extra pair of hands in the shop? The new Jawhorse, $177.76, might be just the answer for you.The Jawhorse, like the name implies, is a sawhorse with a set of jaws. The jaws open to 37″. Add a Plywood Jaw, $49.99, and you can open the jaw to 48″ and grab

    Read more »

    Read more »

  • Steel City 6″ Jointer

    Rock Solid 6″ Jointer. Here’s a tool you can take for granite, ’cause it is granite. The new 6″ Steel City Jointer(#40640), $1,200, has both a granite fence and a granite bed. Additionally, it comes with a spiral cutter head that sports four-sided carbide cutters. This type of cutter offers the benefit that if one

    Read more »

    Read more »

Discussion
  • (will not be published)

7 Responses to “Buying Advice”
  1. JAMES

    Hi, Im interested in purchasing a JET Drum Sander… Between the JET 1632 and 1836… I’m on the fence… Any thoughts on one vs the other… it is about $200 more for the 1836… also the 1836 is 2″ bigger and has the 1.75 hp vs the 1.5 on the 1632. I like the 1632 but hate the thought of a year down the road I should have spent the extra $200 for the 1836. Thank you for any advise/thoughts on which way I should go. My email is eilers2020@gmail.com. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi James. Power and capacity are important with a drum sander. Between the two that you are looking at, I would lean toward the 1836. Before you pull the trigger, I’d also suggest taking a look at this one: https://amzn.to/2Lj2gCh. The same people who designed the Jet drum sanders left to start SuperMax, and these guys know what they are doing. George has one in his shop and loves it. It’s a very impressive machine, and roughly the same price as the Jet 1836.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  2. CLINTON

    where do i start? i am wanting to make nice things not for money just to keep me busy. I have ran big saws chainsaws ect. not small equipment. I have a good table saw band saw router. It is overwhelming to me.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello Clinton,

      I would start with one tool at a time. For me, the best place to start would be by mastering your table saw. Make a few boxes out of inexpensive wood. Experiment with different joinery techniques; butt joints, miters, splines, biscuits, etc. Once you feel like you have the hang of that, move to the band saw. Build a couple bandsaw-centric projects like a reindeer https://www.wwgoa.com/video/post-haste-project-how-to-make-wooden-christmas-reindeer-010244/. If you can get the hang of making those reindeer, and they are not that hard, you will be well on your way to mastering the bandsaw. Then move to the router, and so on. We have a section of free plans for beginner woodworkers that you might want to check out as well: https://www.wwgoa.com/projects/beginner-woodworking-projects/.
      The trick is to start slow and be patient with yourself. We all start out by making some firewood in our early projects. It’s fun to learn, and you’ll be making “keepers” before you know it.

      Cheers,

      Paul
      WoodWorkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  3. Fred Savoy

    Want to buy a corded Miter Saw , looked at Dewalt 780 12″ < Jet 12" , Kaypex Festool 10' . Could you please let me know which corded Miter Saw to buy ?And if any other good ones to look at Thank You , Fred

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Fred. Those are all good options. You might want to also take a look at this one, which is what I have: https://amzn.to/2HUJu1K
      In my opinion it delivers cut quality that is on par with the Kapex saw, although the Kapex is a smooth operating saw and people who own them seem to really like them. My choice came down to the DW 780 vs. the Bosch Glide. I went with the Bosch mainly because of the space savings vs. the 780. The glide mechanism is efficient and doesn’t require as much space behind the saw, which is nice in my small shop. I was able to upgrade my 10″ miter saw without re configuring my benches.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply