Buying Advice

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  • Reviewing the Performax 22-44 Plus Drum Sander

    Jet 22-44 Plus Drum Sander

    I enjoy having the chance to write up the new products I see, but what those reviews lack, is any kind of long term testing. I love having the chance to use a tool for a while, then write about it. This is the case with the Performax 22-44 Plus Drum Sander. I’ve had one

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  • ask wwgoa

    Shop Coat for Dust

    “I have recently had pulmonary issues, making dust my arch enemy. Is there a shop coat that is made of a material like Tyvek that would resist dust adhering to it, as well as being light weight and washable?” Submitted by: billp48 WWGOA Editor Response: The closest thing I’ve seen to what you’re describing is

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  • Reviewing the General Mini-Lathe Duplicator

    General’s Mini-Lathe Duplicator

    If you’re concerned that your turning skills may not be adequate to make perfect duplicate spindles, General International has your problem solved. Their new Mini-Lathe Duplicator, $200, is specifically designed to easily fasten to most mini-lathes with cast bedways, and allow you to make duplicate spindles from either an existing turning, or from a pattern.Like

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  • Delta Midi Lathes

    The newest Delta midi lathe pack big features. Have a look, first, at the Midi Lathe 46-460, $599. Electronic variable speed on this machine allows you to dial in the rpms, from 250-4000. There’s no easier way to change speed on a lathe than electronic variable speed. It’s uncommon to see such a low rpm

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  • Reviewing DeWalt Miter and Table Saw Blades

    DeWALT Miter and Table Saw Blades

    Is DeWALT now on the cutting edge? They appear to be with their new line of table saw and miter saw blades. While it’s always difficult to test the quality of cutting tools, it looks like DeWALT did a nice job on these blades. The cuts they were making in their AWFS booth, in hardwoods,

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  • Reviewing the Router Table Box Joint Jig

    Rockler Box Joint Jig

    The new Router Table Box Joint Jig from Rockler, $79.99, looks easy to use. Once it’s secured on your router table (the table must have a 3/4″ miter slot), an aluminum index key is used for positioning. The right angle backer acts like a miter gauge to guide the material past the router bit. The

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  • Reviewing Fast Caps Artisan Accent caps

    FastCap’s Accent Caps

    The look of a pinned mortise and tenon joint is classic. FastCap has provided a new way to achieve this time tested look. Their Artisan Accent caps look like an ebony pin that you’ve carefully tapped into place, cut, and sanded, but are significantly easier to use. Start by tapping a recess using a 5/16″

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  • Reviewing the Grizzly G0700 Table Saw

    Grizzly Sliding Table Saw – Amazing Price

    Grizzly has again done something that they’re great at making what looks like an amazing tool at what I know is an amazing price. Their new G0700 table saw, $2,795, is a 10″ sliding table saw with a 5 hp motor and built in scoring blade. And, unlike some sliding saws, this saw will accept

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  • Using the Feather Guard Router Table Guard

    Feather Guard Router Table Guard

    The new Feather Guard from Sommerfeld Tools, $24.90, is a two-for-one deal. It serves as both a feather board and a bit guard. It works great for jobs like raised panels, affectively covering even massive horizontal panel raisers. And instead of setting my table up with two feather boards, one on the infeed side and

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  • Using Geckos Toes to Keep Your Hose Organized

    Gecko’s Toes for Air Hose Holder

    Keeping an air hose neatly stored in the shop can be a problem. It’s not uncommon for it to end up in a rat’s nest on the floor and you’ve got to unravel it each time you need to use it. If you want to get better organized, add Gecko’s Toes to your shop. This

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Discussion
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7 Responses to “Buying Advice”
  1. JAMES

    Hi, Im interested in purchasing a JET Drum Sander… Between the JET 1632 and 1836… I’m on the fence… Any thoughts on one vs the other… it is about $200 more for the 1836… also the 1836 is 2″ bigger and has the 1.75 hp vs the 1.5 on the 1632. I like the 1632 but hate the thought of a year down the road I should have spent the extra $200 for the 1836. Thank you for any advise/thoughts on which way I should go. My email is eilers2020@gmail.com. Thank you!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi James. Power and capacity are important with a drum sander. Between the two that you are looking at, I would lean toward the 1836. Before you pull the trigger, I’d also suggest taking a look at this one: https://amzn.to/2Lj2gCh. The same people who designed the Jet drum sanders left to start SuperMax, and these guys know what they are doing. George has one in his shop and loves it. It’s a very impressive machine, and roughly the same price as the Jet 1836.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  2. CLINTON

    where do i start? i am wanting to make nice things not for money just to keep me busy. I have ran big saws chainsaws ect. not small equipment. I have a good table saw band saw router. It is overwhelming to me.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello Clinton,

      I would start with one tool at a time. For me, the best place to start would be by mastering your table saw. Make a few boxes out of inexpensive wood. Experiment with different joinery techniques; butt joints, miters, splines, biscuits, etc. Once you feel like you have the hang of that, move to the band saw. Build a couple bandsaw-centric projects like a reindeer https://www.wwgoa.com/video/post-haste-project-how-to-make-wooden-christmas-reindeer-010244/. If you can get the hang of making those reindeer, and they are not that hard, you will be well on your way to mastering the bandsaw. Then move to the router, and so on. We have a section of free plans for beginner woodworkers that you might want to check out as well: https://www.wwgoa.com/projects/beginner-woodworking-projects/.
      The trick is to start slow and be patient with yourself. We all start out by making some firewood in our early projects. It’s fun to learn, and you’ll be making “keepers” before you know it.

      Cheers,

      Paul
      WoodWorkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  3. Fred Savoy

    Want to buy a corded Miter Saw , looked at Dewalt 780 12″ < Jet 12" , Kaypex Festool 10' . Could you please let me know which corded Miter Saw to buy ?And if any other good ones to look at Thank You , Fred

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Fred. Those are all good options. You might want to also take a look at this one, which is what I have: https://amzn.to/2HUJu1K
      In my opinion it delivers cut quality that is on par with the Kapex saw, although the Kapex is a smooth operating saw and people who own them seem to really like them. My choice came down to the DW 780 vs. the Bosch Glide. I went with the Bosch mainly because of the space savings vs. the 780. The glide mechanism is efficient and doesn’t require as much space behind the saw, which is nice in my small shop. I was able to upgrade my 10″ miter saw without re configuring my benches.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply