Woodworking Blog Posts, Articles & Videos to Build Your Skills

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  • How to Cross Cut with a Router

    So you’re working on a project where you need to cut a big wide slab, perhaps a table or a bench, and you say to yourself “how can I cut this cleanly in such a way that I don’t have to spend the rest of my life sanding the end grain smooth?”. You are correct

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  • Pocket Hole Joinery: Beyond Face Frames

    Leg to rail construction is a very common part of building furniture. There are lots of ways the joints can be created, but few are as quick and easy as pocket holes. And, there’s plenty of strength in a pocket hole joint. It’s common for a leg to rail joint to have a reveal, an

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  • Adding a Slot to Install Table Top Fasteners

    When it comes time to install the top on a table, it is important to come up with an approach that allows the table top to expand and contract freely with seasonal changes in humidity. If we don’t accommodate this movement, bad things are bound to happen. The table top could crack, or the movement

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  • Do Nails Really Help?

    Every once in a while I take some flak for not using nails or screws in my joinery, and for using pocket holes to join face frames. Let’s debunk a few myths. Today’s glues are stronger than the wood you’re putting together, provided the joinery is good. When you have good joinery, meaning no slop

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  • Spraying Latex Paint with HVLP Gun

    If you don’t enjoy brushing on latex paint, or if you are not able to achieve the level of quality in your painting that you’d like, then you should try spraying latex paint with HVLP equipment. Many people who are proficient at spraying clear finishes such as lacquer, poly, shellac, etc., are surprised to learn

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  • Assembling a Waterfall Table Miter

    Live edge and waterfall tables are extremely popular. Making a waterfall table involves mitering the slab, and then gluing the miter together. These are typically large slabs and big miters. And, of course, you’re not make a four-sided frame. You’re making a three-sided U. That means that conventional clamping techniques probably aren’t going to work.

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  • Making a Continuous Grain Drawer Front

    Have you ever seen a table with a drawer featured as part of the apron, and the grain of the apron flows through the drawer face as if it were cut directly out of the apron without disturbing the surrounding wood? Could it be a magic trick, or are some craftsmen just that superior? Well

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  • Torching Wood

    Everything old becomes new again! For instance, using a propane torch to char the surface of a piece of wood, changing its color. Torching wood is something that has been around for a really long time. It’s an interesting way to change a wood’s color without using stain or dye. Making it happen Torching wood

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  • Filling Knots with Epoxy

    Some of the most amazing pieces of wood are the ones that have “defects.” Defects could be spalting (mold), small checks, bark inclusions or, in this case, a huge hole. Sure, we could cut around those things and eliminate them, but I’m a huge fan of including this character in the final piece. I think

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  • Cutting Aluminum with a Table Saw

    As many of us build a tool arsenal that is primarily intended for working with wood, we occasionally come across projects involving metal. Many of these could benefit from the speed and precision of our woodshop equipment, but you might be unsure if it’s safe to work metal with your woodworking tools. One of the

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Discussion
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8 Responses to “Woodworking Blog Posts, Articles & Videos to Build Your Skills”
  1. Steve

    Not a comment, but a question- Have you ever used pear wood for a project? What are its properties, and does it have a nice grain pattern? What would be a recommended finish? Obviously, it would need to be a small project (bandsaw box, jewelry box, etc.) because there’s not much usable wood in most pear trees that I’ve seen. Thanks for any info you might pass along.

    Reply
  2. david

    if I was to cut a tree down,& wanted to use it for flooring. How long should it dry? Also could take a branch and cut 1/2 or3/4 inch slices of the branch and use it as flooring. thanks

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi David. You should get a good moisture meter and be sure that it is dry to the point of stabilization. In my shop in MN that typically means 8-10% depending on the time of year and the conditions. You don’t want to install flooring that hasn’t fully dried or you could experience problems. I would not recommend using limb wood for lumber since it is under stress and notoriously unstable. I would use only the trunk wood.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  3. Des Miscamble

    interesting- but how about skills regarding Scroll Saws? I have a Baumr-AG scroll saw ss16 arriving very soon – i have some experience

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  4. Kurt

    What product would you recommend to keep bark on a slab of wood before I use it for a cnc project.Then to seal it after it is done
    .

    Reply