Finishing

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  • Create a Crackle Finish on Wood

    Create a Crackle Finish on Wood

    A crackle finish on wood is something that can happen naturally over time or something you can do to a woodworking project right away. George Vondriska takes you step by step through the process and shows you how to achieve this weathered look using hide glue and two contrasting paint colors. Liquid Hide Wood Glue

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  • Super Finishing for Turning

    Super Finishing for Turning

    George Vondriska demonstrates the best way to apply a simple finishing mixture to a bottle stopper that is durable and will give the piece a proper shine. While the bottle stopper is still on your lathe, you can dab on light layers of thin-viscosity CA wood glue and linseed oil. Titebond Instant Wood Glue provided

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  • Finishing Tips

    An “Authentic” Arts and Crafts Finish

    There is actually no single, authentic, “Arts and Crafts finish,” rather many different schools of thought and technique that comprise the totality of the discipline. It seems that people are looking for that radiant, reddish chocolatey finish when uncovering an antique Stickley chair at a garage sale. In my research, I found the original Stickley

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  • How Sanding Affects Your Stain Color

    How Sanding Affects Your Stain Color

    Believe it or not, the most important step in the finishing process is sanding. George Vondriska and Matt Newborg show you how different sand paper grit can affect the final stain color of your woodworking projects.

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  • Getting Finish in Detailed Areas

    Getting Finish in Detailed Areas

    For your more intricate woodworking projects, applying finish to the smallest nooks and crannies can be a difficult task, so let George show how you can make adding sheen to your piece hassle-free. He’ll demonstrate two different ways to achieve a similar outcome, both of which you can do with materials you’ll find at your

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  • Fire Hazards from Furniture Oil

    Fire Hazards from Furniture Oil

    Furniture oil is a great finish to use on your woodworking projects because of its ease of use and beautiful luster. However, if the rag you use to apply it is not disposed of properly, it can quickly become a fire hazard. Find out what steps to take to avoid an accidental fire from furniture

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  • Stain Made From Beet & Onion

    Stain Made From Beet and Onion

    Beets and onions are great salad ingredients but did you know you can make wood stain from them, as well? George Vondriska teaches you the basics of how to extract color from these vegetables and get tips on using other plants for making your own wood stains.

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  • Shellac as a Turning Finish

    Shellac as a Turning Finish

    Watch Dave Munkittrick demonstrate how to apply finish to a turned project right on the lathe. See what he adds to the shellac for a foolproof protective finish for nearly any woodturning project.

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  • Shellac-Priming Edges

    Shellac-Priming Edges

    MDF is a great surface for paint, but the factory-cut edges can look fuzzy or dull after painting. George Vondriska teaches you a simple two-step shellac-priming process to get great-looking painted MDF edges every time.

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  • Top Coat Overview

    Top Coat Overview

    There are LOTS of options for top coating your projects, and the choices can be very confusing. This video breaks top coat finishes into various categories, and explains advantages and disadvantages of individual finishes. It’ll help make choosing finish for your next project a lot easier.

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Discussion
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11 Responses to “Finishing”
  1. jungy123

    Is there a way to get stain to penetrate all the way through small strips of wood? I want to turn a segmented bowl and need the stain fairly consistent throughout.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello. I’ve never attempted this, but if you soak the wood in the stain overnight it might penetrate all the way through. You also might be able to accelerate this by applying vacuum pressure to a sealed bag. https://amzn.to/2ybUmTy
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello. Thanks for your question. Can you explain what you are wanting to accomplish?
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  2. iansshop

    I accidentally applied Danish oil on a cutting board, what is the best way to remove it so I can apply a food safe oil?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello. I don’t know of any way to do this. What I would do is this:
      – Scrub it vigorously with dish soap and hot water now, removing any traces of Danish Oil from the surface- Let it sit 40 – 50 days- Scrub again as in step one, in case any Danish Oil seeped to the surface. – Let it dry.- Apply a couple coats of butcher block conditioner, or whatever finish you want to apply
      I would consider it ready to use, and food safe at that point. Danish oil cures in 30 days and is considered to be food safe at that point. The additional 10-20 days can increase your confidence that it has cured. After two scrubbings there won’t be any Danish oil at the surface, so food will not come into contact with it. The butcher block conditioner will further seal it.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  3. panoramalatin

    Ticket 21888
    Would like to know the best way to finish wood that will be outdoors. Pine as well as hardwood.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Jose,

      Thank you for your patience. In response to your question-

      I would suggest using a good quality deck sealer. If you have a good paint store near you, you can go there and get some good specific product recommendations. It seems like you really get what you pay for with deck sealer, so don’t try to go too cheap.

      Sincerely,

      Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  4. BETH

    I need to refinish cabinets in a church kitchen. They’re a dark stain now and they want a lighter stain. Can veneer be stripped and restained? This is going to be a big job due to repairs needing to be done. Any advice will be appreciated.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Beth. Thanks for your question. With a focus that is primarily on building new woodworking projects, we don’t have enough experience or expertise with refinishing to provide you with sound guidance.
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply