Gluing and Clamping

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  • Veneering Woodworking Projects with Clamps

    A Guide to Veneering Wood: Part 2

    This is the second part of a three-part story, each showing a different way of applying veneer to a substrate (Click here to read part one). This story focuses on using clamps, cauls and wood glue to do the work. The same essentials are true using this technique for veneering. Veneer always needs to be

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  • Veneering Woodworking Projects with Contact Cement

    A Guide to Veneering Wood: Part 1

    This is the first in a three-part story, each showing a different way of applying veneer to a substrate. When veneering wood, it is important to remember a couple of things. First, and foremost, veneer always needs to be counterbalanced, meaning, ALWAYS apply veneer to both sides of the substrate. When glue is applied between

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  • End Joining Long Boards

    End Joining Long Boards

    This trick is also great for clamping together all kinds of odd shaped hard-to-clamp joints, and useful a when you need a longer clamp than you have. The Problem. Every so often we are all faced with a “how the heck do I clamp this” situation. I was recently building a very large boat shaped

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  • Chair Repair Done Right

    Chair Repair Done Right

    Few pieces of furniture get more abuse than a chair. That’s because chairs have to solve two contradictory problems; they must be light enough to be mobile but strong enough to hold the shifting weight of its occupant. Light joints, big loads and constant movement add up to a lot of wear and tear on

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  • ask wwgoa

    Repairing an Old Chair

    “George, I’m trying to repair an old chair that needs some type of filler to save the end of the tenon. I don’t think regular wood filler would hold up. They are not completely bad, but have some chips and splits. If you have a suggestion I would be thankful.” I’m throwing this one to

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  • ask wwgoa

    Why are There 3 Titebonds?

    “Nice article about 4 glues. But why are there three “Titebonds”? When do you use “Titebond II”? Aside from costs, is there ever an advantage of “Titebond” over “Titebond III” or “Titebond II”? Or can I simply use “Titebond III” for all my furniture projects?” WWGOA Editor Response: Titebond II is Type II water resistant.

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  • glue to stick with

    4 Glues to Stick With

    There is a boat load of great wood glue in the market place, and this can be confusing. This story will help you narrow your arsenal down to four must-have types of glue, and tell you why you need them, and where you’ll use them. Here are the four go-to glues in my shop. Yellow

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  • get glue in tight spots

    Get Glue in Tight Spots

    My woodworking business includes a fair amount of repair work. Often, I’m confronted with how to force glue into a hairline crack or a bit of loose veneer. I’ve tried using old business cards but that’s like spreading glue with a wet noodle. I finally found the answer in metal shim stock I use to

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  • Preventing Clamp Scars

    Preventing Clamp Scars

    Dress for Success – Preventing Clamp Scars. I’m often asked to repair furniture for friends and family. I guess they figure if I can build a chair, I ought to be able to repair one as well. Handscrews are my clamp of choice when it comes to fixing a split spindle or leg. Because I’m

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  • Use Chamfers to Hide a Poorly Aligned Panel Glue-Up

    Small chamfers fix a gluing mistake.I’m under the gun. This small end table is the perfect gift for an old college friend, but I only have a couple of days left to complete the task. The only thing left before finishing is to square up and sand the top. Aaaagh! In my haste, I haven’t

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Discussion
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2 Responses to “Gluing and Clamping”
  1. PATRICK

    What is the best way to fill a crack in a log, so it can be turned. Its not a large crack but its almost the length of the log.

    Reply