Cabinet Making

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  • Making the Tail of Sliding Dovetail Joint

    Making the Tail of Sliding Dovetail Joint

    Sliding dovetail joints are super strong. Master woodworker George Vondriska shows you how to set up and rout dovetails on a router table.

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  • Leveling Edge Banding With A Belt Sander

    Leveling Edge Banding with a Belt Sander

    Plywood edgebanding is best applied slightly wide and then sanded flush using a belt sander. Woodworking expert Bruce Kieffer shows you how to do this type of belt sanding without sanding through the plywood veneer or gouging the panel.

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  • Concentric Variable Spaced Dovetails

    Concentric Variable Spaced Dovetails

    Dovetails are widely viewed in the woodworking world as a mark of premium craftsmanship. Cutting them with variable spacing creates a strong visual appeal, and the appearance of a hand-cut approach. Master woodworker George Vondriska demonstrates how to use a router, dovetail jig and guide block to make concentric variable spaced dovetail joints without the

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  • Climb Cutting on a Dovetail Jig

    Climb Cutting on a Dovetail Jig

    Router bit tearout is a nasty problem when you’re cutting dovetails. So master woodworker George Vondriska shows you how to avoid this devastating problem when completing your woodworking projects by using a technique on a dovetail jig called climb cutting.

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  • Checking Joint Quality

    Checking Joint Quality

    Good joinery starts with surfaces that mate perfectly without use of clamp pressure. If excessive clamping pressure is used to pull the joint together, it will create stress on your woodworking project that can cause distortion or even splitting to occur. Master woodworker George Vondriska explains how to incorporate a “dry run” into your process

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  • Office in a Closet Part 4: Finishing and Installing

    Time to wrap this office project up by finishing and installing the components. Finish and cabinet assembly: Apply finish to all components. I used a water based poly acrylic product to provide a nice looking durable finish. Set cabinets in place. Be sure they are level, and use shims if necessary. Scribe your face frame

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  • Building an Office in a Closet

    Office in a Closet Part 3: Build and Install the Desktop

    Part 1 of this story worked through design and carcase construction. Part 2 covered doors and drawers. Now we’re ready to construct the tops and shelves. If you are building this desk as a built-in, sandwiching the desktop between two walls, then the top is the trickiest part of this project because you will have

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  • Gang Cutting Edge Strips to Length

    Gang Cutting Edge Strips to Length

    It’s not often that you’ll need this trick, but when you do, the time you’ll save will be tremendous. The idea hit me the other day while I stood in front of my miter saw chopping multiple lengths of shelf edging one after another. Oh the boredom! Let’s say you need to make a whole

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  • Routed Half-Blind Dovetail Drawers

    Routed Half-Blind Dovetail Drawers: Part 2

    In part one of this article I showed you how a half-blind router dovetail jig works, and how to size your drawer parts for routing in the jig. In this final installment, I will explain using the jig to rout the joints, and then how to assemble the drawers. Boards must be correctly oriented and

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  • ask wwgoa

    Removing a Raised Panel and Saving the Frame

    “Do you know of a procedure for removing a panel from the rails and stiles of a standard raised panel cabinet door constructed with cope and stick joinery, in order to replace it with a glass panel. I can’t figure out how to make a square opening in the corners on the back side in

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Discussion
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5 Responses to “Cabinet Making”
  1. jan.berrios2010

    Can someone help me determine the best material to use to make a stone top kitchen cart? I am not sure if I will be painting it white to match my cabinets or staining it dark to contrast, but I want to make sure that I use the right material that will hold up to being rolled around and the 30-40 lb granite slab I will be topping it with. I am a relatively new woodworker and this will be the biggest/most finished project I have undertaken. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Jan. Any common cabinetmaking material will hold up fine with a 40 pound weight on top of it. Plywood, solid wood, MDF would all be good options.
      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply