WWGOA’s Top 10 of 2017

With 2018 just around the corner, WWGOA has taken some time to look back at your favorite articles and videos from the last year. We’ve picked out our most popular woodworking topics of 2017 for you to check out below!

1. WOOD JOINTS: WHICH WOODWORKING JOINTS SHOULD YOU USE?

There are tons of woodworking joint options available, how do you know which one to choose? We’ve compiled a list of 11 of the most popular woodworking joints and discuss which joints are best for what projects.

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2. ROUTER WOODWORKING BASICS: HOW TO USE A ROUTER

Want to use a router, but don’t know where to start? Learn how to use a router with these router woodworking techniques and tips.

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3. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A JOINTER AND PLANER

Beginning woodworkers all ask this basic question; what is the difference between a jointer and a planer? The answer is simple, a lot! Read more to figure out which machine is better for your own shop.

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4. DO I REALLY NEED AN IMPACT DRIVER?

I’m going to spoil the ending. Yes you do need an impact driver, right away. Stop reading. Go to store. Buy an impact driver. Thank me later. If you feel the need to understand why, read on.

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5. 5 EXPENSIVE, BUT WORTH EVERY PENNY WOODWORKING TOOLS

The tools in this list might seem expensive, quirky, and even redundant, but stay with me and I’ll prove their worth. Believe me, now that these woodworking tools are in my shop, I wish I’d invested in them earlier.

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6. FLATTENING LARGE WOOD SLABS WITH A ROUTER

Wood slabs can make great tables. The problem is getting them flat. The coolest slabs are usually too big to go through a planer or sander, and end grain slabs shouldn’t go through a planer anyway. Fortunately, there is an easy way to flatten any oversized board using a shop-made jig and a router. Here’s how.

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7. D.O.G. SIMPLE APPROACH FOR DUST COLLECTION DUCTING

Dust collection duct design is a complex science, and I am going to intentionally oversimplify it because I think the basics can be lost in the gory detail, and by following a few basic guidelines it is easy enough to achieve air flow that is “good enough”. Toward my goal of oversimplification, I offer the “D.O.G. Simple” method of small shop dust collection ductwork design.

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8. EBONIZING WOOD

The next time you’re working on a project that calls for a dark, opaque accent that looks like ebony, try ebonizing wood for the right look. It’s a fairly simple process, but works better on some woods than others.

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9. BELT SANDER TIPS

Learn how to tame your belt sander and get the most bang for your buck with this video. Whether you’re thinking about purchasing one, or just want some tips on how to use it, we’ve got you covered!

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10. SET UP YOUR MITER SAW FOR PERFECT CUTS

If you’ve got a miter saw in your shop you probably rely on it for perfectly square cuts, and maybe for cutting angles, too. Follow these simple set up tips to tune up your saw so it’s singing an accurate song.

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What was your favorite woodworking tip from WWGOA in 2017? Let us know in the comments below!


Discussion
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4 Responses to “WWGOA’s Top 10 of 2017”
  1. Marcus from Barbados

    The best for me was the barrel box episode. I make urns for cremation and have been able to do two variations from that single project (one quite by accident). Thank you it has improved the quality of my product offering. // Thanks also for solving the Mitre (Yes we use correct English) cut for my box. The guides were not properly aligned. I made the error of following a suggestion I saw in a video where it was suggested that you insert a sheet of paper to create a very small gap between the blade and the ceramic guides. Big error! Have a blessed New Year!

    Reply
  2. jeff jefferson

    Thanks for the amazing post . this really take the woodworking to the next level and help anyone become a pro.
    The way this piece is disgned truly makes it very easy to build and also has great style.
    I personally got started about 3 months ago and already creating my own projects and did it all thanks to the help
    of a set of 16,00. woodworking plans that is so easy to follow , literally anyone can do this.
    I’m sure this will provide tremendous value to anyone that sees this . You can check it out here: https://tinyurl.com/y8pkuafb

    Reply
  3. trapshooter

    George, this is Darwin but logged in as trapshooter. I watched the webinar last week through my email. I had ask the question about friction plugs for turning on the lathe. You were asking about how I was mounting those to the lathe. There wasn’t enough time to get an answer.
    I am a newbie to woodturning and learning by doing. In my woodworking magazine there was a project for making pump n grind salt and pepper mills. The procedure was to take a 2″ square block of wood drill a hole on the drill press then mount that block of wood to the lathe using friction plugs. It was suggested to mount the plugs on the lathe with a four prong star hub into the head stock and a live center at the tail stock.
    My friction plugs were not true enough to give me, what I consider, a true turning application. Now, after that learning experience, I then made my block a bit longer so I could mount to the lathe with a jaw set up or variable chuck at the head stock and live center on tail stock. When I got the shape I wanted and the length I cut off the end in the head stock and had my finished piece.
    My question at the time was; How does a person get a true friction plug to turn with. It look so simple to make the friction plug, but in reality , for me, it wasn’t simple.
    Thanks, Darwin

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Darwin. Whether you’re turning between centers, or using a chuck, the lathe should be able to give you a perfectly round piece. If not, it could be that the chisels are dull and the material is flexing away from them under cutting pressure. Or, the bearings on the lathe could be going, so the spindle of the lathe itself isn’t running true.
      Thanks
      George-WWGOA

      Reply