WWGOA LIVE! June 2016

Thanks for the great questions for our June LIVE event. We answered a lot of questions, and ran a bunch of tools in this session, include a biscuit joiner, lathe, Domino, and even did some resawing on the table saw. Enjoy!


Discussion
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129 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! June 2016”
  1. Bob Conway

    George, what is the difference between using a Domino and Beadlock for joints? Other than the shape.
    Thanks Bob

    Reply
  2. Mary Wilson

    I had to have a cedar tree cut down. It was one my dad had planted 60 years ago. I was wondering if you have any patterns/videos for making a small desk out of it. I hate to see it go to waste. Any ideas?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      A great way to check for content on WWGOA is to use the search window in the upper right hand corner of the page. You can use it to search for projects, techniques, tool reviews…..

      Reply
  3. Carl Timko

    I am a novice woodworker at best, trying to turn pen blanks. Lately, nearly half of the blanks (mostly santos rosewood) have been breaking. Is it because of the speed I am turning them? Are the tools not sharp enough? Or is it because I don’t see all that well (I lost most of my sight three years ago)?

    Reply
    • David Krueger

      I think could one of two things. The tool is not sharp enough or you are trying to cut the wood too fast trying to take too much at a time. Rosewood is beautiful but fragile. Good luck.

      Reply
  4. ALLAN K

    As a hobby, I do A LOT of refinishing and occasionally I get to do a dining table that has the wood grain running diagonally and lengthwise also. My question is: how should I sand it properly? Does it really matter? It would be very time consuming to sand each section separately.

    Reply
    • Ryan

      I think an orbital sander would be your best bet. Use the orbital down, as close as you can get, to 400 grit. After that you can use finer grits on your finish (by hand, or else with a power tool, the finish will be gone before you know it) as it won’t matter what direction you are going.

      Reply
    • Ryan

      Hand tools! They are cheap, and will teach you the patients and skill required, and are the legacy of today’s, power tool dominated art.
      So, a good tennon saw and a good ripping saw (value of about $70-$100 each) a nice set of chisels ($60 or so). A good bench to work on is a must with a bench vice, and clamps (even cheap clamps are often adequate). Of course some hand planes, a No.5 can get away with a lot, but a Jack Plane is good too for nice straight edges. A square, for marking cuts and checking planed edges for trueness. A bevel is a must for dove tails, although these days there is a lot of jigs that make it quicker, a bevel is moren handy universal too for rescribing scribing angles of all purposes. Where as a dovetail marking jig does only that. By all means, use your bevel to make your own dovetail jigs. A marking gauge is a must too. And some scrapers, handy tools for working against the grain and in curves and coves. With all that you can achieve almost anything, for a fair deal below $1000. With time and patience. Welcome to the art, it is beautiful and practical.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      There’s lots of buying advice on WWGOA.com Use the search window in the upper right hand corner and search “recommended tools.”

      Reply
  5. John Christy

    I have an oak table which has water damage that removed some of the finish. Now I’m wondering how can I tell what the manufacture used to finish the table?
    how can I tell if it is a varnish or shellac finish?

    Reply
  6. Dan

    I’m new to turning and was attempting to turn an 8 inch bowl. I have my tool rest adjusted to where the cutter is right at the middle of the bowl every minute or so my tool would grab and I would get popped in the face shield by the handle I changed the position of my carbide tool higher and lower with no difference. All said and done the bowl ended up exploding in pieces where the tool caught. Help any advice? Thanks

    Reply
  7. Roger Agne

    I am trying to match some rough cut cedar trim on my house. I read if you bend a few teeth on your band saw blade it will give you the rough cut look. How many teeth and how much can I bend them?

    Reply
  8. Kurt

    George, I have appx. 100bf of 4/4 rough cut Red Oak and some is case-hardened. I have increased the RH to 45% to try and get the edges to draw in more moisture. My question is “will increasing the RH to 45% be enough to repair the case-hardened oak” Thanks, Kurt

    Reply
  9. Jon

    have you had any experience using Jets 10in planer/jointer combo or should i get them not has a combo

    Reply
  10. MikeB

    Looking forward to the conversations!! My students make pens for the Freedom pen project and are having issues turning Black Palm and Red Palm blanks any suggestions?

    Reply
    • Catpower

      Palm is very hard to turn without self destructing. I use carbide cutters and it is still at least a 50% failure rate, but if you stabilize it with Cactus Juice or other stabilizing solutions it dramatically reduces the failure rate, but you still need to use very light pressure while cutting. The stabilizing is kind of a pain, but I built a vacuum chamber out of 4 inch PVC with a glue on cap on one end and the lid made out of 1/4 Plexiglass, wit a 1/8 MIPX 1/4 flare fitting to attach the vacuum hose to, and made a gasket out of PVC shower pan material. You will need a vacuum pump I am in the HVAC/R bidness so i had one, you might look at pawn shops and find a pretty good deal, JB or Robinair are good brands, but one thng that gets over looked is changing the oil, it needs to be changed every time it is used. Since I have stabilized the palm I haven’t had a blow out, so you might try that, it is one of the prettiest woods for pens though

      Good luck

      Reply
  11. Corie johnson

    Hey George love your work and videos thanks so much! My question is what’s the best way to book match a piece of quilted maple without a band saw? My band saw is not tall enough for the wood I’m wanting to cut. Thanks!

    Reply
  12. Eric

    My dining room table often has the finish soften on the top and leaves an off white mark after eating temperature hot things on our plates. What type of finish would you recommend using to prevent this from happening if I were to refinish the table?

    Reply
  13. pockethandyman

    Hi George. My first time joining in. Question: I installed an 8′ pine handrail outdoors. It has an unfortunate split running nearly it’s entire length. Should I reinforce the handrail laterally with deck screws? And how should the split be filled and hidden so it’s doesn’t continue to widen? Thanks!

    Reply
  14. Scott Voth

    Hi George, I’ve be using a small lathe to turn pens for a while. I’ve also built up a large assortment of exotic wood blocks for bowls. What Ii’m not comfortable with yet is mounting the blocks to the lathe. I remember in high school shop class about 40 years ago I used a paper joint to turn a large maple bowl. I’ve also used screws to mount the bowl to the faceplate. Can you offer some suggestions?

    Thank you
    Scott

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      There’s lots of buying advice on WWGOA.com Use the search window in the upper right hand corner and search “recommended tools.”

      Reply
  15. Dick

    Enjoy watching your videos on CNC work. I have been incorporating CNC carving into my furniture work and use it to do some of the basic shaping and to add accents to provide a regional style.

    Reply
  16. Darrell Milam

    I watched your resaw live. When I am resawing sometimes the saw pulls the wood through rapidly on its own and then bogs down. It also screeches when this happens. This might happen several times in the same board. Any idea why this is happening? Operator error? It tends to be in hard exotic wood. I am using a 1″ carbide resaw blade.

    Reply
  17. Jim

    What is better the straight 3 blade jointer or the multi carbide spiral jointer?

    Reply
  18. John L.

    I’m refinishing a dining room table for a friend. I have 3 coats of polyurethane on it. I was,thinking of knocking the dust & hairs out of it with 400 grit minimum. I was thinking of rubbing in Danish oil afterwards. Is that a good idea? It looks great to this point & I want to really knock it out. Thanks.

    Reply
  19. George Nolin

    What advice do you have for a dust collection system? Size of piping, collection unit, etc.

    Reply
  20. John Lowell

    Tks for the turning info. I have a 2″ sanding pad on a spinning axle that is not motorized. What is the correct way to use it? When I get it spinning against the wood, it does not seem to be doing much sanding. tks.

    Reply
  21. Dale Weiman

    I recently made an end grain cutting board from walnut, cherry and hard maple. Fortunalety I made some test pieces before putting on the minerial oil. I sanded the test pieces to 120, 180 and 220 grit. The hard maple turn almost the shade of the cherry on all 3 grits. What I am doing wrong? I know that end grain will turn darker but not to cherry. Could it be the hard maple I used? Thanks, Dale

    Reply
  22. Robert

    Is there a drill press guide that tells what speeds to use for different types of bits for an application. Example; Forstner bit vs Bradpoint vs Regular drill bit.

    Reply
  23. Oldtyme Woodworks

    Is there an inexpensive way to sharpen lathe tools to a good sharp edge? I have been looking at different bench grinders and sharpening setups like the Tormek. I don’t have a lot of money right now.

    Reply
  24. Robert

    2nd Question; Is there some sort of guide for router bit speeds for various applications and type of wood?

    Reply
  25. Doug Goldman

    Watching from Chetek, WI. I enjoyed the Lathe Extravaganza class you taught a number of years ago. Any chance you would consider running the class again?

    Reply
  26. Henry

    Comment on headlock vs domino joinery…..for the same size piece beadlock provides more glue surface so theoretically should offer a stronger joint

    Reply
  27. nava

    What’s the best way to calculate the cuts on a picture frame . Sometimes I use miter cut some time domino jointer ? Somtimes I use different size wood and
    I always spend way too long to figure it out ??? Help

    Reply
  28. Ken Morton

    Watching from Queensland, Australia – It’s a lovely sunny morning 🙂

    Reply
  29. matt

    can you talk about breadboard ends for large table tops? Is there a benefit to doing a large tenon the full length of the breadboard end vs. 3+ smaller tenons? Thanks!

    Reply
  30. nava

    I am watching from New Jersey and
    I can’t find the frame u made using the special glue that makes the paint looks old ?

    Reply
  31. j.chart

    I have a table saw and a chop saw I never can get a good 45 degree angle cuts, vermont

    Reply
  32. Jason

    From Pocatello, Idaho What is an easy and inexpensive way to prevent chatter when hollowing bowls or vases on a lathe?

    Reply
  33. John

    I need to strip, re-stain and refinish an oak front door and side lights that are currently finished with a medium oak stain and probably shellac. The door is about 30 years old. It is protected from the sun by a large covered front porch. What do you recommend as the best way to strip and refinish it.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Nope, I send them out to be sharpened. I did do some hand sharpening when I was teach for Peace Corps in Africa (hand-tool-only shop) but for me it’s best left to the pros.

      Reply
  34. jcrow60102

    Have a Bartley Grand Father Clock (Thomas Harland) Cherry wood,I built and stained aniline dye finish, what is the best Top coat, Clear lacquer or ?

    What should be done before the finish Top coat is applied

    Rub finish or spray finish, 3 coat or ?

    Have to add the finish as At time the dye dries up and gets the front panel a bit blotchy

    Thoughts thank you

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m a big fan of spraying lacquer. If you have the set up to do that, that’s what I’d recommend.

      Reply
  35. bwollard

    Watching from Houston Texas and thoroughly enjoy your broadcast. Well done George.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      We would like to let you know that your feedback has been forwarded to the proper department. Your comments are important to us and help with the development of our online video streaming community.

      Reply
  36. Maynard Robinson

    Your audio sounds like you are talking in a box and is very hard to hear the questions and answers. The echos make it hard to understand.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      We would like to let you know that your feedback has been forwarded to the proper department. Your comments are important to us and help with the development of our online video streaming community.

      Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Raynald. Do you mean sharpening the lathe chisel at about 46:20? If so, it’s a Trend diamond stone. They have a large variety of grits and sizes, with varying prices, and are available on Amazon, from Woodcraft, Peachtree USA, and other retailers.

      Reply
  37. Lolita

    Hello George! I love your workshop videos, I have begun some Cigar Box Projects (The Kalimba (thumba Piano), Guitar, Guitar Amps) etc.. Have your daughter done any other guitar projects?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Lolita. Nope, no new guitar projects for me and Ginny. The biggest guitar-related thing I’ve done recently was Build a Vet a Guitar last September. http://george165.wix.com/guitarbuild It’s a very fun event, and very rewarding. Glad to hear you’re moving down the instrument path. It’s a lot of fun.

      Reply
  38. Richard

    Do you know of away to strip the finish from a 100 year old table? I have tried Formby’s, Unistrip. & Goof off with no appreciable results. As far as sanding goes, it has taken me 7 hours using 50 grit sandpaper just to do the top of a 14″ X 23″ side table. The legs have a large amount of scroll work and I have no idea how to get into the fine areas. Any suggestions?
    R. Fulsom

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Richard. Thank you for your question. Unfortunately we do not focus on refinishing at WWGOA, so we don’t have any guidance for you on this topic. I know that some refinishers use the services of companies that have a dipping vat, which can quickly remove much of the old finish, even in the tight spots. Perhaps it is worth looking into something like this in your area.

      Reply