WWGOA LIVE! February 2017


One of our best WWGOA Live shows ever. There were a lot of great questions, thanks to our wonderful viewers. From finish for lathe work to choices for outdoor woods, we covered a lot of ground. Thanks to all who tuned in.

0:43 Turning finishes
3:05 Mortise a leg before or after a taper
3:40 Removing PSA sandpaper
5:40 Mitered corners and glue strength
8:25 Benchtop tool stand
12:08 Projects to advance woodworking skills
16:00 Second coat of stain didn’t come out well
17:47 Fastening rubber feet to a finished piece
20:36 Bandsaw or scrollsaw
24:03 Ridges on dado bottom
27:16 George’s necklace
30:13 Gluing stained wood
31:02 Woods for outdoor use
32:30 Brushless drivers
33:47 Good projects for using up redwood
34:10 Fret work in thin stock
36:20 Router and router table advice
38:40 Blade for resawing
40:10 Classes at Vondriska Woodworks
42:10 Long bow class
42:55 Inline sander for flattening?
44:32 Angle gauge for grinding chisels
46:00 Good material for cutting boards
47:00 Are parallel jaw clamps worth it?
49:55 Gluing veneer to sheet metal
52:45 Storing lumber
53:30 Dust collection on miter saws
54:54 Recommendation for sliding miter saw
56:39 Starter pins on router tables
1:01:30 George’s upcoming on the road schedule

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Discussion
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134 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! February 2017”
  1. Melody

    How do I fix the draw glides (wooden), on a dresser and chest? The guides are too narrow to hold the drawers in place.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Can you build the glides out so they’re a better fit for the drawers? Or, build out the sides of the drawers?

      Reply
  2. john glenn

    George, I have your CD’s “The Complete Woodworking Video Collection” but would like to know what finish you use on the lidded box and bowls.

    Reply
  3. rhukill61@gmail.com

    Bob @Paris ILL. Gorge should I mortise the leg on a table, be for or after I cut the taper?

    Reply
  4. John

    I recently bought some new sandpaper, won’t mention the brand, that had a sticky back to it that is advertised as making sanding easier and no slip. However I used it on my palm sander and when the piece wore out I peeled if off to replace it, and it took some of the sander rubber pad with it. The pad was heated as was the paper and it form a very tough bond. Have you experienced this, and a word of warning. Did I do something wrong.???

    Reply
    • karl

      Place a sheet of waxed paper between the pad and the sandpaper, although the Heat build up is still there so frequent changing of sandpaper is needed. The sandpaper will peel off easy. As George stated; Hook & latch sandpaper is a better alternative…

      Reply
  5. 1withthegrain

    I build a lot of raised panel cabinet doors using red oak. I use mitered corners with biscuits. I have noticed that the cut quality that I am getting on these joints is very good. A smooth shiny finish. I have yet to have any issues, but am I losing any mechanical strength here with the smooth joints in regards to glue penetration? Or are the biscuits doing all of the work? Should I go to a rougher cut blade?
    I am using a 80 tooth HATB blade 2 degree negative hook.

    Reply
  6. William Thurlby

    Thanks for doing this tonight George, any advice on what type of projects to produce and sell for a 1st year woodworker trying to work for themselves from home? Thanks

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Stick with projects that you know you’ll enjoy. That way you’ll be motivated to learn. Look through the projects on WWGOA and see if there’s anything there you like. Check out Pinterest, too, looking for items you’d like to have or build. Making something YOU want is a great motivator. WWGOA projects are here https://www.wwgoa.com/videos/woodworking-projects/

      Reply
  7. Todd Coburn

    Todd from Houston, TX! Hi George, how long should I wait after applying the first coat of stain on Pine before applying a 2nd coat? I re-used the staining pad the next day for coat number 2 and the finish did not come out smooth. I did use a wood conditioner prior to the first coat.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Don’t apply a second coat until the first is dry. Drying time will vary depending on your shop heat and humidity. I suggest a clean staining pad each for each coat.

      Reply
  8. Robert

    HI George Bob from Elk Grove Village here again, Love these monthly live broadcasts. My question is this. I recently made a fairly large DVD shelf unit for my son and daughter-in-law out of Red Oak. I had very specific size limitations to work with. I finished it with Watco, Danish Oil, and being a good woodworker I finished both sides of every piece. My problem is there was to be thin 3/16″ rubber feet on it to keep it just off their hardwood floors but the adhesive feet do NOT stick to the oil finish. Any suggestions? Adhesive, do I need to sand the finish off on the bottom? Any help would be appreciated.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Either look for feet that include a mechanical fastener; a screw or nail, or remove some of the finish, clean the foot up with denatured alcohol, and try 100% silicone caulk as an adhesive.

      Reply
  9. harryk54

    Hi George, I’m considered an intermediate woodworking and looking forward advance (love watching your show) My question is, I recently put together an oak coffee table witch required dadoes at the top of the 4×4 legs so the 1×6 sides fit into. Unfortunately I used a cheaper dado set and as a result I got rabbets that produced a jagged bottom I’m guessing because the chippers where not matched. Also, the sides that fit into the leg has a slight ridge, about a 1/16″ or so. How do approach getting the sides flush with the leg. the grain on the leg is perpendicular with the side board.

    I have since purchased a better grade dado set and I’m getting much better results. It was worth the cost.

    Thanks George.

    Harry Kubarek Superior, WI

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m not sure I’m picturing the problem, but it sounds like you either have to make the dado deeper, or sand the sides flush. You could deepen the dado with hand chisels, or by setting up your new dado and recutting them.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      If you want to cut thin stock, a scroll saw might be OK. But if you want to cut thick material a hand held jig saw would be a better alternative, until you’re ready for a bandsaw.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Very tough question to answer. It depends on what you like doing, what tools you have, what other woodworkers in your area are already doing….. My generic advice is to do something that other woodworkers can’t do so you have a corner on the market. It could be that you have a tool most other don’t have like a laser, CNC, or other…. Maybe you find a material few other woodworkers use. Maybe you have a skill that lets you make something quickly that would be labor intensive for others. Then, start exploring.

      Reply
  10. Shane

    Good evening George, Brand new member and brand new woodworker.. I am a DIY/Self-taught guy, breaking into the field, I have made bird feeders and picture frames looking to expand into other projects, do you have any recommended projects for entry level carpenters that would generate good rounded lessons in skills? Eventually my dream goal is work my full-time career, and expand my hobby into a part-time side business of cabinet making and fine wood creations.. Thank you so much You and WWGOA have been an absolute motivator in getting into this!

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Nope, there are other choices. A few are ipe, white oak, redwood, mahogany, jarrah

      Reply
  11. edh

    Should a home woodworker, hobbyist, worry about whether a drill driver is brushed or not brushed. The newest drill driver are coming out brushless. There are some good buys on brushed drill drivers and impacts combo kits.
    Ed in Calgary

    Reply
  12. George Bestpitch

    Have a ton of redwood. What’s a good project to make with the redwood? I have 2 x 4’s and 4 x 4’s mostly heartwood.

    Reply
  13. Chad Lohmeyer

    Hi! Looking for a good source (website, association…etc) to find rough wood suppliers in my state of Oklahoma or nearby states. Do sawmills only sell to “big” buyers? If sawmills accommodate hobbyists, what is the process and/or what to expect as far as choosing and purchasing?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Check with woodworkers in your area to find out where they’re getting wood. Once you find a sawmill give them a call and ask what kind of quantities they sell in. Then, dive in and place an order.

      Reply
  14. Ken Kobetsky

    I have a 14 inch band saw and would like to do a lot of re-sawing of 8″ to 10″tall stock to 1/2″ and 1/16” widths what kind of band saw blade the number of teeth and width of blade should I purchase

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Lots of good stuff out there….Kreg, Woodpecker, JessEm. For routers the Triton routers have a lot of great router table features, but there’s also nice stuff from Porter Cable, Milwaukee, DeWalt, and more. You really need to define a budget and shop with that in mind.

      Reply
  15. Fred

    Can solid wood be used for fretwork? How thin can it be and still not warp. Making an African mahogany grandfather clock.
    Fred Moates
    Cape Coral, FL

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m just not well versed in this. You might try the folks at PS Wood 800-939-4414. They have a background in scroll saw work.

      Reply
  16. katie

    Will you be offering any classes at your shop? I missed you last bowl turning class. Where do I sign up?

    Reply
  17. Tim

    I have neither the money nor the space for a drum sander. I have been toying idea of using an inline sander like body shops use for flattening door panels and table tops. What are your thoughts?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I think I’d stick with a belt sander and random orbit. Big table tops, I’d go with a 6″ RO as opposed to a 5″

      Reply
  18. James Dawson

    Where can I get an angle gauge like you use to set the grinder tool rest in the sharpening video?

    Thanks,
    Jim Dawson

    Reply
  19. Dennis

    I have a ton of older Hargrave bar clamps, is it worth the investment to add the newer parallel clamps to my shop? What’s the advantage.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I love parallel jaw clamps. They make it much easier to get a dead flat glue up.

      Reply
  20. Bob Priebe

    What adhesive would you recommend for gluing wood veneer to sheet metal. I am making a woodie pedal car for my granddaughter.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I think contact adhesive would work, but I’d check with an adhesive manufacturer to make certain.

      Reply
  21. Rick

    George, Loved your tip for finishing on the lathe with Linseed oil and super glue Sped finishing up immensely. Thanks!

    Reply
  22. Kelly

    I have a shop in my backyard, it has a wood stove in it. Live in Canada and it gets very cold here very cold here. I forgot I store a bunch of wood in my shop and only use a wood stove to heat will I have issues with wood movement with the variance betweenness hot and cold constantly

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I think you’d be better off storing the wood where conditions are consistent, either always warm or always cold, and bringing it into the shop as needed.

      Reply
  23. Steven

    Hi George, Steve From Melbourne Here, First time too, What types of timber can I use for Cutting Boards, something easy to work with and stable.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Cutting boards should be made from wood that is hard and close grained. In the North American hardwoods maple and cherry are great candidates. I’m not sure what woods in Australia would fill this bill.

      Reply
  24. Ski

    George, When will manufacturers be forced to standardize battery connections on DC Power tools as they are on 120 VAC and 220/240 AC tools?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t see that ever happening. Each manufacturer would prefer you buy their battery for their tool.

      Reply
  25. Paul

    What is your recommendation to purchase the best 12 “Sliding Miter Saw available? Festool Kapex 120 or Bosch dual-bevel glider GCM12SD or Dewalt dws780?

    Reply
  26. Johnny

    My neighbor says his Router Table has a pin on the table to start cuts. This doesn’t make sense to me since the pin would be in the way. You know what this is for?

    Reply
  27. Jeannie Grassi

    I love my Makita compound sliding miter saw. I hate the poor dust collection. Any way to catch all the stuff that goes flying that doesn’t get into my shop vac?

    Reply
  28. James Dawson

    The gauge I was referring to earlier is the gauge George put against the grinder wheel and set the angle of the tool rest to get the chisel at 25 or 30 degrees for grinding the bevel.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      A few things to keep in mind. As a rule, router bits are more readily available and cost less than shaper cutters. You can take the router out of a router table and use it hand held. Routers spin at a high rpm and work well even with small diameter bits. Shapers run at a lower rpm so don’t do well with small diameter two flute cutters, but usually have more power. If you’re looking at a production environment what the tool will run all day, a shaper is probably a better choice. For more versatility, a router table is a better choice.

      Reply
  29. Joseph

    Highlands Ranch, Colorado
    Thanks George! First time catching you live; what a treat.
    JOE

    Reply
  30. Edward

    Ed Straub from Conroe, TX, Why is cedar so hard to glue up, I have lately been scorching it with a burner and that seems to work?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’ve glued lots of cedar together without any trouble. In fact I have a bunch of cedar signs in my shop right now waiting for the next step. If you have a good joint, you should be able to simply glue things together.

      Reply
  31. Dick

    George:
    In response to the person that inquired about brushless motors, I offer the following: I first got introduced to brushless motors for my RC (radio Controlled) airplanes. In short, the brushless motors are more efficient. Since there are no brushes, that eliminates the friction that is introduced by the contact between the brushes and the commutator on the motor. Without the contact the rotor moves freely. Unlike a brushed motor, you cannot connect the DC power (positive and negative leads) directly to the motor. The brushless motor requires an electronic circuit that moves an electric field around the stator (simple analogy) causing the magnets on the rotor to be attracted or repelled by the “moving field”. The added advantage of the brushless motor is the fact that they are usually paired up with the newer technology batteries such as Lithium, Lithium Polymer (LiPo) etc. These battery technologies will not run down like a NiCd (nickel cadmium) or NiMH (nickel metal hydride), they will run full-bore until they virtually expire.

    I’m watching in York, PA

    Reply
  32. Jason

    Grew up on Long Island, NY.
    Recently moved to north jersey.
    Love watching these!
    Thanks!!!

    Reply
  33. Sophie

    I live in FL, in a smaller community 2-3 hours away from any woodworking stores or clubs. I am a busy mom, so driving long distances is a problem. Our local college does not offer woodworking, nor the college. Besides the internet, I have attempted to find someone to answer questions. This is especially a problem when I am in the middle of a project. I have even approached local retirees who wood work, but no luck. Everyone says, “sure”, but then nailing them down is tough. Any suggestions to get help?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Man, this is tough. Sorry it’s such a problem, and sorry that I don’t have a solution for you. All I can suggest is that you keep asking, hoping to find someone who will help you along. WWGOA now has a live chat function-I know that’s not the same as talking to a human-but we do try to turn questions around as fast as we can. Maybe that’ll be one resource for you.

      Reply
  34. Johnny

    Thank you George. Great program and thank you because now I understand the use of the router table pin. God Speed.

    Reply
  35. Sean

    Checking in from Southern California…first time watching a live show. It was very informative.

    Reply
  36. Craig

    Really enjoyed the live show from Scottsdale, AZ. My question is about using a router table. I was restoring a side table top for an outdoor swing. The table is three slats about 3″ each 5/8″ thick with the two outboard slats cut in a radius. I used red oak and needed to round off the outer edges. As I attempted to round off the radius ends, which were end grain, it started ok but when I reached the middle of the radius, the bit would chatter and take chunks out of the end grain. I one case, it flung the whole slat across the workshop at about 100mph. Can a router be used on end grain when the board is cut with a radius across the end grain or should I resort to just sanding it off?

    Reply
  37. Steve Parsons

    Are your products such as DVD’S etc available to residents from Australia who are premium members

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Steve. We currently only ship products in the U.S. and Canada to avoid high international shipping charges to our customers and to allow faster delivery of our content. We are currently exploring ways to make this an available option.

      Reply
      • rudy

        What about making them available as downloads? Or put them on a USB drive? This might also make things easier for more customers.

        More and more computers, like mine, now come without a DVD player. When I purchased a set of DVD’s from you I had to use my wife’s computer’s DVD player to copy the files to a USB drive which I then copied to my laptop computer. Actually, I left the files on the USB drive which I can take with me to use on another computer when I travel.

        Direct download of large video files could be taxing on some people’s internet connection but very doable for many customers. I would bet the shipping on a USB drive would be minimal. And now that many TV’s come with bluetooth connection ability, customers could play the video’s on their computer and beam it to their TV if they want a larger picture.

        Just my $0.02 worth.

        Reply
        • Customer Service

          Hi, Rudy. We would like to let you know that your feedback has been forwarded to the proper department. Your comments are important to us and help with the development of our online video streaming community.

          Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Morris.Different router lifts support different routers and most of the time the supported routers are specified in the user documentation or on the website for the router lift.

      Reply
  38. Ernest Weschcke

    I am from Lake Nebagamon, WI and I always enjoy you and your shows, also that is one beautiful dog. Thanks for the shows.

    Reply