WWGOA LIVE! December 2016

Winter has taken hold in the north, making it a great time to be in the shop. But when isn’t it great to be in the shop? Enjoy our December LIVE, and have a great holiday season.

0:20 Welcome to WWGOA LIVE
0:35 The guitar George is making
3:15 Air drying vs kiln drying. Advantages/disadvantages
6:15 Top coating over Mylands Friction Polish
8:10 Perfect 45 degree cuts on the table saw
16:13 Forcing boards straight in a glue up
17:10 Router lift in a router table
21:18 Drywall screws vs wood screws
27:23 Christmas joke
28:40 Flattening boards on a planer
31:41 Using up wood scraps
33:50 Polyurethane and construction adhesive as outdoor glues
36:55 Router bit coming loose?
39:10 Jointing; getting a wedge shape
44:32 Dadoes on a shared wall
47:45 Stave construction
49:36 Tear out on routing
51:22 Lathe buying advice
53:45 Spar varnish, lacquer over shellac?
55:28 Two-part epoxy finish
56:45 Tear out on finger joints
57:40 Making secret compartments
58:56 Dust collection pipe sizes
1:00:02 George’s holiday greeting


Discussion
  • (will not be published)

151 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! December 2016”
  1. jon

    i have 2 question

    1: would you every recommend doing “skip plane”

    2: when doing face to face glue up, can you force a board to be straight by putting 2 straight pieces in front and back of the damage board

    Reply
    • Sam Kirchoff

      Like you just did! Submit your question in the same comment box you used to ask that question and we’ll do our best to answer as many as we can during the live broadcast!

      Reply
  2. 1withthegrain

    Does a card scraper give the same finish as a plane? If so any tips on buying and using a card scraper?

    Reply
  3. Lloyd Fitchett

    I have a question. After waiting about 5 years, I finally purchased a router and router table and a router lift. I thought the purpose of the lift was to raise the Colette above the table for easy bit change. I bought the setup from Kreg. The lift does not raise the bit high enough to be above the table. When I called Kreg about this, they suggested I use offset wrenches to change the bit. Is this the only solution? Am I wrong in thinking that the collette should rise above the table? Did I choose the wrong company when I bought the lift? Does any lift bring the parts high enough that I do not need an offset wrench?

    Reply
    • Michael

      I’m using a jessem router lift on the Kreg table and the collet raises completely above the table. George`s tip is sound too, the router motor may not be set high in the lift.

      Reply
  4. Chuck

    I used your 4 part bowl turning video along with Mylands friction Polish. After the Polish dries would it be ok to top coat with a 50/50
    Blend of Zinsser Seal coat and denatured alcohol to increase the luster or another product. Thanks

    Reply
  5. Chris

    My question is, I’ve viewed the video about dumping dry wall screws for woodworking, and only using wood screws that have a shank, does this apply for any wood material such as plywood / MDF etc. Steel and copper colour screws also come with screw threads all the way up the body, like a dry wall screw, where should they be used? Finally, when attaching 2 pieces of wood or plywood, do you also need to use glue or will just screwing be sufficient even if you do not intend to take them apart again? Thanks Chris.

    Reply
  6. Tom K

    Question: How to get perfect 45 degree cuts on a table saw – I’ve just multiple jigs, including a 45 degree drafting triangle and they always seem to come out just a little bit off – requiring recutting

    Reply
  7. Phil Cusimano

    Hi George,
    Stoked .. I’m using 6/4 Maple boards with 1 straight edge. The boards are roughly 6 feet long and 6 inches wide. I used a straight on three of the 6 boards which appear to perfectly straight only one board as a bowed side. My questions is this, I don’t think my joiner will handle the width of these boards. Should I just skip straight to my thickness planer? and just get them down to 4/4? This is the first time I’m using rough furniture grade lumber. Previously I used what they call 3/4 inch S4 furniture grade hobby boards and sheet goods. What’s your advise. Thanks Phil

    Reply
  8. karl

    I’m currently in planning stages of a custom headboard. My plan is to have two (2) columns 16 x 16 x 60 apart, one each side. With shelves 16” O/C With a 46” span between columns. Atop the columns will be a (mantel like piece) 4.5 x 20. X 90” Under this mantel will be a case 3.750 x 12 x 45.875 with an open top. Looking for stainable material, trying to stay from .781 finished plywood.
    Inside this case I will have two (2) actuator(s) (one each end) with a magnetic release. This under-case will hold a hunting rifle & two hand pistols, inside there’s foam to hold fire arms in place.

    This under case will drop down 30’ hinged @ the back rail of 3.750 x 45.875 bottom W/ a piano hinge. LQQKING for information how to mount this back rail to the mantel with-out wood screws. Thinking polyurethane adhesive (Gorllia glue) Would this be strong enough to hold the weight?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t use polyurethane glue too much, but use yellow glue all the time. When the joinery is sound, a glue joint can be stronger than the surrounding wood. If you can create a good joint, yellow glue should do a suitable job of holding the pieces together.

      Reply
  9. Charles Nardina

    I used your 4 part bowl turning video and Mylands friction Polish. Can I topcoat with boiled linseed oil then a coat of Zinsser Seal coat thinned 1: 1 with denatured alcohol or is there anything else I could use as a topcoat.

    Reply
  10. Dennis

    What am I doing wrong when my router bit shaves a small amount from the inside of the bushing

    Reply
    • Hank Mayberry

      When tightening a router bit in a collet also be sure the shank of the router bit is not bottomed out completely. You should always raise the bit slightly before tightening. If you don’t do this the drawing down action of the collet and nut will prevent the bit from completely tightening in the router and it could come out.

      Reply
  11. gnuckols

    For an outdoor project that will be exposed to the elements (rain, snow), does polyurethane glue or construction adhesive have any advantage over waterproof PVA glue like Titebond III?

    Reply
  12. Todd Coburn

    Thanks for taking time each month to host this helpful event!

    Here’s my question: What do you do with all the left-over small pieces of scrap after making the cuts you need for the project? I keep them thinking I might need them for some other project, but it just keeps piling up.

    Reply
  13. Rick

    I had some butcher-block countertop left over from a rental property I remodeled. So
    I cut it up too make 4 end grain cutting boards out of it. The first one I did I realized I didn’t do enough sanding on it and could see some of the striping from the router bit l’ve already applied mineral oil to it is there anything I can do or just live with it? The last one I did has a void in it from a knot after routing I dropped a small little gym stone into the void and then was going to fill it with epoxy do you have any suggestions?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      If you’ve got machining marks, under the finish, there’s really no choice but to sand the finish off and sand the marks out. I like the idea of insert a gem stone into the void. Could be a very cool personalization of the cutting board.

      Reply
  14. Greg

    Greg Upstate IN
    What would be a good set of high quality chisles? My Stanleys will not get the job done.

    Reply
    • James

      I have vintage chisels that were hand-me-downs that cut as well as my absurdly expensive Lie-Neilsen chisels. The key is proper sharpening. If yours have been hack on a bit, it would be a good idea to take them to a saw sharpening pro and have a perfect and true base grind restored so you can then maintain a good hone going forward. George has a nice video on sharpening.

      Reply
  15. Wayne Mills

    I often get wedging in wood taken over my jointer. It’s slight but present. I try to use sharp knives and that seems to help. I’ve made the infeed and outfield tables as co-planar as I can. Any suggestions/reasons for the problem? Thanks. I enjoy your videos.

    Reply
  16. Rick Olsen

    I did a 2 part epoxy pour on a serving tray and not happy with the result. It has cured now for 72 hrs so can I do an addition pour over the top?

    Reply
  17. Michael

    Is it a good idea to run Dadoes on opposing sides of a vertical divider such as in a wide bookcase? Seems to me it would weaken the structure.

    Reply
    • James

      I do it all the time on the center panel making the opposing dados 1/4″ deep leaving 1/4″ of material between. Once glued up and set these seem to be strong points in the build rather than weak. Never had one fail.

      Reply
  18. angelmarkjames

    I must build a hexagonal spire for a project. The spire is about 12 inches high, 2 inches on each side at the bottom and 1/2 inch on each side at the top. This will require a compound angle cut but I have not been able to set it up properly on the table saw. Any suggestions?

    Reply
  19. Dustin Fournier

    When installing euro hinges on doors. How do I line up the inside piece on the cabinet.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      The set back from the front of the cabinet is usually 32 mm to the center of the anchor holes. If you can put the hinges in the door, put on the mounting brackets, and then hold the door in place, you can mark out the location of the mounting brackets directly from the screw holes in the mounting brackets.

      Reply
  20. guy

    It’s my birthday… My question is what kinds of finish can be covered and repaired with french polish and how do you tell them apart. Thanks!

    Reply
  21. James

    I recently purchased a butterfly template for making those cool ties to help hold splits and checks together in large live edge tabletops. Mostly because I love the look of a perfectly fitted “patch”. Can you, or do you, have a video demo for actually using one of these templates properly for cutting the butterfly hole AND the butterfly patch? Or am I on my own to figure it out?

    Reply
  22. Joseph Zawodny

    George, I have an extension on my table saw for my router. I was cutting a hand-hold groove on the underside of a cutting board. The cove bit worked just fine on three sides. However, on the fourth side as I slid the cutting board along I had a tear-out occur. I will have to cut in a dutchman to replace the tearout. What did I do wrong and how can I avoid this in the future.

    Reply
    • Joseph Zawodny

      Thank you for your answer to my question. I make end-grain cutting boards as designed by a Russian woodworker. His website is MTM Wood. I forgot to state that I used a frame around the perimeter of the cutting board. The frame is made of Jatoba. This is where I had the tear out. I only screwed the frame onto the board and I was going to epoxy it after I had the hand holds routed into it. It was the long grain piece where the tear out occurred. I am located in Cutler Bay, Florida. I am about 25 miles south of Miami. Not a good place to do woodwork in the summer. Brutal!!!!

      Reply
      • George Vondriska

        Jatoba is a beautiful wood, but can chip pretty easily. Sounds like a good backer board for the cuts might be the answer.

        Reply
  23. Greg

    Greg
    Am considering a sliding table saw. If it will take a dado set would their be any disatvantage other than cost?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Sliding table saws are great. They can have a large footprint. If you’ve got the space, I don’t see any disadvantages.

      Reply
  24. marc

    Thank you George and crew for the live videos and all the great information. Wood worker for 4 years and still learning new technique’s everyday.Merry Christmas and a happy safe new year.

    Reply
  25. jorjsal

    I glue up what could be viewed as a mini cutting board, then I stack then and glue the stacks until I have a 3.5 by 3.5 block, 5 to 7 inches long. I then cut on band saw to 1/2 inch thick, sand and and give away as end grain coasters.

    Reply
  26. Peter

    Just finished buildinging a boat book shelf and finished with shellac but would like to know if I should put spar varnish or Polyurethane or lacquer as a top coat.

    Reply
  27. Eddie Antley

    when changing a band saw blade ,should it be in the middle of the wheel or as some say the teeth of the blade should be in the middle of the wheel , just your thoughts , love the show and thanks for sharing the knowledge

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      On narrow blades I put the teeth of the blade on the center of the tire. On wider blade I center the blade on the crown of the tire. Never let any part of the blade project off the back of the wheel.

      Reply
  28. Karen

    I’m new to woodturning, when do you use a forstner bit vs. a brad point drill bit. Listening from home in Northern VT

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Small forstner bits, under 1/2″, have a hard time clearing the chips. As a general rule I’ll use brad point bits up to 1/2″, and then switch to forstners.

      Reply
  29. Anil

    I am from Mumbai (India). Do you ship your products/CDs to India. I am very much interested in some of your products. Pls advice

    Reply
  30. Jim Bradley

    Using cherry plywood with solid cherry edging. How do I get uniform staining. Plywood often darker.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      You may have to pre treat the plywood so it doesn’t get as dark. Dewaxed shellac can be used for this. Experiment with putting a coat of shellac on the plywood, lightly sanding, and then staining everything. The shellac will prevent the stain from soaking in as much, and darkening, the plywood.

      Reply
  31. Alistair

    Hi George ,

    Alistair here from Australia,I have been watching u a lot ,just became a member. Just a quick question im building a router table. i have to sanwich 2 sheets of form ply and the second sheet will be plywood whats the best way to do this both are half inch in thickness.

    Thanks

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Sorry, but I’m not sure I understand the question. If you’re concerned about keeping the assembly flat, I’d lay it on a dead flat surface, like a table saw, and weight the glue up from the top. Be sure to cover your saw table with wax paper, or similar, to protect it from glue.

      Reply
  32. Robert

    Watching from Los Alamos, NM. Thanks for the great info, I’ve got to make sure I’m available for the next live show!

    Reply
  33. Bob Jansen

    I made a bar with a hickory slab top this past summer. After it was finished small bugs, likely termites, started appearing out of a hole. How could I prevent that with future projects with the remaining slabs?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Wow, that sounds like a bad set of house guests. You might want to make a call to an insect specialist to see if the wood can be treated to make sure there aren’t any remaining.

      Reply
  34. Trevor

    Humidity and Temp…..I have a 26 x 36, 3 car garage with 10 foot ceilings. Insulated and heated with a nat gas forced air furnace (for now). This summer the humidity was 75%, Now the humidity is 40-50%, I keep the garage at 47F overnight and while I’m at work, then warm it up to 61ishF. (beyond the obvious danger of this furnace, we are vigilant about dust control to ensure no fires!) Is the temp change adversely affecting the wood stock?
    In the summer when I had a 15 stack of 3/4″ Birch Ply, as I was processing it, if I left the top sheet overnight it would be warped, the ply was from a brand new wrapped lift from Rona (the cheap imported stuff) I was able to correct that issue by processing the plywood as fast as possible and then stacking pieces with spacers. I’m thinking the high humidity then was the problem.
    Now that it’s winter and drier my concern is the affects on the larger left over pieces of ply and my 4/4 Birch, 4/4 black walnut, 4/4 zepele, 8/4 Beach planks. Do you have some info or recommendations for me, or is it just the nature of home shop woodworking? Thanks, Trev.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Trevor. The changes in humidity and temperature won’t necessarily have an adverse effect on your stock, but I would keep the stock stickered in storage just as an added insurance. I keep most of my hardwood up in an unheated attic storage room, and it will see temperature swings of 100 degrees in a typical year, and probably similar humidity swings to what you are describing. I keep it stickered and stacked, and pull it into the shop a week or so before I use it and I rarely have problems with my stock. I would suggest a similar approach for you.
      The humidity changes are more likely to affect plywood. If you can store it in a stack with some weight on it, that will help your cause a lot compared to storing it leaning against the wall. But as you found, it will still be effected. I notice that my cheaper plywood is more effected by this than the more expensive cabinet grade stuff, and for the most part I just let it happen and deal with it. I don’t store much plywood, as I normally buy what I need for a large project, and keep the leftovers on hand for smaller projects.

      Reply
  35. Gary Mesojedec

    Newbury, Ohio- Good show, George. Thanks for your generous sharing of your knowledge.

    Reply
  36. Clarence

    I am very interested in fabricating wood framed tools that can also be used to shape and work automotive sheet steel.

    Reply
  37. Jim Rockwell

    I’m making a coffee table out of hard maple, what do you recommend for a stain, I’ve heard it can be a difficult wood to stain, I was thinking of just a sealer and Danish oil natural.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Jim. If you want to tone the wood, I would suggest using transtint dyes which are available at woodworking specialty stores. These do a good job of darkening lights woods such as maple. I’ve had a lot of problems trying to apply dark colors to maple using pigment based stains, so if you are planning to go dark, I would avoid pigment based stains.
      If you don’t intend to color it, then I’d suggest using a wipe-in poly, and my favorite in that category is Minwax. Easy application and consistently good results. Danish oil is beautiful as well, but offers only minimal protection. If you use this, I would wait a week or so after application, and cover it with a couple coats of poly for added moisture protection.

      Reply
  38. Chris

    George, viewing from just south of London in the UK, on Friday. Thanks for answering my question on screws, in the show, good reply.

    A couple of comments about your points and observations concerning waste wood, from the show. My rule is anything less than 12 inches, its thrown out. Wood between say 12 inches and 24 inches, i make into stirrers for paint, varnish and for spreading glue.

    Man made wood, like MDF/Plywood should NOT be burn’t in a domestic fire as they give off harmful fumes when burn’t. I realise from the show you indicated you could burn some quantities of waste wood in the winter for heating.

    Reply
  39. Phil

    When answering Dennis at 36:55 when you talked about router bits moving in the collet.
    I have had brand new bits slip because I failed to clean off the coating of grease or whatever they used to prevent corrosion on the bit. Denatured alcohol works well for this.

    Reply
  40. Vernon Stedronsky

    Watching the show on computer, I cannot hear the questions. Would it be possible to print the questions on screen as the lady is reading them? I enjoy the presentations.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Vernon. We would like to let you know that your suggestion has been forwarded to the proper department. Your comments are important to us and help with the development of our online video streaming community.

      Reply