WWGOA LIVE! August 2016



It was great to have Jim Heavey on board for our LIVE event, but he ran into some tech issues on his end. We’ll get him back in the future. Thanks to all who tuned in. See you next month.

1:23 Jim Heavey introduction
2:16 What horsepower for large router bits?
3:52 Router bit stuck
5:13 Joining end grain to long grain
7:50 Basement shop advice
11:00 Impact drivers
12:40 Lathe chisels for turning cork
14:43 Water stones vs slow speed grinders vs wet wheels
16:50 Sanding a disc on the lathe
19:29 Kayleen McCabe videos for kids
20:25 Warped doors
23:15 Saw upgrade. SawStop?
25:00 Brands of CNC machines
28:25 Jointer knife alignment
31:58 Blades for compound slide miter saws
35:11 Getting good miters
38:59 Benchtop jointers?
40:52 DeWalt 734 or 735?
42:40 Bosch REAXX saw
44:30 WorkSharp 3000
45:45 Why sanding sealer?
49:16 Straighten a lathe tool rest
52:38 Carbide vs steel lathe chisels
54:40 Sharpening kitchen knives on a slow speed grinder
57:25 Planer snipe

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Discussion
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166 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! August 2016”
      • Jim Heavey

        Jerry, most applications require a router with at least 2HP. There are bigger routers for sure, but those 3 1/2 HP routers would be more appropriate for a commercial shop. I have had a 2 1/4 HP router in my table all but forever and it works fine. As with any tool, multiple passes maybe necessary.

        Reply
    • Customer Service

      You could do many things with this. You might consider bringing it to a shop to make veneer out of it for you. Or if you are into turning, you could make some great bowl blanks from a slab like this.

      Reply
  1. Vernon Stewart

    Have you tried the new Shaper Origen handheld CNC machine and if so what are your first impressions?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Vernon. I’m hoping to get my hands on one in the not too distant future. When I do, I’ll be writing it up for WWGOA.

      Reply
  2. Gary Lueking

    Seems last few live events have been on Wed evening, is there any way some could be on Tue so as not to conflict with church services?

    Reply
    • Antony Stenta

      Gary why not consider changing the day you go to church services so as to not miss out on the live show?

      Reply
  3. PAUL

    I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW HOW TO CARVE A RAISED DECORATION/PATTERN INTO A BLOCK OF WOOD LIKE CHERRY OR MAHOGANY.

    Reply
  4. Glenn E. Bindley

    When building the Langstroth Bee Hive I have tried to use the dovetail bit. but nothing matches. When I do the Box joint using the 1/2 ” straight bit, everything joins just fine. What am I doing wrong on the Dovetail ?

    Reply
  5. wade church

    I was trying to get a bit out of a router I took it from the bottom and turned it to many times and it came from the bottom did I mess it up

    Reply
  6. Leon Michon

    I have to join a 1 inch thick by 3 inch wide board end grain to a 1 inch thk board with long grain. What is the strongest joint? glue and two 1/2 dowels or use a biscuit and glue to make the joint. The placement of the joint is critical and using dowels might get tricky but I’m guessing it is stronger than a biscuit. The biscuit is more forgiving to the location of the joint and will be easier to make than having to align a dowel jig on both parts. Which method is stronger and by how much?

    Reply
  7. Dan Holden

    How can I check, maybe on the site, to see if I’m getting the newsletter, et al? It seems all I get from you is ads.

    Reply
  8. Vishwanath

    Interested in carpentry. Please let me have following

    1. Fundamentals of Carpentry
    2. Basic tools to start with
    3. Different types of joints for different type of furniture or articles.

    Reply
  9. ed

    how to effectively use modpog and can you still lacquer over it. using stain and finish after.

    Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      I’ve never used this product so I won’t just venture an answer. I do admit, though, that whenever I try something new, I always make up a sample board of the same project species and test everything on that. Whatever happens there will surely be the same on the actual project. Hope that helps, Ed.

      Reply
  10. Chris

    This is Chris from London, UK. My question is, if you have any sheet material with all 4 sides not square or parallel with each other, how do you make it into an exact square with all 4 sides straight and parallel, when you can’t use the bench saw fence?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      You can square the sheet by cutting it with a circ saw or hand held router, using a straight edge to guide the cut.

      Reply
  11. Chris

    This is Chris from London, UK. Why do I need to go out and buy an impact driver when driving screws into my work when I can set my normal drill onto the hammer setting? Is this not the same thing?

    Reply
  12. Jim smith

    Hi guys, great to see Jim Heavey with you. I am moving my shop to an unfinished basement. I am going finish the basement and put in 20 ft by 24 ft shop. What are some resources help with the layout, lighting, flooring, etc. I am also thinking about putting my dust collector in a separate room with a exhaust fan to the outside to keep dust to a minimal. Your your opinion? Thanks guys

    Reply
    • Jason

      Hi Jim,
      That’s really great you want to create a shop in your basement. I’ve recently done this myself. It was a big project, but I’m happy with the results. I would recommend you start with your tools…etc…to accommodate the space. I started with my workbench and table saw and expanded the layout from there. Don’t skimp on lighting or electrical i.e. 220V, one day you’ll need 220V and you’ll be glad you have it. Having a dust collector in a separate room is a good idea as well helps with noise reduction.

      Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Ron. If you have any questions or concerns regarding your account, please contact us at 1-855-253-0822.

      Reply
  13. Russ Philstrom

    What would you recommend for lathe chisels for turning wood and cork handles on my Delta lathe. I build custom fishing rods in my business so most of my work is similar to smaller spindles with special shapes or curves. I do not own a slow speed grinder as you recommend for sharpening. Thanks.

    Reply
  14. Frank Jenkins

    I am interested in sharpening plane irons and chisels. There is a lot of confusing information on which method is best. Possibilities include water stones, slow speed grinder, Workshop 300, Tormek, Rikon Wet system, etc. I just need the tools reasonably sharp with minimum fuss. I would also like to purchase one solution and become good using it rather than chasing the next best solution. What is your recommendation please?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      You’re right, there are lots of choices. Part of the answer will come down to budget. I don’t own a Tormek-type system, so really can’t provide an evaluation of it. However I have been using the WorkSharp for quite a while, and like it. I think it provides the versatility to sharpen many different objects. I primarily use it for bench chisels and lathe chisels.

      Reply
  15. jon

    do you think a nail gun is a must have tool or just something that comes in handy when you need it?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I use a brad nailer and pneumatic stapler in my shop all the time. I think an 18 ga nailer is a must have item.

      Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      It depends on the application, Jon. I have found my pin nailer to be indispensable. It creates such a small hole but grips well. Brad nailers and trim nailers each have their place but I’ve found that the pin nailer suits all my woodworking needs. If you plan on doing a lot of trim work or framing, those other nailers work well. .

      Reply
  16. PAUL

    WHICH IS BETTER A HAND HELD CHISEL OR ELECTRIC POWER CHISEL FOR CARVING & HOW DO YOU USE THEM ON PROJECTS?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Lots of it depends. Some people start their work with power carving, and finish it with hand work. Others do all their work with hand tools, other with power tools. It would be a good idea to take a carving class and see which tool set feels best to you.

      Reply
  17. karl

    Karl, North-East of denver. While rough sanding W/ 320 grit. the circumference of 3/4×10 Poplar bottom disk, (Lazy Susan) While in my lathe monuted on a face plate, i am smooth on outer edges 360′ but there are 3″ in center 360′ apart looks like chatter marks. No chatter visable 360′ Is this caused by chisels or caused by? End Result, Lazy Susan.

    Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      Karl, I think I understand the question. If the disk is not flat across its face, then sandpaper on any type of block has a tendency to just span the concave area, especially near the center. Place a straight edge across the disk from edge to edge and you’ll be able to tell what you may have to flatten with a skew chisel. Once the total face has been flattened, then proceed with sanding.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      If the joints are good you can use yellow glue. If there are large gaps in the joints you may have to use epoxy.

      Reply
  18. Bruce

    I’d like to use some old T&G wainscoting to make panels for a tool cabinet. Is it OK to glue them together or should I modify my plans to attach individual pieces?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      As you put things together you’ll need to allow the wainscoting to expand and contract. As long as you keep that in mind in your design, you should be ok. I’ve built melamine cabinet and fastened wainscoting to the exterior using 100% silicone caulk as the adhesive. My feeling was that the silicone would bond it to the substrate, but allow it to move as needed.

      Reply
  19. Robert

    Why do my doors always turn out warped? I assemble and glue on a torsion box. Barn doors, gates, frame and panel, they’re always warped.

    Reply
  20. Larry

    What do you think of pocket screws instead of mortise and tenon for a cabinet face frame?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I use pocket screws for face frames all the time. I’ve never used mortise and tenon on a face frame, and have built lots and lots of cabinets.

      Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      Both methods will joint those rails and stiles well. Pocket screws are certainly faster. M & T are more traditional. My personal choice to not to use pocket screws if there is any chance they’ll be visible, say on a cabinet with a mirrored back or open glass sides. Hope that helps, Larry.

      Reply
  21. Richard

    I have a small garage shop. I a Ridged contractor table saw and want to upgrade. I have looked at the Sawstop and Powermatic, however, not sure of the pros and cons of a 1.75hp and the 3hp. Leaning toward the Sawstop

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I have a 3 hp machine. It’s not imperative to have the extra horsepower, but it’s sure nice when I’m ripping thick stock.

      Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      The old adage is the more teeth the better especially since all the cuts are across the grain. If you’re talking about brand, there are many to choose from. I’ve found price is a good indication of quality. This is not the place for a cheap blade. Miters cuts should be crisp and clean and less expensive blades generally don’t provide that quality. You’ll be very happy with blades by Forrest, Ridge Carbide, Freud among other top quality manufacturers, Howard.

      Reply
  22. Donald

    I have been working with wood for 40 years and have done many projects from
    grandfather clocks to toys for the grandkids. What brand of CNC machine would you recommend for the next phase of my wood working.

    Reply
  23. Steve

    Question for Jim H. What brand of finish & stain do you find applies well with HVLP?

    Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      I have had really good results with nearly every finish I’ve used, Steve. The key is adjusting the gun or finish to fully atomize it. I’m a fan of lacquer and had very good results with Watco. As far as stains, I do like the Varathane line. Again, I’ve shot most finishes, regardless of manufacturer, with success.

      Reply
  24. engine

    For Jon: I can’t drive a nail straight or without bending it. A nail gun and stapler is a must.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Answered at 57:25. On any planer be sure you check the infeed and outfeed rollers to make sure they’re level with the main table.

      Reply
  25. Rob Edwards

    Can a slow speed grinder be used to sharpen kitchen knives? If so, do you know a jig for it?

    Reply
  26. Russell

    Thanks for addressing my question. Most of my work on the cork is done with sandpaper. What would you recommend about carbide choices for the wood handles I make. Cost is a concern.
    Russ in Emily, Minnesota

    Reply
  27. Chris

    I have limited space in my workshop. How effective are bench top jointers for those with space constraints.

    Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      Chris, I had a bench top jointer years ago and though it worked well with short pieces of stock, I just couldn’t joint anything of any real length. The infeed and outfeed tables are just oo short and they can’t be extended in any way I know of. Remember, you can joint on a table saw by attaching your unjointed board to a straight carrier board that rides the fence to create a jointed edge. You can search that technique on many woodworking sites.
      Secondly, I found these bench top units were really loud!

      Reply
  28. Larry Neidig Jr

    Where would you get a list for the speed of router bits that they operate at?
    Larry PA

    Reply
  29. George from NC

    How do i align my delta jointer knives with the jointer bed ? is there a homemade jig i can maker to align them?

    Reply
  30. Zara King

    Why do I have a problem getting 45 degree angles to match up when making picture frames. I have tried on both my miter saws with the same end results!

    Reply
  31. ericlsmith@outlook.com

    Hey Jim, loved your article “Just Shut-Up”. I had just finished a craftsman clock for a gift, and I did just that! Eric in Dalton Ga.

    Reply
  32. dennerd

    For Dust Collection do you recommend a ducted whole shop system or shop vacs dedicated to individual machines. I have seen vacs built into the shop built machine stands to enclose them and reduce noise. Any pros or cons on this? Dennis in Elizabethtown KY

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I like having an entire shop piped for dust collection, but that can be a big investment. Remember that dust collectors move A LOT more air than shop vacuums, so work a lot better on table saws and planers, which have higher CFM requirements.

      Reply
  33. Chuck Faith

    Hi George, this is chuck Faith from Pennsylvania, what is the real purpose for sanding sealer.

    Reply
  34. Rob Edwards

    What is either George’s or jims opinion on the new Bosch breaking table saw vs sawstop?

    Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      George will have a video on this soon. My thoughts are that both those tools have great merit. One of the biggest differences is the capacity and, of course, the pricing. Bosch’s saw is more portable which may be a consideration if it’s used on the job.

      Reply
  35. Duffy

    I just received a Work Sharp 3000 for my birthday (8/28). What do I need to know about it, before I use it.

    Reply
  36. Richard

    you sent out a special announcement advertising Snap-Check multipurpose digital gauge. What is your opinion of its accuracy and what other gauges are in the market for setup of table saw jointers, router and other that you would recommend

    Reply
  37. James Blackwell @ Edmonton, Alberta

    I have been thinking of getting a planer and have determined that it would be either the Dewalt 734 or 735. I see that you have the 734 – are you happy with it.

    Reply
  38. Nevin

    I watched your video on table saw techniques and you showed how to cut tenons with your jig. I thought your jig was pretty nice but I can not find a plan for it under jigs. I can probably make something but still interested in your plan, if you can share. Thanks!!

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      We’ve done a couple different tenon jigs, but I think the one you’re talking about is the one that looks kind of like a chair. If so, the idea was that the walk through we provided in the video would get you through the building process.

      Reply
  39. Mark Pugh

    The purpose of using sanding sealer is that it has additives (calcium?) that make it easier to sand without clogging up your sandpaper. This friendly tip comes from George’s college roommate, Mark.

    Reply
  40. Peter Isdale, Australia

    Is there a safe way to use protective gloves around rotating machinery? Or is an absolute No-no?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t think it’s ever a good idea to have gloves on around rotating machines.

      Reply
  41. Craig

    I have a new rabbet plane and need to tune it; the base and side is slightly out of square appx the thickness of business card with the top of the side kicked in. How critical is it to get a perfect 90 degree?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m not a huge hand tool guy, but I would think have the base and side perpendicular is very critical.

      Reply
  42. Eddie Daniel

    First time to catch the show. I am hooked and also a member. South West Arkansas.

    Reply
  43. Robert

    In making my first end grain cutting board(maple/Purple Heart) After initial glue up I skimmed the end grain edges with you table saw,and wound up with both being slightly out of square,since I want to cut and expose the end grain,what is the best technique to square an end,when both ends are out of square? Bob. Florida

    Reply
  44. John

    I was not aware of your “Gold” membership. How does it differ from “premium”. Form Tampa Florida.

    Reply
  45. Greg d'Arbonne

    You’ll enjoy the skydiving experience. Spent a lot of my life jumping out of airplanes. 🙂

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I haven’t done distressed wood projects. As a finish, I’ve been using AquaCoat top coats.

      Reply
  46. engine

    snipe: I found setting the infeed and outfeed tables .010 higher than the planer bed

    Reply
  47. Richard

    thank you for your recommendation on the brand sawstop, however, what about the HP 1.75 or 3hp

    Reply
  48. Jim

    I took an old oak interior panel door apart circa1930, the panels were veneered with some type of core, not plywood, do you have any idea what the core material is?

    Reply
    • Jim Heavey

      Yes, it can, Tim. The issue is allowing it to dry completely before putting on that top coat. All finishes cure in relation to temperature and humidity. In cool and humid times, allow a lot more drying time. When I use BLO or any penetrating oil finish, I usually triple the can recommendations for dry time. After all, what’s the hurry? And, TEST, TEST, TEST on a piece of scrap of the same species to be sure.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      This isn’t something I’ve ever done, so I’m not certain. You could try calling the manufacturer of the poly to ask them about compatibility.

      Reply
  49. Clay Bearden

    My first time watching. This was great! Lots of useful info. I’ll definitely watch again. I was in one of your WWW classes back in May. I’m from Tennessee.

    Reply
  50. Ernie

    From Pennsylvania… No questions at the moment, but more of a comment or two. For one, the audio was between 0.25 to 0.5 seconds behind the video.. More of a suggestion, George could really use a wireless mic… The echo when in the ‘main shop’ section, it rather annoying. The audio signal when in the smaller ‘wing’ shop, is much better. With such an operation, I think investing in a wireless microphone is a well worthwhile thing to look into…

    Love the live feeds and will look forward to more of them in the future. Thanks for all you do.

    Reply
    • Michael

      Ernie…I guarantee you, the out of sync audio/video is on your end, you may want to upgrade your video card.

      Reply
  51. gerry

    Thanks for an interesting presentation I know the . Sorry Jim got lost, but that’s the way it goes sometimes. I know the echo is from hard shop walls but can something be done to tame it down a bit?
    GerryB, Oregon coast

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      We keep trying to make things better on these videos. I know the audio is dicey, and we’re trying to make it better.

      Reply
  52. Edward

    I’m making tools now and needed a good band saw to cut and re-saw. I had one I bought that was awful and sent to it back to the store, I won’t say the name. I then looked at the Wen and bought one, the first one was damaged in shipment and sent it back. I received another one that is great, except the re-saw. I have a problem with blade drift when I use the fence! I can free hand just fine but when I use the fence it has a bad blade drift. I don’t seem to get any information of how to set adjust the saw to prevent this. I love the saw and it’s a great buy for the quality and 6″ re-saw.
    thank you Ed

    Reply
  53. Edward

    I hear about the problems people are having with planers? I have a Ry bio, that I have had for about 7 years and I don’t have the problems with snipe or other problems. Is there something wrong with the planer or am I doing things wrong, I don’t have a problem with it so I will never be able to fix it.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi, Edward. As the saying goes, if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. Not all planers exhibit this problem so consider yourself lucky to be in the fortunate category.

      Reply
  54. Edward

    I make small toys and such. I use modpog for the color items. My question is the finish to use over water based stains, dye’s etc. Is it lacquer or varnish, or other.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Edward. Check the labels and web sites of your finishing products for compatibility, but in general, you can apply most any topcoat product over a water based stain once the stain is completely dry.

      Reply