WWGOA LIVE! April 2016

We had a guest for this session: Joni Van Dusartz. Joni has been woodworking for over 20 years, including running a commercial cabinet shop. From CNC to finishing, Joni has a lot of woodworking experience. She brought along some of her intarsia for “show and tell,” which lead to some great questions.

:24 Intro of Joni and her intarsia
3:16 George’s jigs
4:08 Bandsaw resawing/carbide blades? More on resawing
5:26 Benchtop planers/importance of variable speed
6:40 Z zeroing problems on a benchtop CNC
8:12 Pitch on table saw blades
9:18 Step by step for kitchen cabinets General info on cabinetmaking Kitchen Cabinets DVDs
10:56 Joni’s tips on staining wood
12:26 Coiling a bandsaw blade Video on coiling Bruce Kieffer’s coiling technique
16:06 Bat house How to Build a Bat House
15:50 Removing paint from wood
17:05 Prevent chipping when drilling with a forstner
18:26 Joni’s go-to blade for scroll saw work More help on choosing the right scroll saw blade
20:00 Staining wood through and through
21:20 Setting up a mortiser More mortiser info Setting the auger General set up Correct cutting technique
27:17 Intarsia patterns
27:58 Intarsia for beginners
29:13 Drawing your own intarsia patterns
29:51 Scroll saw or bandsaw for intarsia?
31:26 Sequence of intarsia cuts
31:56 Lathe chisel selection Choosing a Starter Set of Lathe Chisels Carbide lathe chisel in action
35:40 Sharpening Check out the variety of sharpening techniques on WWGOA.com
37:20 Fastening intarsia patterns to the material Joni’s video on fastening patterns
38:39 Horizontal vs vertical panel raisers Choosing a panel raiser
40:30 Cutting a straight line on a scroll saw
42:18 Preventing expansion and contraction in solid wood
43:25 Starting out with SketchUp Check out the WWGOA SketchUp Class
45:12 Woodburning or staining intarsia pieces
46:35 SawStop brakes Watch our video on how to change a SawStop brake
48:13 Dust free finishing Here’s a tip on keeping your finish dust free
50:06 How long did Joni’s wolf take to make?
50:38 Protecting tools from rust
52:30 Tensioning scroll saw blades
54:52 CNC parts Here are some samples of what a CNC machine can do
56:40 Taper jig on the table saw Tapered cuts using a pattern Shop-made taper jig Using a commercial taper jig

Discussion
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110 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! April 2016”
  1. jim

    I am trying to refinish a dresser top that has 3 10 by 10 shelves, what is the best way to put on clear poly? I don’t have a hvlp sprayer.

    Reply
    • WWGOA Team

      The best way is the approach that works best for you. Normally the choices come down to brushes or rags. My preference is to use wipe-on poly, and use a clean cotton cloth to put on many thin coats. This approach is very easy, relatively quick and produces nice looking results. If you go with this approach, plan on applying more coats than if you brush on full strength poly. Normally I apply 5-6 coats, but they go on quicker and dry faster, so it doesn’t take much more time than 3 brushed on coats.

      Reply
  2. Danny

    How can I prevent tear out when using a fostner bit over 1inch. In 1/4 plywood. I have tried tape and a backer. I have around 35 holes that are about 1/2 inch apart. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Big B

      If the bit is not dull, don’t rush. Don’t use to much pressure. Let the bit do the work and make sure backer board is big enough so work piece is level.

      Reply
  3. John Harvey

    George is there any possibility of sending out your Dvd’s to Australia.They are great.I have a multi country Dvd’s player.Regards John Harvey.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      At this time we’re still not able to ship overseas. Hopefully that’ll change…..

      Reply
  4. Lewis Bussard

    Getting started in making furniture and starting simple. A new PM701 mortise machine just arrived today. Any hints on proper operation or issues to look out for? Did a couple test cuts, is the bottom always messy? How do you get the proper depth of cut for the tenon (say 1 inch)? My first project has 4 each 1/4″ mortises of two different lengths per leg, so figured a machine would save time.

    Reply
    • Ryan

      Are you using the square chisels? The bottom will tend to be messy. Do your best to clean it up with a sharp chisel. It reminds me that the hand tools will never become obsolete. Start with a piece of wood the same size as your joining bits, and mark the depth of the mortice required on one side. Set the fence so the chisel clears the front of the piece of timber and bring the chisel bit down to the height marked on the timber. Lock the depth gauge in at this depth. Reset the fence, then go with the cut on your timber, starting with both ends, then working on the material between them. As mentioned before, par out the bottom with a chisel, and if need be the sides and corners.

      Reply
  5. Al

    I have a oedimet over the front entrance. The cap is 8′ 2″ long. It is plywood needs t be replaced. No one carries 10′ sheets of plywood in my area. I can use solid wood like white oak or Cyprus, but how do I let the wood expand and contract so as not to crack a glue joint in the boards. I can’t access the cap from below so I can’t use z clips

    Reply
  6. Jeff Barber

    I am new to the turning world and have purchased the Harbor Freight Chisel set and as you know they dull very fast. What would you recommend for the starting wood turner when it comes to the best chisel/ set. Keeping in mind cost vs quality

    Reply
  7. Jim Heavey

    Can’t wait to see you at Weekend With WOOD, George. BTW, you’re one handsome guy!

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Aw, Jim. Thanks. Right back at ya’. I’m looking forward to May. Teaching at Weekend with Wood is going to be great.

      Reply
  8. Ken

    I am thinking of getting a spray gun, how do I evaluate the various products available. I will be using it mostly to finish turned projects such as bowls.

    Reply
    • Thomas

      If your are finishing turnings then you can use the lathe to do the finishing work. Just hold a rag with the finish against your turning like you did with the sandpaper to clean it up. You don’t need to buy a sprayer. You could also see if your finish comes in an aerosol can. If you do choose to get a sprayer as it is a good investment for finishing other projects it depends on the thickness/type of your finish and your budget. Another important criteria is ease of cleaning/disassembly and reassembly as most of the work required when using a sprayer is the clean-up because you have to take it apart and clean all the internal pieces before the finish dries or else the finish will gum it up and cause it to not work and/or break. I use a Wagner Flexio 850 HVLP which can handle thicker materials without thinning them first. It has 2 spray guns, a large one for paint/large area and a smaller one for detail finishes which might require thinning but probably only for paints and not liquid stain. (I’ve only used the larger paint gun.) Airless sprayers are more likely to require thinning. I would go with an airless or HVLP over a standard air sprayer as it has less over spray (meaning less wasted finish/getting finish where you don’t want it…all over your shop). There are videos here at WWGOA that compare the 3 kinds, Standard, Airless and HVLP. Using a sprayer also means using an organic vapor respirator especially if spraying indoors, and not just a dust mask. Airless sprayers use a pump to push the paint out directly and are self contained in a handheld unit. This makes them heavy and therefore hard to hold for long periods of time. That was one of my considerations between the Airless and the HVLP. An HVLP has a turbine or other means to generate the air but means the gun portion needs to be connected to the large turbine so you don’t get quite the portability of an airless so a consideration for an HVLP system is how long the hose is to the turbine. As far as the finish is concerned the end result is pretty much the same no matter which type or brand of sprayer you use.

      The most important considerations: Budget/Price, Ease of Cleanup, Amount of over spray, Finish capacity, and Weight.

      Reply
      • Thomas

        I forgot. You should use a paper towel and *NOT* a rag as a rag could get caught causing a safety hazard. A paper towel will just safely rip apart.

        Reply
  9. Bill

    I’m looking at purchasing a Dewalt DW734 Planner. Should I plan on purchasing Shelix Spiral Cutting Heads and is it worth it. They cost more than the planer itself.
    Thanks!

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I depends on what you’ll be cutting. A helical head will do a much better job on figured woods, with less tear out, which is a huge benefit. In general, it’ll provide a better cut quality than a straight knife head. But a straight knife, when sharp, does a reasonably good job in straight grained material.

      Reply
  10. Eric

    Is there something that I can do to keep pitch/resin from sticking onto my table saw blade? It seems that I have to clean it often lately!

    Reply
  11. Roger W. Wittenbrook

    What are good carbide lathe tools? So many choices in terms of size and length? I use Live Oak and it is hard to cut.

    Reply
  12. Jeff Rutkowski

    Is denatured alcohol a good alternative to using Pentacryl for use in stabilizing / drying cross cut sections of logs ? ( tree cookies ) I am trying to eliminate cracking but also would like to use something that would support a finish.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’ve used Pentacryl a bunch of times, but never tried stabilizing with denatured alcohol, so I don’t know if it’s a good substitute. Regarding finishing, according to the Pentracryl website “Once the wood is dry, any type of finish and glue can be used on the wood. Pentacryl™ will not discolor the wood, is non-hygroscopic and will not oxidize, decompose or migrate in the wood when exposed to different degrees of temperature and relative humidity. To determine how much Pentacryl is needed for your project, use our Wood Calculator.” http://www.preservation-solutions.com/product/pentacryl/

      Reply
  13. aaron

    Trying to figure out how to inlay gold or silver seamlessly into a bentwood ring… Any suggestions?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Wow. Sounds cool, but neither Joni nor I have any experience with this.

      Reply
    • Aaron

      Try a fine wire brush attachmemt for your drill for the cleaning. If you don’t mind the sheen, I found shellac works great for sealing after.

      Reply
    • Mark

      I made a bar top from barn wood planks. I done everything possible to avoid warping sometimes there isn’t anything you can do. Use a pressure washer it should clean it up

      Reply
  14. Josiah Brown

    What is the best way to finish kitchen items? (specifically turned cups and cutting boards) Is oil enough to protect the wood longterm? In the past, pieces that I’ve finished with oil only have lost a lot of the shine/beauty over time.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Mineral oil works great, but has to be refreshed regularly to keep looking good.

      Reply
    • Mark

      I use salad bowl finish on all of my boards that I make and my utensils. You can find it at rockler

      Reply
  15. Vic Jones

    I need to paint a kitchen table white. It will have heavy use. I want a professional final look. What paint and what application process would you use.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Enamel paints work well, or you can apply polyurethane as a top coat over paint.

      Reply
  16. Ron

    Buying your DVD on Make a Quality Door but the PDF at the end of Disc is for making a planter. How do I get the Door Measurement formula sent to me. Customer Service said they would do so but not results and that was two week ago. Don’t have to put this on air just please send me correct PDF. Thank you, Ron

    Reply
  17. Mark Bristow

    I am going to cut plates of wood from a ash that dropped. How can I keep the bark from coming off? I was told to place them in a oven to kill any bugs so this will dry it as well right?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      An oven will certainly dry the wood. I don’t know what it takes to kill bugs, and you certainly don’t want to transport any Emerald Ash bugs. Pentacryl will stabilized the wood, but I think you’d have to use it before putting the wood in the oven. Best to check with the Pentacryl manufacturer. http://www.preservation-solutions.com/product/pentacryl/

      Reply
  18. Joe

    No question, just a thank you for mentioning shellac as pre stain conditioner last month. We had always used M. W. prestain with good results until the last project. We tried the shellac on birch and it worked great

    Reply
  19. piperpilot

    I often get very small ripples in the surface when I use a thickness planner. The ripples are 90 degrees to the movement of the wood through the planner. Our wood shop maintains the equipment very well with monthly maintenance on all our equipment. Any Ideas what causes this.
    Dave, Huntley, IL

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      If the knives are sharp it could be that you have one knife out of alignment with the others. One or two high knives mean they’re doing all the work, and you won’t get the surface finish you should.

      Reply
  20. Josiah Brown

    Do you have a recommendation for dust collection? I am building a new shop and want to invest in what is best for the long run. I have heard that a single mobile dust collector which connects to individual tools will work fine (one i’m considering is called the mini gorilla), but is a stationary system which connects to all tools along the wall work better?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      It’s hard to beat the convenience of a single stationary dust collector. All you have to do when you get to the tool is open the blast gate. But that system will be more expensive; probably a larger collector, and you’ll use more pipe. If budget constraints mean a single portable unit, that’ll work.

      Reply
  21. bucketman148

    What’s the best way to make new wood looked distressed? I’ve built a kitchen hutch out of rock maple and sanded with 220 grit – but now my wife wants me to make it look weathered and distressed – like reclaimed bar wood, for example

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I used to know a guy that wood drag table tops down a gravel driveway to distress them. It worked, but was a little extreme. Poke it with a scratch awl, do random grinds with an angle grinder (equipped with sandpaper), carve it with a bench chisel……

      Reply
  22. Rod

    How do you properly use a table saw tapering jig when the stock to be angle cut is longer than the jig itself? -(from Edmonton, Alberta)

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Answered at 56:40. Check the additional links provided with the time code for additional tapering tips.

      Reply
  23. Richard

    What’s the difference in use of brass inserts verses steel inserts in woodworking jigs?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m not certain, since I’ve always used brass. Maybe the steel is more durable? But I’ve never had a brass insert fail. If a cutting tool nicks into brass there won’t be much damage to the cutter. Not so with steel.

      Reply
  24. Russell

    I am in Emily, MN and I like the new setup as it is clear and the audio is very good.

    Reply
  25. jred7713

    J-RED in KS says Video has been good and the Audio has been Terrific!!! Thanks for a great show.

    Reply
  26. Ron

    Plano, TX…not a fancy place…just Plano Texas. Video much better and so is audio. Could use more light on close ups. (I’m a former TV Director for Public TV)

    Reply
  27. Joseph Yunkman

    You can make the camera zoom and pans smother by using and zoom control in the handle and a good tripod

    Reply
  28. Satanand

    I am in Canada. My second question: I want to refinish my furniture that currently has a polyurethane type finish. Please recommend a stripper, and let me know if strippers affect the glue in the joints. Thanks.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t know much about strippers. I’d look in your area for a store that specializes in finishes (Sherwin Williams in my area) to see if they have a suggestion.

      Reply
  29. James

    Great broadcast great quality. Would like to hear your thoughts on using pvc for piping on 3 HP cyclone dust collection system.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      PVC can be used, but I think you need to run a ground wire through the pipe to prevent sparks from static. Be sure to use dust collection fittings (like Ys) not plumbing fittings for your connections.

      Reply
  30. John hallett

    From Perth, Western Australia,
    Thank you so much for an excellent q/a session.
    Regards John

    Reply
  31. SAMSON

    Hi George
    I have just joined WGOA and have watches some of your videos, they are very interesting and detailed. I live in South Africa, so the exchange rate is a challenge at present. I certainly would like some of the equipment us use on your router table and the drill press. Is there a store in South Africa that u supply with all of the tools and equipment that I can visit.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m glad you’re enjoying WWGOA. No, we don’t have a store in SA to point you to. Sorry. Say hello to South Africa for me. I lived in Swaziland for three years and traveled to Durban frequently, and also made it to Cape Town once.

      Reply
  32. ivan raitchev

    Hi George and thank you for the great show. Would you please send me an info, how to build a table saw jig, as I do not want to waist your time on air? Many thanks. Regards. Ivan

    Reply
  33. Kenneth Alves

    When turning a bowl,how do you, keep the rim equal? I have trouble with that. Sometime a little bit or lot off.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      If the bowl is balanced and turned round, the rim should be consistent. If you’re working with green (wet) wood the material can start to change shape while you’re turning it, which can affect the rim. Have a look here http://www.wwgoa.com/?s=bowl%20turning for some bowl turning tips.

      Reply
  34. thunderbill

    You mentioned that you weren’t aware of any other manufactures that made a “safety” table saw but there is at least one. Bosch came out recently with a “safe” version of their very popular 4100 called the Reaxx. In a search engine AD they state: “The Bosch Reaxx Jobsite Table Saw Will Save Your Fingers Without Destroying Your Blade.” You might want to check it out.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Good point, but since the Bosch machine hasn’t hit retail yet I figured he couldn’t have been talking about problems with the Bosch saw.

      Reply
  35. thunderbill

    BTW, You’re my “go to” source for all things woodworking. I joined last year and upgraded this year. Love your videos but don’t know what’s causing the long, unexplained freeze-ups. With a 12 mbps line that shouldn’t happen. Anyway I wanted to pass along some kudos to you and your staff for a job well done. In all my 77 years experience I’ve never been as satisfied with what is basically an instruction session.

    Reply
  36. Chris

    Audio and sound much better and I’m watching after the event because of the time difference from just south of London in the UK.

    Reply
  37. Mooris Mntoninzi

    Is Dado Set need any size of a blade hole to fit or Dado Set fit any table saw size?

    Reply
  38. Mooris Mntoninzi

    I need Dado sets but I was told that my table saw hole size needs to be 16mm no other size. is this true? Is there no Dado sets fo all table saw machines?

    Reply