WWGOA GOLD LIVE: Through Dovetails on the Bandsaw

In this WWGOA GOLD LIVE event, George Vondriska demonstrates how to turn your bandsaw into a dovetail machine. With a little practice and a simple shop-made jig, you’ll be cutting through dovetails on your bandsaw in no time. One of the benefits of mastering this technique is that you can vary the spacing, giving you the chance to let your dovetail creativity come through.

THIS EVENT IS ONLY AVAILABLE FOR WWGOA GOLD AND PLATINUM MEMBERS

Log in now to view the event or become a GOLD Member today by clicking here and choosing the GOLD membership option!

Discussion
  • (will not be published)

59 Responses to “WWGOA GOLD LIVE: Through Dovetails on the Bandsaw”
  1. Marc Spencer

    Will this be available for download after the session? I will, unfortunately, be unable to attend. (I have to work.)

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Wayne. The class is on Wednesday. I am sorry for the confusion.
      Thanks
      Jean-WWGOA Video Membership

      Reply
  2. toddworld

    Hello from Houston, TX! Thanks George for your contribution to the world of Woodworking – you’re leaving a great legacy!

    Reply
  3. marc.spencer.kc

    Will this be recorded and available for Gold/Platinum members to d/l for later viewing? I am unable to attend due to my job.
    Thanks,
    Spence

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Marc. Yes, you will be able to view this by logging into your membership. If you have any questions, please contact our customer service team at 1-855-253-0822.
      Thanks
      Jean-WWGOA Video Membership

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Table saw? A 40-tooth alternate top bevel would be great. Bandsaw? Depends on what the application is. Resawing…1/2″ 3-4 TPI blade. General purpose….1/4″ or 3/8″ 4 TPI.

      Reply
  4. Dwight Seigenthaler

    I know that dovetails are a very strong joint for drawers, but investing in a dovetail jig might be kind of expensive for the few times I would use it. How good are dovetails made with a saw or router?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Dovetails are dovetails, no matter how you cut them. Gazillions of dovetailed drawers were made long before there was such a thing as a router or bandsaw.

      Reply
  5. Frank Albert

    You’ll probably answer this question before you see mine but, when re-sawing boards there is a way (or ways) to eliminate blade drift. How much blade drift should you expect in cutting dovetails and will you be demonstrating how to eliminate blade drift in doing so?

    Reply
  6. Gary

    Thanks for providing the “Live in 30 Minutes” link. Saved me from digging through old emails.

    Reply
  7. Gary

    You show a photo of a Japanese saw. Can you go into some details about what to look for in the double-sided saws? I know one is for ripping and one is for cross-cut but I’d like more information about other options of what to look for when buying one.

    Reply
  8. Gareth

    Hi. This is a great time for us South Africans. 8 pm our local time today, when usually it’s early am hours for live broadcasts. That’s way past first rounds and “airplanes flying overhead”… Thanks looking forward to it!

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Jeffry. As a platinum member you are able to have access to the Live events. Once you are logged in you can click on the Videos tab and click on Gold Live. There you can view the live event. If you have any questions please give our customer service team a call at 1-855-253-0822.
      Thanks
      Jean-WWGOA Video Membership

      Reply
  9. Brian

    why don’t you use your jig to get the blade at the right angle to the work piece to complete this base cut?

    Reply
  10. Bill

    Would it make sense to cut the waste out for pins with the boards placed on you jig? Doing so would eliminate the need to tilt the board at angle.

    Reply
  11. William

    I’ve heard cohesion (glue both sides to be joined) is superior to adhesion (gluing only one side of the board). Your thoughts?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      The harder the wood, the more careful you have to be about hitting the layout lines. If the joint is too tight, the fibers of a soft wood will compress, possibly allowing the joint to still go together. Too. Tight on hard wood and it’ll probably split.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      There are fine lines from the bandsaw blade, but if you use a 10 tpi blade and cut nice and straight, they won’t be too obvious.

      Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Richard. You can watch the Live Video by logging into your account and clicking on the Videos tab and then click on Gold Live. If you have any questions, please give our customer service team a call at 1-855-253-0822.
      Thanks
      Jean-WWGOA Video Membership

      Reply