WWGOA LIVE! March 2016

The luck of the Irish was with us, we had no technical issues at all. Here’s what we covered, and where you can find it in the archived video.

1:03 Books on rustic furniture
2:15 Mixing dye with stains/preconditioning wood
8:20 Drilling holes for marbles in games boards
11:20 User friendly CAD software (WWGOA SketchUp Class)
11:20 Setting up lock miter bits (For more info, look at Cutting a Lock Miter Joint)
15:20 Sharpening lathe tools (More here on sharpening lathe chisels and low speed grinders)
21:23 Sheba the Benchdog
21:30 Applying shellac, it’s drying too fast
22:40 Wrapping sandpaper on a drum sander (More on this here: Wrapping Sandpaper on a Drum Sander)
28:50 Painting Corian (solid surface countertop material)
30:58 Software for CNC routing
31:58 End grain cutting boards and finish (More here on making an end grain cutting board)
34:58 Glue for cutting boards
36:02 Adding a dust port to a band saw
38:13 Jointer set up (Info on setting jointer knives and Mastering the Jointer)
44:27 Brushing on finish or spraying finish?
45:15 Table saw choice: Hybrid vs contractor
46:22 Dewaxed shellac or wood conditioner?
47:10 George’s clean shop (Video download on shellac)
48:19 Pith in bowl blanks (How to Cut Bowl Blanks from Logs)
52:19 Finish for tables (Lots of info here on wood finishing techniques)
52:45 How much glue to apply
55:00 Machines used for sharpening lathe chisels
55:56 George’s shop
58:08 Finding content on WWGOA.com
59:20 Tools for beginner woodworks (George’s Top Five Stationary Tools)
1:02:12 George’s favorite St Paddy’s Day joke

Discussion
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113 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! March 2016”
  1. john freeman

    After turning a spigot and roughing out a green bowl blank, how do you reattach the bowl to the chuck when the spigot has become elliptical after it dries?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t think there’s a fix for this that would make the spigot round again. You could try gripping the elliptical spigot to see if there’s enough bite on it to safely turn the bowl.

      Reply
    • Rich

      You have to jamb chuck the bowl and re-turn tenon to round again. A twice-turned bowl will warp more or less all over.

      Reply
  2. daslagg

    George, First of all, thanks for the live stream. It is good to see the different procedures demonstrated.
    My question: I made a dining room table out of construction grade lumber with the top made of #2 common 1x10s. I used Varathane Satin Triple Thick Polyurethane (water based) as a finish over sanding sealer for the pine and Minwax stain. I put on 4 coats of poly on, sanding between coats on a distressed top. The poly was to be self-leveling so I thought it would fill the distressed areas and be level on the entire top. It did not! Where the distressed spots are, it filled them but did not make them level with the rest of the table. The second problem is when the grandkids do their homework, the finish is not hard enough and the pine takes the imprint of their handwriting. What can I do at this point to get a level finish and hard enough so that the pine won’t accept imprints. Will an oil-based finish rectify the problem and can it go over the water-based poly? Or do I need to do something else?
    Thanks for you help. David

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Sounds like a cool project. Outside of the two-part epoxy finishes, most finishes won’t go on thick enough to level out high and low spots. If Varathane claims that their Triple Thick will do this, I’d contact their customer service dept to see what advice they have. I haven’t tried the two-part epoxies (often called bar finish) but I’ve seen table that have items inset into the table, with a dead flat coat of epoxy over everything. Regarding protecting the pine…It sounds like you may not have the finish on thick enough. If the kids are simply writing at the table, not pressing down like crazy, I would think a good coat of poly would provide protection. You have to be very careful of compatibility if you put another finish over what you’ve already done. If there’s any question, a coat of dewaxed shellac (Zinsser Seal Coat) is a great finish to put between coats.

      Reply
      • Newell Monroe

        What is the best way to do a chopping block flat or end grain and what would you use to finish it when all glued together an done.

        Reply
        • Bandit

          End grain, no nut oil can go bad , they do make a bucther block oil there are some others i am not sure of

          Reply
  3. Deborah

    Is luan 4×8 comparable to birch 4×8 to use as wall material in a vintage travel trailer?

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      It will look very different. Luan is more porous and darker. Functionally I would think it would be roughly equivalent. Birch might have slightly better holding power for hanging things on the wall due to the porousness and brittleness of luan, but I’m just speculating on that. I think you’d be fine with either.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Maybe a featherboard? Use it to keep your material tight to a fence or table, depending on what your working on. It should apply some pressure, but not so much that it’s hard to push the stock past it.

      Reply
  4. Michael O'Brien

    Hi Marc,
    Michael from Australia. Thanks for your replies re the Roubo Bench. I haven’t decided yet but may run with two benchcrafted tail vises. Looking forward to this live video – and my project.

    Reply
  5. Walt

    Best way to stack wood for air drying. Just cut down a large walnut and will be milling to 10/4 thickness

    Reply
  6. Lee

    When installing large crown molding, and you need a secondary piece to reach the other wall, do you butt joint them, or cut an angle that overlaps?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Please check resources such as The Family Handyman Magazine for home improvement questions.

      Reply
  7. Newell Monroe

    What is the best way to do a chopping block flat or end grain and what would you use to finish it when all glued together an done.

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      And end grain cutting board requires more work, but produces a more durable cutting surface that is more gentle on knives. To finish it you would use a food safe finish that can be easily refreshed after some washings. Typically mineral oil or butcher block finish is used. Butcher block finish is typically just food safe mineral oil with beeswax in it.

      Reply
  8. Steve Johnson

    I have a new Super Max 19-36 drum sander, having problems loading sanding sheets on drum. Can you load a sheet on yours now ? Any “tricks of the trade” would be greatly appreicated!

    Reply
  9. Barry

    Do you know of morticing kit for Porter Cable 15 inch, 12 speed floor model? If not, best bit/method to mortise with drill press?

    Reply
    • Barry

      Model number is PCB660DP. Looking for mortising kit or advice on how to make mortises with drill press. Thank you. Live video was great, as is your site, knowledge, and teaching ability.

      Reply
      • George Vondriska

        Thanks for the compliments. I searched PCB660DP mortise, and some people are saying the Delta mortise attachment fits. I recommend you measure the quill on your machine, and compare it to the diameter of the quill attachment of the Delta model to see if they’re compatible.

        Reply
  10. Roy Shrove

    George, Living in Texas with the heat, I have never been able to get a reasonable finish with Shellac due to the rapid drying. Any suggestions or alternatives?

    Reply
  11. Eric Pomeroy

    I’m new to woodworking and the biggest problem I have is using a router because I am not sure how to build a jog to do what I need to, any suggestions?

    Reply
  12. Lee

    When installing large crown molding and a secondary piece is necessary to reach the opposing wall, do you Butt Joint them or cut an angle and overlap them?

    Reply
    • ezgoing

      It’s usually best to use a scarf (angled cut) joint… but that is more of a home improvement type thing, which is why George didn’t reply (I assume).

      Reply
  13. Walt Liggett

    Is spray finishing superior to applying brushed on coats? This would be for a walnut farm table.

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      If you are skilled with spraying equipment you can likely get a better surface, and finish the job more quickly when spraying. You can achieve a good quality durable finish with either method.

      Reply
  14. Mark Redd

    Hi George my name’s Mark and I’m considering buying a new table saw for my garage shop. I’m looking at buying either a contractor saw or a hybrid saw my question is is there a real advantage to purchasing a hybrid saw over a contractor saw for a hobbyist.

    Reply
  15. Jason Hudzina

    I have the Incra Mitre Express, what would be the best way to align this to the mitre slot? I’ve used the included instructions but it is still ever so slightly out of square.

    Thanks

    Reply
  16. highchair

    George the screws on my kitchen cabinets hinges( European style) on the cabinet side keep coming loose . Any tricks to stop this I hate to go to the next size screw Tom

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      Tap a toothpick into the hole, and snap it off leaving a piece still in the screw hole. Then put the screw back in there and it should tighten nicely.

      Reply
    • ezgoing

      If the toothpick idea that Paul Mayer doesn’t work (maybe too much damage to the area around the screw threads), drill the hole much larger, say 1/4″ or larger if needed, glue in a dowel, after it dries cut it flush and re-drill a proper size hole for the screw. What would bother me is ‘why’ does the screws loosen in the first place? Too much weight for the hinge, mis-aligned hinges, screws stripped out during first install etc…? Cure the cause, fix the problem and you won’t be doing this again.

      Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      It depends on your goals. For occasional resawing, I like the Timberwolf 1/2″ 3TPI. If you are going to do a lot of resawing, then a carbide tipped blade like the Laguna Resaw King is great. I’ve also found that the Resaw King blade is easy to setup and get good results, compared to other blades which seem to be more finicky.

      Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      A bathroom project will be exposed to moisture, so I’d suggest that poly will be your best bet. Wipe it on, spray it or brush it; your choice. But poly is a great product for moisture resistance.

      Reply
  17. Wesley Morgan

    When I apply glue to joint, I get more squeeze out than desired. How do I determine how much glue is enough?

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      You want consistent squeeze out along the entire length of your joint; no gaps in the squeeze out. Anything more than that is unnecessary, but as you are experiencing it is tough to know until you pull the joint together. Some of this is just a matter of gaining experience. One thing that I do sometimes on edge joints is put a light coat of glue, spread it with a brush, pull the pieces together and see where I have gaps in the squeeze out, then pull it apart and hit the gap areas with a bit more glue.

      Reply
  18. Katie

    What brand of bandsaw blades do you prefer? What blade size do you use the most?

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      George likes a 3/8″ 3TPI blade on his general purpose bandsaw. He also has another bandsaw that is setup with a resaw blade. I prefer a 1/2″ 3TPI, but I only have one bandsaw, so I use that blade for resawing and curved cuts. When I have a large resaw job, I switch to a 3/4″ Resaw King blade, which is a variable spaced tooth blade. 3-4 TPI I believe.

      Reply
  19. Gary White

    Every time you make something, throw away a marble. When you’ve lost all your marbles, you are a true woodworker.

    Reply
    • Paul Mayer

      I built a cabinet to store mine. Some sort of shelving or cabinet system should work well.

      Reply
  20. Brian

    What’s the name of the sharpening tool George is using to sharpen lathe tools?

    Reply
  21. Richard

    Question is about what size wire for 100′ distance from pole to building for electricity? And what would be the desire load so breaker won’t trip?

    Reply
  22. Richard

    Your setup for your miter, I haven’t located the video for building the fence and table. Could you direct me to where I might find the plans?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t have a plan for the miter saw set up. The fence uses a Kreg Precision Trak and Stop Kit.

      Reply
  23. BC O'Brien

    Any suggestions for a relatively inexpensive, fairly affective dust vacuum for a +very+ small shop which includes a tablesaw, power miter saw, and a bench sander?

    Reply
  24. Cal

    I would like to know how to figure out how far I should set the fence from my piece of wood when I am using the router.

    Reply
  25. Mario Tabernig

    What is your opinion of electric router lifts, Is it the new generation of lifts?

    Reply
  26. Jim Mcdaniel

    How do I level or co plane my new Powermatic 8″ Planer. It is the Pro line and the tables are separated from each other.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’m not familiar with that particular machine. An owner’s manual would help you a lot. Some jointers have jack screws on the infeed and outfeed tables that allow them to be made co-planer.

      Reply
  27. Harding

    What computer program do you use to do your cutting layouts for timber and plywood panels

    Reply
  28. Jerry

    sometimes when I use my jointer, the width of the wood changes, more wood is taken off one end of the board than at the other end. How do I prevent this

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      One you know your jointer beds are set up correctly, be sure you’re keeping your hand pressure even. If you push harder on one end of the board than the other, that can cause more material to be removed on one end than the other.

      Reply
  29. Brad Brunken

    George – your shot is very clean. As a general rule, do you clean your shop at the end of your daily shop time, or do you clean the shop once a week or just prior to your video conference. I find it easier and faster to clean up at the end of the day. What is your general pattern and why??

    Reply
  30. Roger

    What’s the best thing to get the shipping grease off a new table saw cast iron top

    Reply
  31. Roger

    I’d like to hear more information on what you said about the asphalt floor tiles over your concrete

    Reply
  32. Eric

    What website and device are you using to stream this event? (I see Google in the top left corner) The quality is pretty good and would be interested in using it in my classroom

    Reply
  33. Mike

    Hey. Thanks for the live show. I am new to Woodworking and have a question about what size jointer to buy. You’re a professional and I see you have a 6 inch or 8 inch jointer. 1) Why do you not have a larger one? 2) What size would you recommend?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I have an 8″ jointer, and that size serves me well. You need width for face jointing, and I haven’t had a need to face joint anything wider than 8″, but some woodworkers do.

      Reply
  34. David

    George, Can you discuss the different outdoor woods for projects such as tables and chairs?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’ve made a gazillion planters and Adirondack chairs out of cedar. White oak is another good choice, as far as having natural weather resistance. In general, that’s the characteristic you’re looking for.

      Reply
  35. Mike Kratky

    George whats your opinion on owning only 1 hand plane, I hear that a low angle jack plane with 25 and 38 degree bevel blades is highly recommened.

    Reply
  36. Daniel

    miter saw which is better non sliding or sliding and is a 12″ better then 10″ for woodworking

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      A sliding saw gives you a lot more cross cut capacity, which I think is a big benefit. If you get a 10″ saw you can share cross cut blades with your table saw, which provides some economy.

      Reply
  37. Tom

    What are your thoughts on the Festool domino machine, do you use one?
    Are the results worth the price?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’ve got one, and use it all the time. Very fast, very reliable, very strong joints. Yes, I think it’s worth the dough.

      Reply
  38. Ernie Russ

    I’m from Ontario, Canada. Wayne Gretzky home town. Just caught the end of your live show. New to woodworking, want to build a crosscut sled for my Bosch contractor table saw c/w guide bars. Any suggestions for ideas. Don’t need a huge sled.

    Reply
  39. Peter Huckstep

    How do you store veneers? I store mine on a blue insulation board covering veneer with kraft paper hung from ceiling. Also can you show your shooting plan and any attachments you have for it. Want to build a sanding block for my shooting plan to fine tune. Is this an option?

    Reply
  40. Russell

    The video and audio tonight was much better than the last time. Enjoyed the program and will begin planning questions for the next one. Thanks.

    Reply
  41. George Vondriska

    For those who have raised questions about logging in to their account, or other membership related things, the phone number for Customer Service is (855) 253-0822

    Reply
  42. Chris

    Sound and video better, viewing from just south of London in the UK on Thursday morning 9.00am GMT.

    Reply
  43. Indal Singh

    I really enjoy watching the videos and reading all the updates on tools and woodworking. I am just a beginner and ingesting all the jewels of ideas and creativity presented. Thanks a whole lot.

    Reply
  44. mikegraw

    George, I love your jokes. Thanks for adding a little humor to your broadcasts. I enjoyed seeing the show today. Don’t get to watch them live. It was great seeing around your shop. Maybe you could do a tour around your shop as one of the videos you send out. I would love to see how you have it all set up and learn why you chose the machines you did.

    Reply