WWGOA LIVE! February 2016

Thanks for tuning in to February’s WWGOA LIVE with George Vondriska where he answered your woodworking questions live from his shop. In case you missed it, you can watch the full video here. Make sure to tune in next month for another WWGOA LIVE. See you then!

Discussion
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108 Responses to “WWGOA LIVE! February 2016”
    • George Vondriska

      It depends…. A 6″ sander covers ground more quickly than a 5″. A 5″ sander can be a lot easier to handle, especially on vertical surfaces. Maybe start with a 5″ as an all around, and graduate to a 6″ later if you find that you’re sanding a lot of large surfaces, like table tops.

      Reply
  1. Lloyd Pedvis

    On your next live event on February 17, I was hoping you could talk about what type of screw you would use. I am currently rebuilding the table top and fence for our radial arm saw. I pre-drill holes along the length of approximately 1 inch wide by 3/4 thick by 30 inch strip of hardwood and attached one side to a wood fence I made. We then screwed the fence down the table top made of particle board with laminated top, which had been pre-drilled to match the holes pre-drilled in the hardwood strip, we have a problem with some of the screws breaking when we attach the strip to the table top using a cordless impact driver. When trying to remove the strip, again some of the screws snap. We are using a 2 inch square head number 8 wood screw purchased from a local hardware store.

    Can you suggest a some method, or type of screw I should be using.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I’ve found the screws from home centers often aren’t of great quality. I don’t know if your hardware store is suffering from the same problem. If you’re not worried about countersunk heads you could use Kreg’s pocket hole screws, coarse threads. Be sure you’re not using drywall screws. They’re commonly threaded all the way from the tip to the head. This can cause them to snap. A wood screw shouldn’t have any threads right below the head.

      Reply
  2. sandypaul1020@yahoo.com

    Any opinions on using molding heads on a table saws? Just saw an ad on a set. Any recommendations? Why not just use a router? Thanks

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I haven’t used a molding head on a table saw in a long time, but when I did it work OK. A router won’t mill to the center of a wide board the way a molding head will, and won’t provide the same profiles.

      Reply
  3. wildboy

    What would be the best way to lay real hardwood flooring onto a concrete basement floor. From Pennsylvania, Chuck Faith.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      This would be a good question for a home improvement outfit, like The Family Handyman Magazine.

      Reply
  4. Stan

    In your “Cabinet Making Techniques: the next Level” DVD you made a cool shop made jig with magna switches to make repeatable narrow edge banding in the table saw. I love the idea- been there, made one. However I also love my micro-jig Grr ripper which is capable of doing the same cuts safely next to the fence, with the optional 1/8″ leg it can do very narrow strips. The only disadvantage I see is that I have to remove the blade guard on my Saw Stop, I think the jig more than makes up for it. What are your thoughts?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Either one will work. I like leaving the guard in place when I can, but it’s a little easier to get repeatable results with the Grripper than the magnetic jig.

      Reply
  5. clutions

    Carter Products’ Alex Snodgrass swears that if a bandsaw is properly set up (i.e.: with the gullet of the blade aligned to the center of the wheel rather than the blade as a whole) very rarely should you experience “drift.” I’ve aligned my Jet 14″ DLXPRO this way and I can attest to his statement … I show no signs of drift. The question is “Why do all the manufactures and most woodworkers I know ( until I show them his video and tell of my experience ) swear to the drift myth?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I guess it depends on set up. I’m very careful about how I set up my bandsaw and notice that sometimes I have to compensate for drift, sometimes I don’t.

      Reply
  6. sandy1329

    How do you correct a sagging Hardwood floor around a fireplace without tearing up the floor?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      This would be a good question for a home improvement magazine like The Family Handyman.

      Reply
  7. Patrick Stratton

    We only ave a crowded garage for the wood workshop and can you suggest what table saw . I do have space to tuck in under the bench. I just feel looking at the videos how easy it all seems I could well do with one and now only have an electric circular hand saw which is not the easiest thing to use with all the clamping. Patrick

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Portable (job site) table saws have really improved in recent years. If you’re getting one for woodworking, be sure it’ll accept a dado head. Not all job site saws will.

      Reply
  8. jackrat

    When finishing curved surfaces such as bandsaw boxes, what do you recommend as the best application such as wipe-on polys, oils, etc. Thanks!

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      It’s hard to beat aerosol products for anything with complex, curved surfaces.

      Reply
  9. Jim

    I need to make several cuts in a sheet of 1/4″ hardboard covered with melamine. Will a Freud Diablo 80 tooth table saw blade do the job without destroying the edges too much?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I haven’t used that particular blade but I would think an 80 tooth blade would do OK in melamine.

      Reply
  10. Lloyd

    I am doing a search for a dust collection system in a garage shop with tablesaw, miter saw, joiner, router table with router. What has been your experience with a shop vac connected to a separator versus a larger scale dust collector with higher CFM’s?

    Reply
    • Dan

      If going from unit to unit with shop vac fine but if making it a central system no i have both sets and my exp. Is that a shopvac can do individual unit a dust collection system if your are piping and consider a remote control like what thet use for outside lights not a timer a handheld remote to turn either on or off there are other ways to turn on/off look into mine is out of business but i love it turn tool on dust collection turns on look into them

      Reply
  11. Ed Straub

    I understand the differences of wood glue, I use titebond, but when should I use the other glue up products on wood? I see a lot of video’s, and they use other adhesives for different reasons that they really don’t explain.

    Reply
  12. Mike Lawyer

    When I’m making a cabinet case, drawer, or box of some kind and I measure the corners to see if it’s square, it usually isn’t. I’ve never seen on a wood working show how to make it square before the glue dries. Can you help? So, how do you make a box square after it is glued up and the clamps are on and after measuring it you find it two inches out of square?

    Reply
    • gnuckols

      Provided that opposite sides of the box/case are the same length (and the boards themselves are cut square), you can fix an out-of-square glue-up by skewing clamps in the direction of the longer diagonal. (This is assuming you’ve checked for square by measuring and comparing the diagonals.) Hard to describe via text, but here’s a video link: http://www.wwgoa.com/video/perfect-carcase-assembly-000302/

      Reply
    • Tim

      Use a framing square. I always let
      my drawer bottoms extend past the back and tack it in place while using a framing square to keep it all aligned.

      Reply
  13. Andy

    I am making a jewelry box from tiger maple. I have been using rub on poly. I would like to use something different that brings out the beauty if the tiger maple. Any suggestions?

    Reply
  14. David

    If the veneer in an antique veranda hutch is coming up or bubbling up from the counter how would you repair it to stay down on the counter flat the way it was supposed to when we bought it?

    Reply
  15. David

    How do you relay veneer to stay down when it is popping or coming up from the edges? I’ve tried re-gluing it but it only comes back up after only a month or two.

    Reply
    • David

      I need something on Veneer and how to repair it on old antique furniture? Without refacing the entire piece of furniture with stain or Veneer? That would be a big job that I wouldn’t want to get into because I couldn’t do it with good results like when I bought the Hutch.

      Reply
  16. Brian McCool

    I have created a device that has drastically changed my workshop for the better and I think it could do the same for a lot of woodworkers. Is there a tool manufacturer that I should approach for this device or should I try to make & market it on my own? Do you have any recommendations for companies that I could approach for mass production? I’ve consulted with patent attorneys and they have mentioned that while I probably won’t be able to get a patent for this device, it is free of other patents and I should be able to trademark it.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Maybe someone else with experience in this can weigh in. Great that you’ve already contacted a patent attorney.

      Reply
  17. Dave Petrocelle

    I am creating a basement workshop. What is the best wall material? I am thinking about using DriCore squares for flooring over the concrete. Your thoughts on this would be appreciated.

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Drywall is inexpensive, so hard to beat from that perspective. Plywood on the walls means you can hang anything anywhere, which is handy. I’m not familiar with DriCore

      Reply
  18. Rob

    I have a number of pallets and want to plane the boards. Would my Delta joiner be able to handle this or do I need a planer? Board width are about 4″-6″.

    Reply
    • Brad

      You really need both to prepare the wood for your project. Once you have two edges joined, you can get a very nice piece of wood after you run the other tow edges through the planer. Check for nails and screws. It takes a nano second to ruin a set of blades.

      Reply
      • Mike

        You are correct that a joiner and a planer should be used, but you do not joint two edges.
        rather you joint one edge and one face, then place the jointed face down as you run it through the planer.
        If you joint both faces, they may not be parallel or wedge shaped if you will.

        Reply
    • Brad

      It could be a issue of your sander running too slow, pressing too hard and not finishing the project with a finer grit sand paper. A grit of 180 or 240 will erase most surface scratches and will make your wood ready for finish. Hope this helps. Give it a try.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Brad makes a great point. There’s a lot to be said for how you handle the sander. Don’t lean on it. Don’t rock it.

      Reply
  19. Lou

    Can you recommend a planning tool/site when preparing for a segmented wood turning project such as a bowl, I.e., length and width of segments depending on the project size/design?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      I don’t know a lot about furniture refinishing. I’d check with a finish supply store, like Sherwin Williams, to see if there are strippers that will cut polyurethane. Otherwise, it’s sanding. But there may very well be refinishing techniques out there that I’m not aware of.

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Watch for an upcoming article from Paul Mayer on the first $1000 to spend on tools. While there are a handful of “it depends” involved, it’ll give you some great information.

      Reply
  20. Chris mcconnell

    Just got a lathe, what tools do you recommend, traditional or carbide if traditional what brand?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Both work great. With carbide, of course, you don’t have to worry about sharpening. I’ve got a mix of carbide and high speed steel in my lathe chisel collection.

      Reply
  21. Paul M

    Where did you get your ear protection? I’ve never seen such a light weight set as you have.

    Reply
  22. Brad

    George. Great job tonight! Plus thanks for putting all the great videos on WWGOA. It is a great resource for all levels for wood workers. Keep up the great work. I sure do appreciate your dedication. My most perplexing question for working with wood is when is it a good time to spend more money on a quality tool versus saving a few dollars on a dependable brand with fewer features. In a perfect world you should get the best, but sometimes a more economical tool that will be used less frequently is maybe the best value. I love my branded tool because they work well, but have others such as clamps, brushes and nominal hand tools that get the job done.

    Reply
  23. hidalgona

    I have always shy’d away from the lathe but now finally broke down and bought one. What kind of project do you recommend to start with?

    Reply
    • George Vondriska

      As a turning finish….1/3 dewaxed shellac, 1/3 mineral spirits, 1/3 linseed oil

      Reply
    • George Vondriska

      Sorry, but I’m not clear on your question. You sure could plane lumber down to 1/2″, if that’s what you mean.

      Reply
  24. katie

    I recently built a deck of cedar wood this spring and after one season of Minnesota summer some the wood especially near the end grain it turned black/grey. Should I have treated the end grain with a sealer to prevent this? Can I fix this problem?

    Reply
  25. Rob

    Thank you George for the planer info. Never thought of a jointer not producing a uniform thickness!

    Reply
  26. Wayne Rutledge

    Did not catch most of the discussion but what I DID catch was very informative. This broadcast was a surprise, a little more notice would be good.

    Reply
  27. itimiller

    Get a head mounted mic the sound is terrible, both you and your assistant, could not listen good bye.

    Reply
  28. James Fergerson

    Your audio is very garbled,and video not very sharp. Would be great show if you up grade electronics. I can take better videos with my phone.

    Reply
  29. Geoff

    When using a router table I get confused on which way you should route a piece of wood is it left to right or right to left. And is it any other way to level a piece of wood if you don’t have a planar

    Reply
  30. Frank Trezise

    I have a drop saw and the rotating table has indentations to lock in at 0 and 45 degrees , but also at 22.5 & 31.62 degrees . My question is why do they have lockins at these strange angle settings , is there a logical reason for this ?

    Reply
  31. Mark

    Im disappointed that the other day i could not purchase due to my address being in australia. And i have purchase late last year.

    Reply
  32. Bob Mayfield

    George, I don’t live to far from you. I’d love to come visit your shop sometime. Possible?

    Reply
  33. Gus Lesner

    Great idea….but…all questions asked are not instantaneous. Tie collect and choose. Would rather see you do the q and a on a simple video and give access as you choose THE PRODUCTION QUALITY AND ESPECIALLY THE SOUND QUALLITY WAS A 1 OUT OF 10. You cheapened the quality of your product and presentations now in the libraries for members. Stick to proven success.

    Reply
  34. fbtool

    I sent a couple of questions by email for the Feb. Live Event and they weren’t answered (none of mine ever are for some reason) Audio was awful….no offense intended, but I think you need a professional onsite for these live events. I wanted to know about the dust collection on your Jet 14″ band saw. It has a 4″ port added and I wanted to know about it and if it works well because I have the same saw and the dust is terrible.

    Reply
  35. Lamarr Wilson

    George, very disappointed in the sound quality this time. Removing the shotgun mike wasn’t the answer. Topics were great and very easilu understood when actual demos were used. Not so much with the narrative-only topics (sadly). I’ll keep watching— you guys keep improving your broadcast craft— and everyone will be happy. 🙂

    Reply
  36. rgmallum

    George, I’ve watched your DVD on cutting large plywood panels with a circular saw and have purchased a new circular saw. Now I need your recommendation on blade selection. For cutting plywood, do I want 24, 40, or 60 tooth 7 1/4 inch blades? Which does the best job? Your comments will be appreciated.

    Reply
  37. John Edmond

    Couldn’t watch the 17 Feb show live and finally made time to catch up but find the audio is TERRIBLE. I’ve loaded the streaming four times with no improvement. I sincerely hope you have a suggestion for me; thanks.

    Reply