Ask WWGOA: How to make an Angled Cut Without a Bandsaw

Ask WWGOA Banner

Question


I am working on a project and need to make an angled cut, but do not have a bandsaw to make the 70 degree point. I am thinking I can use my table saw with the blade tilted. Or, with it on its tall side and use the miter gauge. Any guidance or pointers?

Submitted via email


Answer


You could do this pretty quickly and very safely with a hand plane. Ideally use a low angle plane to minimize the tear out, but any hand plane would do ok with this. You could also set it vertically on a table saw to make a cut, making the cut while the board is still long. You will need to use a jig to hold the work piece securely through the cut. Also, the angle is not critical. You could simply lay the board flat and cut it to a 45 degree angle as well. The only purpose for the angle is to help make it easier to get the burn-in started, so a 45 degree angle would do fine but just take slightly longer to get started. Not a big deal, however.

Hope this helps,
Paul


Related:
Set Up Your Miter Saw For Perfect Cuts

Do you have a woodworking question you’d like answered by an expert? Email your question to editor@wwgoa.com or reach out to us on Facebook.

Please note: questions may be edited for clarity and relevance.


10 Quick and Easy Gift Ideas
Discussion
  • (will not be published)

18 Responses to “Ask WWGOA: How to make an Angled Cut Without a Bandsaw”
  1. Robert

    I saw a couple 1” slabs of cottonwood at my local Restore the other day. I’ve never seen this type of wood in my catalogs nor have I heard about it on woodworking shows on YouTube. What qualities does this wood have and why haven’t I seen this wood in shows, magazines and websites?

    RobertTicket 21079

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Robert,

      Thank you for your patience. In regards to your question-

      It is a soft wood with no interesting grain an little color variation. It isn’t popular among most woodworkers. Most of it gets turned into boxes and crates.

      Sincerely,

      Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  2. modelman

    I have asked you before with no reply. Hope this request will bear fruit. I see on other shows where the
    wood turner mixes some epoxy, with color then adds more with a different color. What epoxy do you use and where do you buy the color and hardner then pour the contents into holes near the edge of a round cylinder prior to turning a bowl?

    Reply
  3. Carl Timko

    Ticket 21887 Is there a finish that is resistant to scratches, say if it were dragged across guitar strings? It needs to be hard and durable. Thanks. I watch the Thursday show every month. From Meadville, PA

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Dear Carl,

      Thank you for your patience. In response to your question-

      The most durable that is commonly available is polyurethane. It is good for using on furniture that is prone to moisture exposure and wear. It is not bulletproof, however, so you might want to also take into consideration how easy it is to repair a finish. Poly isn’t the easiest finish to repair, but if you use a thin wipe-on poly product it’s not too bad. Watco is a great finish for easy repair, but it doesn’t offer much moisture protection, and no protection from abrasion. You might want to consider using lacquer, as it give some resistance to abrasion, and it is easy to repair.

      We’d love to have you be a part of our community. We are convinced you will enjoy the benefits of becoming a member and having access to the best instructional how to videos and professional tips. We would like to offer you a special promotion for your first-year membership.
      https://www.wwgoa.com/?add-to-cart-multi=1&products=3917&skipcart=1&coupon=asr12

      Sincerely,

      Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  4. George

    I have a 10 ft long x2inch x2ft wide slab of wet Redwood. Can I use for making a Beer mug?

    Reply
    • Dave Roman

      I do not know about using redwood for a mug, but you should be aware that redwood dust is very poisonous. You should wear a mask and long sleeves. I found out the hard way when making clocks with redwood. The dust, once it got on my skin, caused such a bad rash that I had to go to the doctor and he had me using a steroid ointment and it took about two weeks to clear up, and that is when I was told about the dust being poisonous.

      Reply
  5. rensenbach

    I have read many articles about shaper and router bits and nothing appears to give a definitive answer about the differences between router and shaper bits. I purchased a Jet Shaper and the manual doesn’t offer much help with regards to this question. I understand some of this comes down to the size of the shank. But what I am curious about is if the quality of a shaper bit needs to be better than traditional router bits. I want to know if they are interchangeable. Thank you, Rick

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hello. In terms of the quality of the bits, there is no inherent reason that a shaper bit has to be higher quality than a comparable router bit. The application is the same, and is very demanding, so both require very high quality for both safety and surface finish. The way router bits mount to the machine is different than the way shaper cutters mount. However, some shapers have router collets available for the machine. The only problem with using router bits on shapers is rpm. Most shapers have a high end rpm of around 12,000. This is way too slow for a small diameter router bit (1-1/2” or less) to cut effectively. Low rpm is why most shaper cutters have three or four wings. A four wing bit at 12K is providing 48K cuts per minute, much like a two wing router bit in a router spinning at 24K is providing 48K cuts per minute.

      So, there are lots of“it depends.” If you want to use a 3-1/2” panel raising router bit in your shaper it’ll work fine. If you want to use a ¼” round over bit in your shaper, and the highest rpm doesn’t exceed 12K or so, it won’t cut very well.

      Thanks
      Paul-WWGOA

      Reply
  6. MICHAEL

    why whenever I cut on my table saw whether it is cross cut or with grain I seem to get blade burn marks on my wood I have fitted a new blade

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Michael. Are you using the fence? If so, the fence might be misaligned, causing the wood to get pinched between the blade and fence. In addition to causing burning this can lead to dangerous kickback so it should be remedied ASAP.
      If you are not using a fence for all of the cuts where burning is occurring, I’m guessing that the problem is related to the blade that you are using. Since you have installed a new blade and the problem persists, my next question is what the tooth count is. If you are using a high tooth count blade, or one that is intended for cutting veneer, and you’re cutting thick hardwood, then it could cause this as well.
      Thanks
      Paul-Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply