Ask WWGOA: How Much Time Do I Have After Spreading Adhesive?

Q: I’m building a jewelry box for my girlfriend for Christmas. I’m looking to flock the inside the drawers, and the inside top half, where necklaces will hang. I’m curious how much setup time I have for the adhesive, if I can spread the adhesive and lay the flocking all at once or if I should do it in sections?

A: The open time will vary depending on the product that you use, as well as the ambient humidity and temperature in your shop. That said, I believe that you should be able to make it in one pass, and I would be uneasy about trying to do it in two phases. You might want to do a simple test on some scrap, and spread some adhesive out and see how long it remains tacky.

Here’s a video on this topic:

You might also be interested in:
Jewelry Box Plans
Glue Tips: Using Denatured Alcohol for a Strong Bond
Methods for Evenly Spreading Glue
Using Contact Adhesive
How to Make a Bandsaw Box
Turning a Small Lidded Box
Cool Upcycled Wood Boxes Using Salvaged Wood

Discussion
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10 Responses to “Ask WWGOA: How Much Time Do I Have After Spreading Adhesive?”
  1. Antonio West

    Hi, I’m building a Two-step stair for the front door since the porch drops to low from the front door to the house. being that this will be outside and will get wet and go threw weather conditions with high humidity is there a specific type of wood to use for outdoor applications?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Antonio,

      I would recommend going to a lumber yard and seeing what options you have locally. Around here, cedar, white oak, Ipe, thermally modified ash and pressure treated pine would be the main choices.

      Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  2. Charles Prosser

    I’m building a square 8″x8″x16′ outdoor 2 front column post that can be painted, but not sure of what type of wood that i can use for this project with a exposure of high humidity, rain and cold weather.

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      Hi Charles,

      Below is what our expert had to say:

      I would recommend cedar for this project. If you don’t have cedar in your area, I’d suggest asking for a recommendation at a local lumber yard.
      Paul

      Sincerely,
      Kate
      Woodworkers Guild of America Video Membership

      Reply
  3. Kevin

    I am bending some 1/4 inch white oak slats for the back of a bench , my question is how long should the slats stay held in the desired shape?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      If you are referring to steam bending, the guideline for that is to leave the piece clamped in your form for at least one hour. I’d probably extend that to a couple hours if you can, just to be safe.

      Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply
  4. kenzen

    Am making some guitar holders that are place on the wall. Been trying to come with a way to attach it to the wall without showing the screws into the wall. “Invisible connection “. Any ideas?

    Reply
  5. Barry

    I have a small shop and would like to add either a jointer or a surface planer. I currently have a table saw, band saw, router, miter saw, and scroll saw. If it won’t fit on a workbench, it would need to have a moveable stand. Which would would you suggest?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      This is a topic that is frequently debated among woodworkers. It really depends on what type of materials you work with and what projects you build. If you buy lumber that is S4S, and you do not need to plane it to make it thinner for your projects, then you are probably better off going with a planer first. If you buy rough cut lumber, and/or you often need to reduce the thickness of your stock, then a planer is probably a better first choice.

      Paul
      Woodworkers Guild of America

      Reply