WoodWorkers Guild of America http://www.wwgoa.com Tue, 03 May 2016 20:37:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Ask WWGOA: Bread Board Ends Pinned http://www.wwgoa.com/article/ask-wwgoa-bread-board-ends-pinned/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/ask-wwgoa-bread-board-ends-pinned/#respond Fri, 22 Apr 2016 20:45:09 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=676668 Readers like you submit questions to us every day. Here, our woodworking experts answer your questions and offer helpful solutions to your woodworking problems. Question: If you are doing breadboard ends on a project that will only be viewed from one side, say perhaps a sofa table or hall table that you never see the... Read more »

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Readers like you submit questions to us every day. Here, our woodworking experts answer your questions and offer helpful solutions to your woodworking problems.

bread baord ends pinned
Question:
If you are doing breadboard ends on a project that will only be viewed from one side, say perhaps a sofa table or hall table that you never see the back side of the top with any regularity, could you glue instead the front third or so, so that you don’t get the misalignment of the front breadboard and field on a regular basis? Or would that lead to cracking, and/or misalignment still?

Answer:
My recommended approach here would depend on how wide the end of the table is. If it is a narrow table, say, less than 15″ deep, then I’d glue the front half, and leave the back half without glue. If it is wider than that, then you will leave too long of a section at the end of the joint unglued and you might experience a separation of the breadboard end from the main panel, leaving an unsightly gap in the joint. If it is wider than that you could pin the joint instead of gluing the joint. See the drawing below. The pin going through the non-elongated hole would be at the front edge of the table.

bread baord ends pinned

Have a look at this info related to breadboard ends:
How to Glue Breadboard Ends
Bedside table project with breadboard ends
Build a Tool Chest Class

Paul


Do you have a question for WWGOA? Ask us on Facebook or email editor@wwgoa.com. Note: questions may be edited for clarity and relevance.

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Tips for Building and Hanging a Bat House http://www.wwgoa.com/article/tips-for-building-and-hanging-a-bat-house/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/tips-for-building-and-hanging-a-bat-house/#respond Thu, 14 Apr 2016 16:07:33 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=673808 Quite possibly, no creature is more misunderstood than the bat. An important part of our ecosystem, bats do a number of useful things for humans. According to BCI (Bat Conservation International), there are more than 1,300 species of bats, and they all help us in different ways. Insectivorous bats keep the bugs at bay and... Read more »

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Quite possibly, no creature is more misunderstood than the bat. An important part of our ecosystem, bats do a number of useful things for humans. According to BCI (Bat Conservation International), there are more than 1,300 species of bats, and they all help us in different ways. Insectivorous bats keep the bugs at bay and eat some of our most damaging agricultural pests. Bats that feed on nectar are crucial in spreading pollen for plant reproduction. And fruit eating bats disperse seeds of all kinds, helping regenerate dying forestlands. Despite all this, bats are all too often still thought of as pests!

With their natural habitats disappearing, it’s critical that we help out the bat population. A great way to do this is to build a bat house! We’ve got some step by step instructions on constructing this simple project, and you can find the project plans here.

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Once you’ve built your bat house, it’s time to starting thinking about where to hang it. Here’s what BCI has to say about the best bat house practices.

STAY AWAY FROM TREES

Placing a bat house on a tree may seem like a good idea, but it’s actually one of the worst places for bats. Trees restrict the amount of space bats need to take flight, as they need to drop 15-20 feet before flying. Tree branches and vegetation just get in the way! Additionally, many bat predators like owls and hawks may be lurking amongst the foliage, making trees a dangerous choice for roosting.

MOUNT IT ON A POLE

Mounting a bat house on a pole can be a good choice, but only for multichamber bat houses. Single chamber houses usually do not work well on poles unless you mount two of them back to back. If you choose to mount your bat house on a pole, make sure it is a minimum of 10 feet off the ground. Though, 12-20 feet is better.

PLACE IT ON YOUR HOUSE

The eaves of your roof are a great place to put a bat house. They get enough space to drop, and are also insulated well with stable temperature. Make sure you place it where they will get 6-8 hours of direct sunlight, preferably facing East or South.

TEMPERATURE & COLOR

Bat houses need to have warm and stable interior temperatures. To help regulate temperature in your bat house, consider different color choices to help absorb or reflect sunlight. Choosing a color depends on geographical location, and BCI has created a color map you can find here.

Now that you know the ins and outs of bat house hanging, consider building one on your own! For more information on the bat house project, check out this article, or download the plans on your own.

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What Our Members Are Working On http://www.wwgoa.com/article/what-our-members-are-working-on/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/what-our-members-are-working-on/#respond Thu, 14 Apr 2016 14:02:45 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=673771 We love hearing about what our members are working on in their shops. When we asked on Facebook to share a photo of your most recent woodworking project, we got a bunch of great responses! Here are some of our favorites. What’s keeping you busy in the shop this week? Leave a comment and let... Read more »

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We love hearing about what our members are working on in their shops. When we asked on Facebook to share a photo of your most recent woodworking project, we got a bunch of great responses! Here are some of our favorites.

What’s keeping you busy in the shop this week? Leave a comment and let us know!

Brandon Rawlinson “Finished my first live edge table a few days ago. Book matched mesquite with ebony epoxy used to fill all bug holes, knots, and cracks.”

– Brandon R.

James Daniel Dobbs “Working on the second of two bookshelves that match my entertainment center. At least 90% reclaimed wood. Thank goodness for Titebond and Kreg Jig.”

– James D.

Ben Fournier “I am new at woodworking and made my living room set out of Douglas fir.”

– Ben F.

Michael Allen “White ash and black walnut bookshelves for a client.”

– Michael A.

Jesus Molina “I made this vanity table out of poplar wood.”

– Jesus M.

Kevin Keplar “I made this Valentine’s Day gift for my wife. It is made from mahogany.”

– Kevin K.

Renaissance Man Eric “Just finished a solar powered inverted live edge dining table. Pine, fur, mahogany, and white oak.”

– Renaissance Man Eric

Corrie Lenius “I just made this floating bed. Didn’t make the headboard though.”

– Corrie L.

Dawn Glencer Ayers “Just made a custom coffee table for a couple in Brevard, NC. (By the way, I’m a nurse by day!)”

– Dawn G.

Shane Shepherd “Built this display shelf out of an old fence and a quakie that fell down in the backyard.”

– Shane S.

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

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In the Shop: Where’s Bruce? http://www.wwgoa.com/article/in-the-shop-wheres-bruce/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/in-the-shop-wheres-bruce/#comments Thu, 07 Apr 2016 15:38:32 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=671951 Every once in a while we like to check in on the WWGOA editors to see what they’re up to in the shop. Here’s your chance to get to know the faces and personalities behind WWGOA and take a peek into their own worlds. What am I working on currently? Well today I needed to... Read more »

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Every once in a while we like to check in on the WWGOA editors to see what they’re up to in the shop. Here’s your chance to get to know the faces and personalities behind WWGOA and take a peek into their own worlds.

where is Bruce
What am I working on currently? Well today I needed to do some house repairs. One project was to fix a kitchen cabinet door hinge where the screw holes were stripped out from excessive use. No problem. I filled the holes with glue, hammered in some round toothpicks, let the glue dry, flushed the toothpicks to the door, remounted the hinge, and then remounted the door. I am hero!

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WWGOA LIVE: April 2016 http://www.wwgoa.com/article/wwgoa-live-april-2016/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/wwgoa-live-april-2016/#comments Mon, 04 Apr 2016 14:37:40 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=671432 We had a guest for this session: Joni Van Dusartz. Joni has been woodworking for over 20 years, including running a commercial cabinet shop. From CNC to finishing, Joni has a lot of woodworking experience. She brought along some of her intarsia for “show and tell,” which lead to some great questions. :24 Intro of... Read more »

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We had a guest for this session: Joni Van Dusartz. Joni has been woodworking for over 20 years, including running a commercial cabinet shop. From CNC to finishing, Joni has a lot of woodworking experience. She brought along some of her intarsia for “show and tell,” which lead to some great questions.

:24 Intro of Joni and her intarsia

3:16 George’s jigs

4:08 Bandsaw resawing/carbide blades? More on resawing

5:26 Benchtop planers/importance of variable speed

6:40 Z zeroing problems on a benchtop CNC

8:12 Pitch on table saw blades

9:18 Step by step for kitchen cabinets General info on cabinetmaking Kitchen Cabinets DVDs

10:56 Joni’s tips on staining wood

12:26 Coiling a bandsaw blade Video on coiling Bruce Kieffer’s coiling technique

16:06 Bat house How to Build a Bat House

15:50 Removing paint from wood

17:05 Prevent chipping when drilling with a forstner

18:26 Joni’s go-to blade for scroll saw work More help on choosing the right scroll saw blade

20:00 Staining wood through and through

21:20 Setting up a mortiser More mortiser info Setting the auger General set up Correct cutting technique

27:17 Intarsia patterns

27:58 Intarsia for beginners

29:13 Drawing your own intarsia patterns

29:51 Scroll saw or bandsaw for intarsia?

31:26 Sequence of intarsia cuts

31:56 Lathe chisel selection Choosing a Starter Set of Lathe Chisels Carbide lathe chisel in action

35:40 Sharpening Check out the variety of sharpening techniques on WWGOA.com

37:20 Fastening intarsia patterns to the material Joni’s video on fastening patterns

38:39 Horizontal vs vertical panel raisers Choosing a panel raiser

40:30 Cutting a straight line on a scroll saw

42:18 Preventing expansion and contraction in solid wood

43:25 Starting out with SketchUp Check out the WWGOA SketchUp Class

45:12 Woodburning or staining intarsia pieces

46:35 SawStop brakes Watch our video on how to change a SawStop brake

48:13 Dust free finishing Here’s a tip on keeping your finish dust free

50:06 How long did Joni’s wolf take to make?

50:38 Protecting tools from rust

52:30 Tensioning scroll saw blades

54:52 CNC parts Here are some samples of what a CNC machine can do

56:40 Taper jig on the table saw Tapered cuts using a pattern Shop-made taper jig Using a commercial taper jig

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Visiting Pony Tools http://www.wwgoa.com/article/visiting-pony-tools/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/visiting-pony-tools/#comments Thu, 24 Mar 2016 22:13:29 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=668455 One of the cooler parts of George’s job is visiting tool manufacturers. He recently spent a morning at the Pony Tools factory and warehouse in Chicago to see how Pony products go together and learn more about the company. You may know them as the Adjustable Clamp Company or Jorgenson, but the company is officially... Read more »

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One of the cooler parts of George’s job is visiting tool manufacturers. He recently spent a morning at the Pony Tools factory and warehouse in Chicago to see how Pony products go together and learn more about the company.

pony tools 1
You may know them as the Adjustable Clamp Company or Jorgenson, but the company is officially Pony Tools now. They continue to make great clamping products, many of them manufactured in Chicago. And here’s a cool fact: the company was started in 1903 by Ms. Adele Holman. Remarkable for a woman to start a business back in 1903 and, perhaps even more unusual, the company has been run continuously under five generations of Holman family leadership, including today’s Chairman and Owner, Adele’s great-great-grandson, Doug Holman.

Let’s take the tour

pony tools 2
That’s A LOT of clamp bars, waiting for the next step in the manufacturing process. I guess it’s true, you can never have too many clamps, especially when you’re making them.

pony tools 3
I think these heads are for the famous I-Beam Clamp. Clamp, clamp, everywhere a clamp. It was really amazing to see the manufacturing process behind these products. Coils of steel, custom machines – all part of a family-owned business.

pony tools 4
No, I’m not poking Jim Luley with a lathe chisel. I’m trying to show the tip to the camera. Jim and I go way back to our Shopsmith days, decades ago.

In case you didn’t know, Pony now owns EZ Wood Tools. They’ve got a lot of plans for moving forward with chisels, chucks, and other turning products.

This was a great behind-the-scenes view of how things work at Pony. Thanks to Jim, Dave, and Steve for the hospitality.

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How to Build a Bat House http://www.wwgoa.com/article/build-a-bat-house/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/build-a-bat-house/#comments Fri, 18 Mar 2016 19:46:56 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=665073 The bat house plan we’re using offers a perfect opportunity to work with youth or large groups. All the parts can be pre-made into a basic kit that’s fun to assemble. It’s a great way to do something positive for the environment (bats are great) and introduce kids to woodworking. Why a Bat House? I... Read more »

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Bathouse & Builders The bat house plan we’re using offers a perfect opportunity to work with youth or large groups. All the parts can be pre-made into a basic kit that’s fun to assemble. It’s a great way to do something positive for the environment (bats are great) and introduce kids to woodworking.

Why a Bat House?

I have bats in my belfry. Well, actually, they’re in my barn where I store my lumber and I’d like to get them out. Although my initial research was aimed at getting rid of the bats, I ended up building them a house. Here’s why. I discovered that many of my long held beliefs about bats were completely wrong. I was surprised to learn that bats are not blind and see as well as any animal. They do have radar designed to hunt flying insects at night, but their eyes work just fine. Also, bats do not spread rabies or disease any more than any other mammal. Finally, only three of the more than 1300 species of bats feed on blood. Most eat fruit, insects or nectar. Bats weren’t as bad as I thought. On the plus side, I learned that bats offer a great many positive benefits to a homeowner with a little property. For starters, most North American bat species eat insects – lots of insects. Some will consume up to their body weight in bugs every night! Think of them as living bug zappers without the annoying noise. They also produce guano, a fancy word for bat droppings. Guano is a potent fertilizer and is actually mined for profit in bat caves in the south.

I decided to build the basic four chambered unit featured on the Bat Conservation International website. They have a wealth of information about bats and bat houses. Be sure to check them out. Here’s what BCI has to say about bats and bat houses.

The Plans

Through my research I discovered plans for a bat house. I learned that a bat house helps you to choose where bats live. I knew then that I was going to build some bat houses. I modified the plans I found on the BCI website slightly, substituting plywood for cedar and eliminating the ventilation slots as they are not needed in the far north where I live. The bat house we present here is designed for the northern tier of the US. Warmer climes may need to add slots for ventilation. Consult the Bat Conservation International website to see what modifications you may need for your part of the country.

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Working with Kids

I enlisted the help of my oldest granddaughter, Jadyn, to help me build a couple bat houses. To keep the project approachable and safe for young woodworkers, I developed a system for cutting up plywood sheets into accurately machined project parts without the hazard of a table saw. Even the angled edges are made using a router bit. All you need to build this bat house is a jigsaw, a router, and a couple router bits (See Sources). Jigsaws are relatively safe tools for young adults to handle under skilled adult supervision. You may want an adult doing the routing.

For younger kids, it’s best to have them pick up the project at the assembly stage. Assembly requires nothing more hazardous than a drill. People love the opportunity to build a tangible object that they then can later observe in service. Kids will get a kick out of seeing something live in their project.

Machine the Parts

For tools, all you need is a jigsaw, a router and a screw gun. That’s it. I will show you how to use these tools to cut and machine the bat house parts without having to muscle huge pieces of plywood around on a table saw.

For a detailed look at how this technique works, check out this video:


bat-house-clamp-zone
Besides the straight edge, you’ll also need two router bits to make the bat house. A pattern bit is my first choice for this technique. It allows you to align, clamp and run the router without having to flip everything over. You could use a flush trim bit to make the cuts. These bits have the bearing at the bottom rather than the top. That requires you to set your straight edge, then turn everything over so the bearing can run on the straight edge. Be sure your pattern bit and/or flush trim bit has a 1” cutter length.

You’ll also need a 30-degree bevel cutter. Again, make sure the cutter is large enough to bevel 3/4” stock.

Layout Bat House Part
First, lay out your part. If possible, use your factory edge as a starting point. The edge must be in very good shape to do this. If it needs to be trimmed, simply lay out your part over-sized and trim all four edges.

Rough Cut Plywood
Use a jigsaw to rough cut the part leaving about 1/8” outside the line.

Align and Clamp Straight Edge Guide
Align the straight edge with your mark and clamp in place. Clamp the whole assembly to your bench or sawhorses to prevent shifting while you rout.

chuck the pattern bit
Chuck the pattern bit into your router and trim the edges flush to your straight edge.

Pattern Rout Using First Panel as Template
Use the completed partition as a pattern for the other partitions. This technique insures exact duplicate parts. Temporarily secure the partition template to the rough cut partition with screws or brad nails. Hold the assembly onto your bench or horses with clamps so it won’t shift as you rout.

Rout Bevel On Partitions, Front and Back
After all four edges are routed flush to the template, flip the assembly over and rout the bevel on the top edge of the partition (C) while the two partitions are still together, giving the bearing of the bit something to ride on. This creates an angled edge that matches the roof angle. Set the depth of cut so you’re leaving a sharp on the layer of plywood you’re cutting.

Use a straight edge clamped even with the edge of the plywood to rout the bevel on the first partition you created, the top edge of the back (A), the front (B) and the two roof supports (G) as well as the back edge of the roof (D). For the roof supports, I like to route the bevel on both long edges of a 1×4, then rip the 1×4 in two with the jigsaw. An uneven edge on the bottom of the roof supports won’t matter to the bats.

Mark angle cut on sides
Lay out the two sides on a piece of exterior grade, 3/4” plywood. Use a protractor to mark the angles at the top of each side.

Rout angle on sides
Rout the angled ends (E) using the same technique you used on the sides; rough cut, and then trim using the straight edge and router.

Drill Access Holes
Drill the two access holes at the top of each partition. This can be done on a drill press or with a hand-held drill. Hole diameter is 1-1/2”. The holes are located 3-1/2” down from the top, and 3” in from the edge.

The access holes allow the bats to move from one chamber to another and regulate their temperature. During the day, the chamber closest to the outside where the sun is hitting will be the hottest. On a cloudy day, that might just be the perfect place for the bats. On a hot midsummer day with full sun, the bats will want to retreat to a deeper chamber where the temperature is a little lower.

Assemble the House

Kit PARTS
Now your bat house kit is complete and almost ready for assembly. For this part of the job, I enlisted the help of my oldest granddaughter, Jadyn. She’s 10 years old and proved herself a very capable woodworker (with a little help from her grandpa).

Roughen the partitions
Rough up all the interior surfaces of the bat house with coarse sandpaper. Jadyn used a 24-grit disc on a hand pad. Make the cuts across the grain. The grooves make it easier for the bats to climb around the house.

Dry Clamp Sides To Partitions
Next, stack the partitions and spacers (F) and dry clamp the two sides to the stack with their back edges up. This insures the two sides are spaced perfectly before you attach them to the back.

Apply Glue To Back Edge of Sides2
Apply glue to the back edges of each side. Bats dislike any kind of draft so the glue serves two purposes here: to make the house strong and to seal out any drafts. Be sure to use waterproof glue throughout the house.

Attach Back To Sides
Attach the back to the sides. Be sure the angled ends of the sides and the beveled edge of the partition line up perfectly. We used self-drilling deck screws, and they worked like a charm. No splitting, no pre-drilling.

Once the back is attached, flip the bat house over on its back. Remove the clamps, partitions and the spacers.

Attach Spacers
Attach the roof support and spacers with galvanized brad nails. Make sure the beveled edge of the roof supports line up perfectly with the angled tops of each side. You could use 1” screws if you don’t own a brad nailer.

Apply Glue to Spacers
Apply a bead of glue on the face of the spacers and the roof support.

Screw down first partition
Screw the partition down onto the spacers and the roof support. Continue to build the interior of the house alternating spacers and partitions. Be sure to keep the beveled top edge of each partition flush with the angled sides. The roof supports are only placed in the front and back chambers.

Attach Bat House Front
Attach the front to the sides with glue and screws to finish the box.

Attach Bat House Roof
Finally, attach the roof to your house with glue and screws.

With the house assembled all that’s left is a bit of touch up sanding to relieve the sharp edges before painting.

Finish the House

Prime and Paint
Apply a high quality outdoor primer to the house. Be sure to seal all the plywood edges, as they are vulnerable to delaminating despite their exterior grade. I also sealed the bottom edges of the partitions inside the house.

Follow up the prime coat with a dark color. For use in the north where I live, a black or very dark brown are required for maximum heat gain during the day. I always thought bats liked it cool, you know, like in a cave, but apparently just the opposite is true. Bats like it hot! Especially when they have little ones in the nursery.

Check the charts on the Bat Conservancy International website for the best color to use in your area.

Apply Roofing Cement
Use roofing cement as an adhesive to hold shingles on the roof. You could install the bat house with nothing but paint on the roof, but it will last longer with shingles.

Apply Roof Shingles
Add the shingles to the roof. I used two layers of starter strip I had left over from roofing our house. Now we’re ready to hang the bat house on the barn.

Bathouse Hanger
I thought it best to have Jadyn’s uncle Ben do the ladder work.

It’s important to choose a good site for your bat house. It should be 15 feet off the ground and away from any trees to avoid predators. A southern exposure for heat is also very important. BCI has lots of great information on properly installing bat houses.

Bathouse on the barn
The bat house is all set and waiting for its new tenants.

I hope you have as much fun building your bat house as Jadyn and I did building ours!

Sources

Bat Conservation International
www.batcon.org

Router bits

3/4″ Pattern bit #817-393
30 degree chamfer bit #115-574
Woodworkers Supply
www.woodworker.com
(800) 645-9292

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http://www.wwgoa.com/article/build-a-bat-house/feed/ 1 Bathouse & Builders download button bat-house-clamp-zone Layout Bat House Part Rough Cut Plywood Align and Clamp Straight Edge Guide chuck the pattern bit Pattern Rout Using First Panel as Template Rout Bevel On Partitions, Front and Back Mark angle cut on sides Rout angle on sides Drill Access Holes Kit PARTS Roughen the partitions Dry Clamp Sides To Partitions Apply Glue To Back Edge of Sides2 Attach Back To Sides Attach Spacers Apply Glue to Spacers Screw down first partition Attach Bat House Front Attach Bat House Roof Prime and Paint Apply Roofing Cement Apply Roof Shingles Bathouse Hanger Bathouse on the barn
Ask WWGOA: Dust Collection Size http://www.wwgoa.com/article/ask-wwgoa-dust-collection-size/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/ask-wwgoa-dust-collection-size/#comments Thu, 17 Mar 2016 13:09:15 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=665261 Readers like you submit questions to us every day. Here, our woodworking experts answer your questions and offer helpful solutions to your woodworking problems. Question: I’m setting up a new shop and I’ve read everything I can get my hands on about dust collection. Now, I’m more confused than I was before doing the research!... Read more »

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Readers like you submit questions to us every day. Here, our woodworking experts answer your questions and offer helpful solutions to your woodworking problems.

woodworking dust collection system
Question:
I’m setting up a new shop and I’ve read everything I can get my hands on about dust collection. Now, I’m more confused than I was before doing the research! My shop is about 300 square feet; the third stall in my three car garage. Can you point me in the right direction on dust collection? How large of a system do I need, and what’s the best way to run ductwork?

Submitted by Jason S.

Answer:
First, on choosing a dust collector. As you have come to realize, the “scientific answer” is complicated, and involves a lot of variables pertaining to the tools involved, the length of runs, duct size, etc. I’d suggest that you work with a vendor that has sales people available with expertise on air flow, so that they can perform these calculations for you and assist with designing your ductwork. Several of the cyclone vendors have people available to assist with that.

If you are trying to set up dust collection on a tight budget, I’d suggest getting a dust collector with a minimum of 2HP, and run 4” ducting with as little flexible ducting as possible. Flexible pipe absolutely crushes your air flow performance, so run hard pipe to as close to the tool as possible, and only use a couple feet of flexible pipe to make it easier to move the tool as needed.

For more information (we promise it’s simple!) on this topic, check out these articles:

D.O.G. Simple Approach for Dust Collection Ducting
Hooking Up Your Tools for Better Dust Collection

Paul


Do you have a question for WWGOA? Ask us on Facebook or email editor@wwgoa.com. Note: questions may be edited for clarity and relevance.

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Dovetail Drawer Assembly Clamping Blocks http://www.wwgoa.com/article/dovetail-drawer-assembly-clamping-blocks/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/dovetail-drawer-assembly-clamping-blocks/#comments Thu, 10 Mar 2016 18:20:57 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=662973 Half blind dovetailed drawers are great, but clamping the joints properly can be challenging. Using clamping blocks that apply pressure exactly where the dovetail pins and tails join is crucial. These simple-to-make clamping blocks do the trick. I’ll show you how to make a batch with just a few machine setups. Once you’re done you’ll... Read more »

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dovetail–clamping–blocks–detail
Half blind dovetailed drawers are great, but clamping the joints properly can be challenging. Using clamping blocks that apply pressure exactly where the dovetail pins and tails join is crucial. These simple-to-make clamping blocks do the trick.

I’ll show you how to make a batch with just a few machine setups. Once you’re done you’ll have a full set, and you’ll be ready to assemble your half blind dovetailed drawer boxes with ease.

Construction notes:

The setups to make the clamping blocks shown here are designed for 7/8″ on-center half blind dovetails. That’s a very common dovetail jig spacing, but you need to confirm the spacing of your jig, and adjust the setups if necessary. The steps given here will make a set of twelve 9-5/8″ long clamping block and twelve 4-3/8″ long clamping blocks. That should be enough to cover your needs for most, if not all, of the half blind dovetailed drawers you make.

Tools required:

  • Table saw and dado blade.
  • Planer.
  • Jointer.
  • Miter saw.
  • dado-layout

    Step 1: Cut 3 pieces of birch or maple to 3/4″ x 5-1/2″ x 10-11/16″, these are your “stock” boards. Any closed grain hardwood will do. Don’t use softwood or an open grain wood. Follow the “Dado Layout” illustration above when you cut the dados to reveal the “pressure feet” of the clamping blocks.

    dovetail-step-1

    Step 2: Set up an 11/16″ wide dado blade in your table saw and cut the dados. Start at one end, cut that dado, flip the board end-for-end, and cut the dado on the other end. Continue the process until you reach the center of all three stock boards.

    Measure carefully, following the drawing, as you set the fence position. Measurements shown are between the blade and fence.

    dovetail-trim-long

    Step 3: Trim away the ends of the stock boards so they end up centered and 9-5/8″ long. Cut the first end so the overall length is 10-5/32″, flip the stock boards end-for-end and make the second cut at 9-5/8″ long.

    ripping-layout

    dovetail-step-3

    Step 4: Rip the stock boards into 3/4″ wide strips. Each stock board will produce 6 strips and a thin piece of waste. Check out this story for tips on ripping narrow pieces.

    trim-short

    Step 5: Cut six of the strips into 4-3/8″ lengths as shown in the “Trim Layout – Short” illustration above.

    dovetail-end-results

    End Results

    This is what you get when all is said and done; twelve 9-5/8″ long clamping blocks, and twelve 4-3/8″ long clamping blocks. These sizes have covered all of my half blind dovetail drawer assembly needs in the past, but it would be easy to modify the dimensions should you find you need other lengths or different pressure feet spreads.

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    WWGOA LIVE: March 2016 http://www.wwgoa.com/article/live-march-16/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/live-march-16/#comments Fri, 04 Mar 2016 14:52:26 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=660714 We had a great Live session March 16. The luck of the Irish was with us, we had no technical issues at all. Here’s what we covered, and where you can find it in the archived video. 1:03 Books on rustic furniture 2:15 Mixing dye with stains/preconditioning wood 8:20 Drilling holes for marbles in games... Read more »

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    We had a great Live session March 16. The luck of the Irish was with us, we had no technical issues at all. Here’s what we covered, and where you can find it in the archived video.

    1:03 Books on rustic furniture

    2:15 Mixing dye with stains/preconditioning wood

    8:20 Drilling holes for marbles in games boards

    11:20 User friendly CAD software (WWGOA SketchUp Class)

    11:20 Setting up lock miter bits (For more info, look at Cutting a Lock Miter Joint)

    15:20 Sharpening lathe tools (More here on sharpening lathe chisels and low speed grinders)

    21:23 Sheba the Benchdog

    21:30 Applying shellac, it’s drying too fast

    22:40 Wrapping sandpaper on a drum sander (More on this here: Wrapping Sandpaper on a Drum Sander)

    28:50 Painting Corian (solid surface countertop material)

    30:58 Software for CNC routing

    31:58 End grain cutting boards and finish (More here on making an end grain cutting board)

    34:58 Glue for cutting boards

    36:02 Adding a dust port to a band saw

    38:13 Jointer set up (Info on setting jointer knives and Mastering the Jointer)

    44:27 Brushing on finish or spraying finish?

    45:15 Table saw choice: Hybrid vs contractor

    46:22 Dewaxed shellac or wood conditioner?

    47:10 George’s clean shop (Video download on shellac)

    48:19 Pith in bowl blanks (How to Cut Bowl Blanks from Logs)

    52:19 Finish for tables (Lots of info here on wood finishing techniques)

    52:45 How much glue to apply

    55:00 Machines used for sharpening lathe chisels

    55:56 George’s shop floor

    58:08 Finding content on WWGOA.com

    59:20 Tools for beginner woodworks (George’s Top Five Stationary Tools)

    1:02:12 George’s favorite St Paddy’s Day joke

    The post WWGOA LIVE: March 2016 appeared first on WoodWorkers Guild of America.

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