WoodWorkers Guild of America http://www.wwgoa.com Thu, 11 Feb 2016 19:35:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 WWGOA LIVE: Q&A with George Vondriska http://www.wwgoa.com/article/live-february-17/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/live-february-17/#respond Mon, 08 Feb 2016 18:03:05 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=648465 Want to ask George a question? He’ll be back to answer all of your woodworking questions during WWGOA Live on Wednesday, February 17th at 7:00 p.m. CST.

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Want to ask George a question? He’ll be back to answer all of your woodworking questions during WWGOA Live on Wednesday, February 17th at 7:00 p.m. CST.

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How to Make a Turned Wood Lidded Box http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-turned-wood-lidded-box/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-turned-wood-lidded-box/#comments Mon, 01 Feb 2016 21:35:56 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=644879 This turned lidded box has the power to make your sweetheart smile on Valentine’s Day, or any other day for that matter. Small is beautiful. That’s because this intermediate level turning project can be done in an afternoon at a cost that can be next to nothing. If you have some rescued firewood or off-cuts... Read more »

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Walnut Lidded Box LEDE2

This turned lidded box has the power to make your sweetheart smile on Valentine’s Day, or any other day for that matter. Small is beautiful. That’s because this intermediate level turning project can be done in an afternoon at a cost that can be next to nothing.

If you have some rescued firewood or off-cuts from thick stock around your shop, your materials cost will be zero. Turning a lidded vessel is sure to boost your turning skills, especially if you’ve never done a lidded vessel before. There are lots of meaty tips presented in this project that can easily be applied to larger vessels. So, let’s get started.

TOOLS

You will need a four jaw chuck to complete this project. Also, a half round scraper, 1/4” parting tool, 1/16” parting tool, and a detail/spindle gouge.

A lidded box is best done as an end grain turning. In other words, with the grain running parallel to the bed of the lathe, just like turning a spindle. Unlike spindle turning however, you will be working as much on the end of the stock, shaping and hollowing, as on the sides. For this box I used stock 2-3/4” x 2-3/4” x 4” long. Dimensions are approximate. Anywhere from 2-1/2” to 3” square will do.

Mark the centers on either end of the blank by drawing two diagonal lines from corner to corner. Mount the blank between centers on the lathe. If you need a refresher on lathe techniques, check the links to other turning-related articles and videos at the end of this article.

PREPARE THE BLANK

rough the cylinder-100

Turn the square block into a round cylinder with a roughing gouge.

Cut Chuck Tenons

Cut a tenon on both ends of the cylinder with a 1/4” parting tool to. Size the tenons to fit your 4-jaw chuck. One tenon will be used to hold the lid in the chuck; the other tenon will hold the base.

TIP: I always taper these tenons just a hair, creating a dovetail shape. This provides a better gripping surface for the four-jaw chuck.

Remove the blank from the lathe and replace the drive center with a four-jaw chuck. Mount the stock in the chuck. Even though the four-jaw chuck can support the piece by itself, I always bring the tailstock up for extra support whenever possible.

Part Top&Bottom2_edited-1

Separate the top (lid) from the bottom (base) with a narrow, 1/16” parting tool. The narrow kerf helps maintain grain continuity on the piece. As you get close to the end, slow the lathe down and lightly hold the base in place as it separates from the top. You don’t want it to spin off the lathe and get damaged. Turn the lathe off keeping the base in place with your hand until it stops. Remove the base.

TURN THE INSIDE OF THE LID

Cut the lid tenon

Cut the tenon on the underside of the lid with a detail/spindle gouge. Start about 1/8” inside the outer edge to form the lip that overhangs the base. End the cut where you want the tenon to start. The tenon defines the opening size in the base.

Use a round nosed scraper to cut a dome shape in the center of the lid. Start your cuts at the center and sweep outward towards the tenon. Sand the inside of the lid to 320-grit or higher.

FIT THE LID TO THE BASE

measure the lid tenon

Measure the tenon diameter on the lid with a divider. Remove the lid and mount the base in your chuck. Narrow the divider by 1/8”. This will give you some wiggle room when you cut the opening in the base.

mark the lid tenon on the base

With the lathe on its slowest speed, center the calipers on the base without touching it. Use the caliper leg closest to you to very lightly score the base. The opposite leg should line up with the score if you have it centered. Deepen the score when you get the mark centered. It doesn’t need to be perfect. That’s one reason why I built in the 1/8” wiggle room.

Shape The Base Top Shape the top of the base with a spindle gouge. You want the top of the positive base profile to match the negative profile inside the lip of the top. Use a round nose scraper to hollow out the center of the base to about 1/2” deep. The hollow should extend out to the scribe made with the dividers.

FIT THE LID

Cut Mortise

Widen the mortise with a narrow parting tool. Make light cuts that taper in toward the center. Fitting the lid to the base will require a healthy dose of patience. You must stop the lathe repeatedly to see how the fit is going. Take very light cuts to start and whisper thin cuts when the fit gets close. Once you get the mortise sized to where the tenon just starts to fit the mortise, straighten out the taper. You will have to adjust the profile on the top of the base to fit the underside of the lid as well. Take your time!

Pencil mark the tenon Once the fit starts getting close, you can rub a pencil around the tenon and the cove cut on the underside of the lid before test fitting. The pencil marks will transfer to the base where the mortise needs to be widened. Remember, super light cuts. Shoot for a snug fit that requires a little pounding with the palm of your hand to get the lid to seat. At the same time, you don’t want to get the fit so tight that you have to pry the top off and risk damage to the piece. You can remove the pencil marks with denatured alcohol (assuming your pencil lead is graphite) or a pencil eraser and some light sanding.

SHAPE THE WHOLE BOX

Shape the whole box

With the lid fit snug, shape the entire box with a spindle gouge. Having the box together makes it easier to create a pleasing, unified shape. I like to undercut the lid a bit as this helps hide the joint where the top and base meet. As always, I bring the tailstock up to help hold the lid in place as long as I can.

Finish the lid With the box profile complete, finish turning the lid with the tailstock removed. Take light cuts. Keep the bevel in contact with the lid at all times. A catch here would be no fun at all. When the overall shape is complete, sand the box to 320-grit.

Measure the base waist

Remove the lid and measure the box diameter at its narrowest point. Subtract 1/4” to determine the size bit to use for drilling out the base.

Drill out base

Bore out the base interior with a Forstner bit mounted to the tailstock. Remember you’re drilling into end grain so go slow with the quill feed. If the opening gets a little clogged with shavings, back the bit out to clear the debris. Use a small ruler to check the depth of your bore. You’ll want to leave about 1/4” of thickness at the bottom to leave room for finishing the underside of the base.

Finish the base interior

Smooth the walls and bottom of the box with a bowl scraper. Be sure to take very light cuts. Easy does it at this stage of the game.

Finish sand interior

Lightly sand the interior for finishing to 220-grit. The sanding will produce a looser, more user friendly fit on the lid.

Tissue shim

I like to finish my pieces on the lathe. But with the finish sanding, the lid is now too loose to stay on by itself. I use doubled up tissue as a shim to create a tighter fit so I can do a final sand with 600-grit, and apply finish.

Apply finish After sanding, apply finish to the lid first. I liberally applied an oil/varnish blend. Wipe the excess with a rag, then turn on the lathe for a final polish. Remove the lid and tissue shim to finish the rest of the box.

Part the base Part the finished base off the block.

CREATE A JAM CHUCK TO FINISH THE BOTTOM

Create a jam chuck

Make a jam chuck out of what’s left of the base block. Turn a tenon on with a 1/4” parting tool to fit the base opening. Use a pair of calipers to measure the opening in the base then add about 1/16”. I hold the calipers in the cut being made by the parting tool. Be sure the caliper ends are well rounded so they can’t catch on the spinning stock. When you cut to the right diameter, the calipers will slip over the tenon. Stop cutting. Test fit the base on the tenon (jam chuck). Continue to take light cuts until you get that tight fit you originally had on the lid.

Finish the bottom

Finish the bottom with a detail gouge. Go for a slight hollowing so the base will sit on its rim. Notice the tissue shim on the jam chuck. Often the base opening will deform a bit after it gets hollowed out. The tissue shim is the perfect solution.

Finish the base bottom on the lathe and your box is ready for gifting. Lidded boxes can be used for all sorts of small storage needs. They’re as fun to make as they are to give away.

Lidded box drawing

Related Links:

Spindle Turning Basics
How to Face Off and Turn End Grain
Using Calipers on the Lathe

Source:

Crown 1/16” Micro Thin Parting Tool, Part # 110-414
Woodworker’s Supply
www.woodworker.com
1-800-645-9292

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http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-turned-wood-lidded-box/feed/ 7 Walnut Lidded Box LEDE2 rough the cylinder-100 Cut Chuck Tenons Part Top&Bottom2_edited-1 Cut the lid tenon Use a round nosed scraper to scoop put the underside of the lid. Use a round nosed scraper to scoop put the underside of the lid. measure the lid tenon mark the lid tenon on the base Shape The Base Top Cut Mortise Pencil mark the tenon Shape the whole box Finish the lid Measure the base waist Drill out base Finish the base interior Finish sand interior Tissue shim Apply finish Part the base Create a jam chuck Finish the bottom Lidded box drawing
In the Shop: It’s All Greek to Me http://www.wwgoa.com/article/from-the-shop-its-all-greek-to-me/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/from-the-shop-its-all-greek-to-me/#respond Fri, 15 Jan 2016 21:30:53 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=639614 Every once in a while we like to check in on the WWGOA editors to see what they’re up to in the shop. Here’s your chance to get to know the faces and personalities behind WWGOA and take a peek into their own worlds. Now that Christmas has come and gone I can reveal what... Read more »

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Every once in a while we like to check in on the WWGOA editors to see what they’re up to in the shop. Here’s your chance to get to know the faces and personalities behind WWGOA and take a peek into their own worlds.

Now that Christmas has come and gone I can reveal what I’ve been working on in my shop. Since these were gifts, Santa had to stay mum.

CNC carved sign

I made this on the ShopBot. Don’t get confused, it’s in Greek. It means “A heart with love stays young.” Birdseye maple veneer over walnut makes the lettering and carving pop.

Mantel Clocks

These mantel clocks are fun and easy to make. Watch for a video on this project. Veneer work again, this time walnut burl and quilted maple.

Magnetic Bottle Opener

People love these magnetic bottle openers, and these gifts were a big hit. Quilted maple veneer, solid walnut, and solid quarter sawn white oak. Check out the free video if you want to make a few for yourself.

Making the gifts is fun. Giving them and seeing people’s eyes light up is even more fun.

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Dust Right® Universal Small Port Hose Kit: Product Review http://www.wwgoa.com/article/dust-right-universal-small-port-hose-kit-product-review/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/dust-right-universal-small-port-hose-kit-product-review/#comments Wed, 13 Jan 2016 18:58:41 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=637301 When I started working wood 35 years ago the power tools never came with dust ports. Those were the days of paper masks, clouds of dust and wading through shavings on the floor. Today, all sanding, shaping or cutting tools have built in dust ports. That’s a good thing. The bad thing is lack of... Read more »

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1Tool Dust Port Hose Kit Lede

When I started working wood 35 years ago the power tools never came with dust ports. Those were the days of paper masks, clouds of dust and wading through shavings on the floor. Today, all sanding, shaping or cutting tools have built in dust ports. That’s a good thing. The bad thing is lack of standardization. It seems like every manufacturer insists on making their tool unique with different dust port sizes and shapes. I don’t know how many times I’ve found myself standing with a hose in one hand and a new tool in the other wondering how I’m going to get my vac hose on the port. I’ve purchased several step down fittings and cut them to the appropriate size. They work OK for larger hose fittings, but for small port on tools such as palm sanders, they are just too bulky. I have also resorted to reams of duct tape and other flexible fittings to jerry rig some kind of connection only to have to undo the whole thing and re engineer a new fitting when I switch tools. Rockler has come up with an answer.

Rockler’s Universal Small Port Dust Kit solved just about every tool connection conundrum I could throw at it – even when dust ports aren’t round. The kit comes with two rubber tipped connectors (1” and 1-1/2”)

2 Rubber tip flex adapter

The two shape shifting rubber tipped swivel connectors (1” and 1-1/2”) are soft enough to fit over odd shaped connectors such as this Bosch palm sander.

The soft rubber tips handle the variations in dust ports with ease. The only exception we found was on an older Ridgid sander with a 2-1/4” port.

3 reverse thread swivel connector Connector copy

Each rubber tip mounted to a reverse threaded swivel connector. The swiveling connector reduces hose hindrance and increases tool maneuverability. The reverse threads easily screw into the open end of the rubber flex hose for quick tip changes. The opposite end of the hose is attached to a standard 2-1/4” port that connects to most shop vacs and dust separators.

The hose itself has some big plusses, but also some big minuses. On the plus side, I loved the expandability and kink free flexibility of the hose. The hose stretches from a mere 3’ to a whopping 15’. Amazing.

4 Flex Hose Short
5 Flex Hose Stretched Long

There were a couple things that disappointed about the hose: the weight and the static shocks. This is not a static dissipating hose, so you are in for a shock from time to time, especially in the dry winter months. The hose was surprisingly heavy (1 pound 13.6 ounces on my postal scale). You may want some kind of hose suspension system to hold the hose up if you are doing a lot of sanding. (I use a bungee cord suspended from the ceiling). Also, because the hose always wants to contract, it has a tendency to pull your tools off the bench when you set them down, especially smaller tools such as palm sanders.

6 Not quite universal

Like the rubber tips, the hose is not quite “universal”. The 2-1/4” fitting was a touch loose on my Dust Deputy, forcing me to get out the duct tape once again.

Finally, although it easy to change the rubber swivel tips, having to unscrew one and screw on another is a bit of a pain, especially when you need to go back and forth between two tools that require different hose ends. It would be nice if Rockler could break with tradition and offer the elements of their kits as stand alone products. That way I could have a hose for each fitting making the changes a whole lot faster. The only way to buy an extra hose right now is to purchase another kit.

The Rockler Universal Small Port Dust Hose Kit is in the end, a great buy that goes a long way towards allowing you to connect just about any small dust port to your vac or separator. I hope some day Rockler will offer an improved hose made with static dissipating material and hopefully a lot less weight.

Source:

www.rockler.com

Dust Right® Universal Small Port Hose Kit
Item #: 48212
$39.99

Photos by David Munkittrick and George Vondriska

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http://www.wwgoa.com/article/dust-right-universal-small-port-hose-kit-product-review/feed/ 7 1Tool Dust Port Hose Kit Lede 2 Rubber tip flex adapter 3 reverse thread swivel connector Connector copy 4 Flex Hose Short 5 Flex Hose Stretched Long 6 Not quite universal
My Introduction to Wooden Boats http://www.wwgoa.com/article/my-introduction-to-wooden-boats/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/my-introduction-to-wooden-boats/#comments Tue, 29 Dec 2015 19:14:39 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=632480 For the past four summers I have made the trip from my Upper Michigan summer home out east to take classes at the famous WoodenBoat (not a spelling error) School in Brooklin, Maine, which is just a stone’s throw south of Acadia National Park on the Atlantic coast. I’ve been a woodworker all my life... Read more »

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For the past four summers I have made the trip from my Upper Michigan summer home out east to take classes at the famous WoodenBoat (not a spelling error) School in Brooklin, Maine, which is just a stone’s throw south of Acadia National Park on the Atlantic coast.

I’ve been a woodworker all my life (a shop teacher for the past 32 years), but when I decided to repair a wooden boat we inherited from my wife’s parents, I knew that I was in over my head as soon as I started. One of my best decisions (I found out later) was to not even attempt the repair without further educating myself. After a short search on the internet, I signed up for a wooden boat repair class at WoodenBoat in June of 2011. During those two weeks, we worked on a valuable canoe ($11,000 when new), a historical 1940 Herreshoff 12 ½ sailboat, and a 1945 catboat. My instructor, Greg Bauer, was (and is) an excellent teacher with enough patience to not get too irritated with my million questions. I had such a positive experience taking the class that I have gone back to WoodenBoat every summer since. Here’s a look at my experience at the WoodenBoat School.

WoodenBoat
Repairing this $11,000 lapstrake canoe’s cedar planks was a very delicate operation. The laps are fastened using clinch nails which are tack-like copper nails that are driven through the lap, then the point of the nail is curled back into the plank. Note the original plank scarfed and ready to accept the new replacement plank on the right side.

Clinch Nail Installation
Clinch nails ready for installation on a lapstrake canoe

Making a template
Here, Greg Bauer is making a template for a new frame by hot gluing many small, shaped pieces of thin plywood together.

Laminating the White Oak Frame
Gene and helpers are laminating a white oak frame with epoxy. Note the plywood template to the right that was used to set the clamp blocks onto the table into the correct shape.

100_0971
This completed floor timber was made from a hot-glued plywood template

Steam bent parts holding blocks in place
Steam bent parts are held in blocks until the wood cools and sets.

Gene making repairs on his 1945 catboat

The WoodenBoat School is… well… a summer camp for adults who come from every conceivable background with one common interest – wooden boats. I have worked alongside surgeons, lawyers, teachers, college students, high school kids, generals, and company executives, to name a few. Everyone at the school is on equal ground with virtually no egos mucking up the works and the friendly atmosphere is almost surreal. I have made many friendships that continue year after year as the school has an extremely high number of returning students, which is the best indicator of how well the school operates. The director, Rich Hilsinger, has been at the school since 1983 and does a fabulous job of making your experience better than you expected. Mike Moros is in charge of the shop and brings years of practical knowledge as the shop manager and sometimes teacher. I hold Greg Bauer, my first instructor, personally responsible for giving me the wooden boat bug that I just can’t shake. He now spends most of his time managing the working waterfront where students can take a wooden boat (over 30 in the fleet) out for a sail or row after class. I have also taken several classes with the “Grand Poohbah”, Greg Rössell, who has been teaching and working with wooden boats on the Atlantic coast his entire life. He’s the master of the master teachers. All of the instructors go out of their way to make you feel comfortable, no matter what your skill level is. Most classes run one week with a few taking two. Accommodations include an on-campus campground or student housing along with a full service dining hall.

The WoodenBoat School’s shop
The WoodenBoat School’s shop is a converted horse barn.

Tablet pics 017
The Maine coast has thousands of bays with beautiful scenery.

There are many different ways to build a wooden boat, each with its distinct characteristics. One of the most popular classes introduces students to the traditional way of building boats such as carvel – where solid wood planks are custom fitted onto an upside down frame (usually), caulked, then faired out so the hull is smooth.

Clamps and blocks holding planks into place
Many clamps and blocks are needed to hold the planks into place on the carvel planked boat.
100_0861
Carvel planked boat being built upside down on a form. Bronze screws are used to fasten the planks to the frames.

Lapstrake/clinker style uses solid wood planks overlapped on the hulls like siding on a house. These methods require a large amount of time and patience along with a high level of woodworking competence to successfully complete a project.

Traditional Lapstrake
A traditional lapstrake/clinker boat is temporally held in place with unique clamps until the copper rivets are installed.

There are also many other classes that teach less traditional building methods such as these listed below:

Glued lapstrake is becoming more popular as the quality of solid wood declines. Plywood planks are glued together with epoxy along the laps to form a very rigid hull. The interior of the craft is outfitted in a manner similar to the traditional carvel and lapstrake boats.

Scarfing plywood with a plane to prepare the wood
Scarfing plywood with a plane to prepare the wood to be glued end-to-end, creating long planks/strakes.

Glued Plywood Lapstrake
Glued plywood lapstrake boat is almost completed and ready for paint and varnish.

100_1502
Class that completed the interiors of these plywood lap boats (Note the good looking man with the white beard in the middle. Doesn’t he look like a skilled craftsman?)

Strip-planking – thin, narrow strips of wood are attached to a form then covered in glass cloth saturated with epoxy inside and out. This is popular with many canoe and kayak builders that usually keep the woods natural color with no paint. Since the fiberglass and epoxy are what give the hull its strength, many intricate patterns of wood can be incorporated into the design without undermining the hull’s strength.

100_1291
Building the top of a strip planked kayak. This kayak was built using staples to hold the strips to the form until the glue sets.

The completed top of the kayak
The completed top of the kayak after the first coat of epoxy and fiberglass cloth.

Cold forming – basically creating a shaped plywood hull by laying up several layers of veneer with epoxy. It’s a very labor intensive process that’s usually reserved for professional shops but is doable for the amateur who likes to put in thousands of staples and get knee deep in epoxy. The completed shell is a very strong, lightweight, watertight hull that’s very durable but difficult to repair if damaged.

100_0957
The veneers on this cold molded hull are held down with plastic staples that are sanded off after the epoxy sets, leaving them invisible. Plastic is put over the hull form to prevent the epoxy from bonding to the form.

The cold-molded hull
Cold-molded hull is ready for fiberglass and epoxy.

100_1044
‘Glassing and epoxying the cold-molded hull is a toxic, messy job.

Stich-and-glue is a process where plywood strakes are wired together, glued with epoxy, wires removed, then more epoxy filleted into the gaps to form a very strong craft. If you want a boat quickly, this is the method for you. There are many, many companies who specialize in CNC produced stitch and glue kits for those who want to build their own boats but don’t have more developed skills or the needed tools required for other methods.

100_0903
Epoxying a stich-and –glue plywood boat using CNC cut parts which are very common in mail-order kits

There is also a class in traditional skin-on-frame kayaks where frames are assembled with no mechanical fasteners then covered with a skin of ballistic nylon. I’ve seen many of these kayaks being built under the guidance of Mark Kaufman. You can pick up the finished kayak with one finger but they retain extreme hull durability.

The frame of a skin-on-frame kayak
The frame of a skin-on-frame kayak which is made with no mechanical fasteners

There are also many other classes available at WoodenBoat besides boat building – woodcut art, bronze casting, diesel mechanics, pond yachts, lofting (traditional boat drawings), sailing, coastal camping, oar and spar making to name a few. Check out the school’s website for more information.

Completed set of hand-made 7 ½ foot oars
Completed set of hand-made 7 ½ foot oars

After years of woodworking, I found that boats are an entirely different animal. There are no 90° angles on a boat, so proficient use of hand tools is a must. Power tools are used, but many times the quickest, most efficient way to do a process is with a hand tool. Block planes, spoke shaves, chisels, and draw knives are commonly used on many boats. Using my father’s and great grandfather’s tools has been a joy for this power tool junkie. Each time I pick one up I feel that I’m somehow connected to them in a spiritual way as they are no longer with me in a physical sense. I have learned to leave the cheaper quality tools at home in the bottom of the tool box and grab a quality Lie-Nielson (made in nearby Warren, ME) or older Stanleys whenever possible. If you are in need of quality used tools, there are many stores in the area that specialize in that market. I spend way too much time at the used tool emporiums in Liberty, ME, always looking for a usable, older quality tool at good price.

I realize that I kind of sound like a salesman for the school but I’m really just a student who had such a good experience there that I want to pass the word. If you don’t believe me, ask any other person who has attended WoodenBoat and you’ll get the same story. For me, the bottom line is that I learn so much in each class that I want to keep going back to learn more. I have been so enamored with these boats that I’m registered to attend The Great Lakes Boat

Building School in Cedarville, MI, after I retire from teaching this year. My interest at this time is to specialize in historical reproductions and repairing older wooden boats that sailed along northern Lake Michigan and Lake Superior shores.

Epilog – I now (so far) have four wooden boats, all needing my attention. Retirement’s going to be good.

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Maine is all about wooden boats and lobster!

To learn more about WoodenBoat School and view their course offerings, check out their website at www.thewoodenboatschool.com.

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]]> http://www.wwgoa.com/article/my-introduction-to-wooden-boats/feed/ 8 WoodenBoat 100_0921 100_0853 100_0899 100_0971 100_0916 100_0980 100_0982 Tablet pics 017 100_1209 100_0861 100_1218 100_1443 100_1495 100_1502 100_1291 100_1317 100_0957 100_0999 100_1044 100_0903 100_1213 20140705_120858 100_1061 Laguna Revo 18|36 Lathe: Product Review http://www.wwgoa.com/article/laguna-revo-1836-lathe-product-review/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/laguna-revo-1836-lathe-product-review/#comments Thu, 10 Dec 2015 16:18:53 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=625530 Laguna recently introduced a new lathe to its product line: the Revo 18|36. This tool features a 2HP motor, variable speed control, and lots of neat features for both bowl and spindle work. Paul Mayer has put this lathe through its paces with many hours spent on a variety of turning projects, and shares his... Read more »

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Laguna

Laguna recently introduced a new lathe to its product line: the Revo 18|36. This tool features a 2HP motor, variable speed control, and lots of neat features for both bowl and spindle work. Paul Mayer has put this lathe through its paces with many hours spent on a variety of turning projects, and shares his perspectives in this in-depth review. Here are his observations.

VFD

Power and speed control

One of the most noteworthy attributes of this tool is its power delivery: quiet, smooth running motor and variable speed control. This is a high quality, sophisticated system that accepts single phase 220V power in, and converts it to three phase power using a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) before delivering it to the 2 HP motor. How does this benefit the user? Three phase power provides a noticeably smoother running system across a range of speeds by controlling the power level at the motor itself, without requiring belt changes for each speed adjustment. On a lathe it is important to maintain smooth transitions from low to high speed, and steady operation with plenty of torque at any selected speed so that you can impart a chatter-free sheer on your work piece.

The 18|36 provides infinitely variable speed within each of two ranges. There is a simple belt change to go from low range (50 – 1300 RPM) to high range (135 – 3500 RPM). Within each power range, the speed is infinitely variable with intuitive dial control. For me, low range is for bowls and most other projects, and I can easily work within the 50 – 1300 RPM range without any need for a belt change. I can also do most of my spindle work within that range, but for turners who like to crank up the speed for spindles, a belt change takes less than a minute and the 18|36 is ready for high speed action. I turned a few spindle pieces with the lathe configured in high range, and it performed impressively, with smooth acceleration and great stability at any RPM.

The sophisticated power delivery system also senses resistance, and compensates by delivering more power as needed to maintain the desired RPM level. I found this to be particularly helpful when operating in the lower speed range while roughing out large bowls. When a large green bowl blank is first mounted, it is critical to maintain a slow RPM (I prefer 200 – 350 RPM for a bowl in the 14” – 16” range) so that blank can be safely rounded and brought into balance. When operating in this slow speed range, the 18|36 stands out in its ability to maintain speed and avoid stalls. As a result, I found I could get a blank round more quickly, and then dial up the RPM to an appropriate speed for shaping operations without stopping the machine. For those of us who have had to disrupt our turning to swap belts for every speed change on the lathe, and struggled to find that “just right for Goldilocks” RPM, the 18|36 comes equipped to delight.

control panel

User-friendly control panel

The anodized aluminum control panel is positioned at an ideal height as well as a convenient angle for easy access and viewing of the large format digital RPM readout. Buttons and dials are large, intuitively colored, and provide smooth operation. A large digital display indicates the actual spindle speed with real-time updates. I get the distinct sense that Laguna did their homework here, and anyone who spends a lot of hours in front of a lathe will appreciate the thoughtful ergonomics of this design.

Convenient reverse setting

Having a reverse capability on a lathe comes in handy for sanding projects. Simply flip the switch to change directions, and now you can safely apply sandpaper to the top of the spinning object for better control and visibility, and direct sanding dust right down the gullet of your dust capture system.

steel bed

Stout frame

The bed on the 18|36 is steel construction, rather than cast iron, which brings stability to the design. Its surface is polished smooth so that the banjo travels on it with low-friction ease. The lathe sits on a pair of massive cast iron legs that absorb vibration and provide great stability when turning large bowls.

on board storage

Ample on-board storage

Convenient on-board storage is included to help you keep track of the accessories that you will commonly use.

tool rest

Impressive Standard tool rest

The standard tool rest that comes with the 18|36 stands out in its class as a solid performing, durable component. The 6mm spring steel tip provides a solid, ergonomic balance point for controlling chisels during turning operations. To me, this essentially means that I won’t have to upgrade to an after-market tool rest as this one should serve me well for decades. Another great detail lies in the mechanism that locks the tool rest into position. The lever locks a collar that wraps around the entire perimeter of the tool rest post, applying even pressure that won’t mar the post’s surface or alter its ability to slide, and holds it solidly under considerable pressure.

cone shaped headstock

Cone shaped headstock

The conical shape of the headstock on the 18|36 extends the work piece outward and while tapering back, providing the user with better access to bowl bottoms without removing the work piece from the lathe. This is not only beneficial with using chisels, but provides great access during sanding as well.

tailstock

Live Center and Tailstock

I found the standard live center to be robust and effective at holding large work pieces steady during some aggressive turning. Even when turning a spindle that spanned the entire 56” capacity (36” plus the optional 20” extension), the rotation remained smooth and steady. The tailstock is substantial, providing smooth adjustability, and the tailstock quill has an ample 4-1/2” travel with a solid locking mechanism. The quill also has some nice details like laser etched measurements that won’t fade through years of use, and a brass tipped locking mechanism that won’t mar the quill as it locks it into position.

Ergonomics

Overall ergonomics, adjustability

The 18|36 is a thoughtfully designed machine in many respects. All of the adjustment levers are large with padded grip areas, and they lock down easily and securely. Users will also appreciate the positioning of the locking mechanisms for both headstock and tailstock which are located on the rear of the machine so as to not interfere with chisel placement during turning operations. The banjo and tailstock are easy to re-position, sliding smoothly on the polished steel bed. The spindle size is 1-1/4” x 8TPI, which is appropriately beefy for a lathe in this class. This machine also includes a neat mechanism to adjust the tailstock if it is not in perfect alignment with the headstock when you receive your machine. Mine was spot-on so I did not have to use this feature.

indexing system

Indexing

For those who turn fluted columns, the 18|36 provides a mechanism to lock the spindle in fixed increments around the perimeter of the work piece. This feature offers the flexibility to set up for 14, 36 or 48 stops around a rotation, with positive stops at each location for setup consistency.

Some Nice Options Available

Halogen Lights

halogen light

What a difference it makes to have task lighting right where you need it when you are turning. Having two high quality halogen lights mounted directly to the lathe ensures that you are always working under ideal lighting conditions, and the articulating mounting arms allow you to easily position the lights appropriately based upon the project at hand. On bowl projects I liked positioning one light to project on the outside and one on the inside of the bowl. On longer spindles it was nice to have one light on each end of the spindle.

bed extension

Bed Extension

The 18|36 functions well on both bowl and spindle work, and the optional bed extension brings additional capacity for both types of work. The extension adds a full 20” of additional length capacity for spindle work, and the step-down design provides bowl turners an additional 7” of clearance between the spindle and the bed which allows for turning of bowls up to 32”. The bed extension also comes with a tool rest height extension to enable placement of the banjo and tool rest on the bed extension which is 7” lower than the bed itself. While I did not turn any bowls with nearly a 32” radius, I did turn a few that were in the 16”-18” range, and had to run the lathe at a low RPM to minimize vibration. That is a large spinning mass of wet timber, and pushes the boundaries of a 500 pound machine. If I were to load up a 32” blank on this machine, I would first build a shelf that spanned the two legs and load it up with 100 pounds of sandbags to further stabilize the machine before powering it up.

mobile base

“Major League” Mobile Base

The 18|36 is a massive machine, so if you have a small shop like mine, you need the ability to move it around the shop. This impressive mobile base provides large wheels on each corner of the machine, and nicely balanced dual gas struts make raising and lowering a smooth experience. With the large urethane wheels engaged I can easily jockey the machine around my shop with one hand.

Conclusions

This lathe is an absolute overachiever in its price range. One additional feature that I’d like to see on a lathe with this much power is an automatic safety brake that stops the machine when it meets a certain resistance threshold, but this limitation is adequately overcome by having a large, highly visible off switch that is easy to reach. Another minor nit is that I’d like to see the tool rest sit slightly lower. It currently sits just a hair below spindle center, and there are situations where I’d like to have a lower point of leverage. I mentioned this to a Laguna representative who indicated that others users have mentioned it as well and they are planning to offer a lower mount for the tool rest within a few months to address this issue. In the meantime this is not critical to me; just a “nice to have” item when it becomes available.

Overall I think this machine is a winner. Laguna has clearly done their homework, and they seem to be making a statement that they want to be a serious contender in the lathe market. The 18|36 stands out in its class in terms of performance, control, superb attention to detail and ergonomics. Given its robust stature and refined capabilities, the machine seems modestly priced at $2,499.

Source:

Laguna Tools
www.lagunatools.com
800.234.1976

Revo 18|36 Lathe – $2,499
20” Bed Extension – $499
Halogen Lights – $149 ea.
Deluxe Wheel System – $499

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]]> http://www.wwgoa.com/article/laguna-revo-1836-lathe-product-review/feed/ 2 MLAREVO 1836-Main-Product VFD control panel steel bed on board storage tool rest cone shaped headstock tailstock Ergonomics indexing system halogen light bed extension mobile base Butter Board and Spreader Set http://www.wwgoa.com/article/butter-board-and-spreader-set/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/butter-board-and-spreader-set/#comments Tue, 08 Dec 2015 18:25:59 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=623435 This butter board and spreader set provides a great accent to a special meal. From a woodworking perspective, it is easy to crank out a bunch of these in a single day, and the project also provides a great use for scrap wood. The convenient on-board storage also provides a nice home for the spreader... Read more »

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butter board and knife intro

This butter board and spreader set provides a great accent to a special meal. From a woodworking perspective, it is easy to crank out a bunch of these in a single day, and the project also provides a great use for scrap wood.

The convenient on-board storage also provides a nice home for the spreader while not in use. The spreader also doubles as a handle that can be used to pass the set around the dinner table. This project is designed for batch production, and you can easily get caught up on your holiday “shopping” in a single day by utilizing each setup to make a bunch of identical parts.

Small projects like this provide a great use for leftover pieces of special wood such as the curly birch used here. For the base I used some small pieces of walnut that I salvaged from my scrap pile.

Let’s build the base first.

butter board and knife - leg
butter board and knife - top

Note that the leg is extra thick, and projects beyond the tenon, to allow an angled cut being made later.

tenon cut on top

Cut finger joints

I used the band saw extensively on this project, as it provides clean cuts, accuracy, and good safety while dealing with small pieces. Test the fit carefully on scrap pieces so that you get the perfect fit on the finger joints. Once you get each setup dialed in, you can run a bunch of these relatively quickly. Careful setup on the band saw is key here. Take your time at each setup, and do not cut past your lines. Leave the leg pieces long for safe handling until the finger joints are cut and fitted to the top piece.

scroll cut

Remove waste on legs

Use a coping saw or scroll saw to remove waste, cutting carefully to each line. If you can get a good crisp line, then no cleanup will be necessary. If you need to clean up your cut, use a sharp chisel and pare straight down onto a sacrificial backer board.

cut off leg

Cut the legs to length

Set your fence to 1-1/2” to get consistency in leg height.

cut arch on leg

Cut the arch

Using the pattern provided, or a coffee can or other round object, draw an arched line on each leg piece and cut using a scroll saw or coping saw.

glue up base

Glue and clamp the assembly

Put a light coating of glue on all mating parts, and clamp using minimal pressure. Be sure that the components remain square during assembly. Carefully remove glue from within the knife storage slot with a small screw driver and damp cloth.

cut angle on base

Cut tapers

Cut the ends at a 15 degree angle, with the angle tapering in toward the top. Cut the sides to a 10 degree angle, also tapering in at the top.

sand and shape base

Sand all surfaces

Sanding is an important part of shaping the final piece. Round over all edges to give the pieces a curvaceous appearance, to match the spreader.

Turning our attention to the spreader…

The spreader is a simple project, which starts with a two board glue-up, followed by some curvy cuts on the band saw.

knife glue up

Glue up blanks

Cut and glue pieces of contrasting wood as shown in diagram.

knife profile

Trace horizontal outline

I like to use a white charcoal pencil on the dark wood, and a normal pencil on the light wood, for better visibility during cutting.

Make cuts

Cut out the shape, leaving the line. Next stand the piece up and trace the vertical profile, or just cut it free hand as it is a simple shape. Again, it is important to leave the line so that you can sand to final shape.

sand knife

Sanding

Carefully sand, first with an aggressive grit, such as 80, to define the overall shape. Then progress through grits up to 220, taking time to smooth and round over all edges.

finish

Finishing

Use a food-safe finish such as mineral oil (shown here) or a salad bowl finish to bring your project to a lustrous glow.

Click here to download the template for this project

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]]> http://www.wwgoa.com/article/butter-board-and-spreader-set/feed/ 19 butter board and knife intro butter board and knife – leg butter board and knife – top tenon cut on top scroll cut cut off leg cut arch on leg glue up base cut angle on base sand and shape base knife glue up knife profile sand knife finish How to Make a Paper Towel Holder http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-paper-towel-holder/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-paper-towel-holder/#comments Tue, 08 Dec 2015 18:22:30 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=623537 Time is a-wasting. The holidays are upon us. If you’re struggling to figure out one more something to build for a gift, then here you go; learn how to make a paper towel holder. This is a versatile piece since it is not permanently mounted to a wall or cabinet. It can be moved and... Read more »

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Paper–Towel–Dispenser

Time is a-wasting. The holidays are upon us. If you’re struggling to figure out one more something to build for a gift, then here you go; learn how to make a paper towel holder. This is a versatile piece since it is not permanently mounted to a wall or cabinet. It can be moved and used where it’s needed, and then stored out of site.

I’ve gifted a few of these over the years, and they are always well received. I’ve used different woods, sometimes expensive and figured wood, sometimes simple straight grained domestic wood, and sometimes a mix of both. It just depends on the recipient and where the piece will be used. This one is made with straight grained ash because I’m giving it as a gift to my wife to be used as an accessory to our kitchenette that I recently completed, and that is ash.

Tools required:

  • Table saw
  • Planer (optional)
  • Jointer (optional)
  • Band saw or jigsaw
  • Orbital sander
  • Stationary belt or disc sander (optional, but very helpful)
  • Drill press and a 3/4″ dia. Forstner bit, or equivalent
  • Router with a 1/4″ rad. roundover bit and a 1/16″ rad. roundover bit (you can also sand edges, instead of using the 1/16” bit)
  • Trammel point set (to draw the base’s large circle shape)
  • Bar clamps, 12″ opening
  • Construction notes:

    If you’re struggling to figure out one more something to build for a gift, then here you go; learn how to make a paper towel holder. The only thing to watch for is drill bits drifting when you drill the holes. The best precaution to avoid this is to use an awl to carefully punch center points to help guide the bits as you start drilling the holes. Even so, drill slowly and watch carefully to be sure the bits don’t wander as you drill. Also, it’s essential to drill screw pilot holes in the ends of the center post (B) and stay bars (C) to avoid splitting the end grain when the screws are inserted.

    Step 1. Review this exploded view illustration to get a feel for the dispenser’s design and construction.

    cut list
    Glue–Base

    Step 2. Glue together 3 pieces to create a blank for the base (A). Doing this will make the base a more stable piece that is less likely to warp than if it were a one-piece construction.

    base detail

    Step 3. Layout the holes and circle shape on the base blank. Countersink and drill the screw holes, cut the circle shape, smooth the sawn edges, and then rout the 1/4″ rad. roundover edge.

    center post detail

    Step 4. Cut the center post (B) and stay bar (C) pieces to size. Lay out the center post finger hole and draw the radiused tops of all three pieces. Drill the center post finger hole.

    Rout–Roundover

    Step 5. Use a 1/16″ rad. roundover bit to round over the the edges of the finger hole. This bit may seem unnecessary, but once you have it, you will use it often. It does a super nice job of creating a precise tiny consistent eased-edge looking roundover.

    Alternatively, you can hand sand the edges of the finger hole to make them more finger friendly.

    Cut the rounded top ends of the center post and stay bars. Layout and drill screw pilot holes in the bottom ends of those pieces. Rout the 1/4″ rad. round over edges. Finish sand all the parts.

    Apply–Finish

    Step 6. Apply your favorite finish. I used wipe-on water based polyurethane. It’s fast and durable. Assemble the dispenser and adhere 4 door bumpers to the underside of the base. You’re done, with plenty of time left for gift-wrapping!

    If you’re looking for more ideas we have a wide variety of woodworking projects to choose from. We’ll keep you busy in the shop all year long so make sure to browse the options.

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    ]]> http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-paper-towel-holder/feed/ 6 Paper–Towel–Dispenser imgg cut list Glue–Base base detail center post detail Rout–Roundover Apply–Finish How to Make a Boot or Shoe Jack http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-boot-or-shoe-jack/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-boot-or-shoe-jack/#comments Tue, 08 Dec 2015 18:09:50 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=623517 Photos and Drawings by David Radtke Whether you’re removing tight fitting boots or slip on shoes, you’ll love the quick and easy mechanical advantage of this do-it-yourself boot jack. We’ve laid it all out for you so you can easily learn how to make a boot jack too. We also provide boot jack plans below... Read more »

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    Photos and Drawings by David Radtke

    Whether you’re removing tight fitting boots or slip on shoes, you’ll love the quick and easy mechanical advantage of this do-it-yourself boot jack. We’ve laid it all out for you so you can easily learn how to make a boot jack too. We also provide boot jack plans below so you can make it in no time!

    boot remove

    Here’s a home-made gift that anyone on your gift list would delight in. It’s designed to remove the most stubborn tight-fitting boots without bending over! You can make yours out of any hardwood scrap pieces. I used ¾” thick red oak for the top and a ¾” thick piece of walnut for the support foot.

    kerf cut setup

    Cut a piece of ¾” x 4-1/4” x 12-1/2” hardwood, then cut the traction kerfs.

    Hot glue a thin wood gauge to help you visually line up your saw blade with 15 marks starting two inches from the bottom and spaced every ¼”. Set your saw to cut 1/16” deep kerfs into the surface. I glued some sandpaper to the backside of the miter gauge to keep the wood from slipping as I pushed the workpiece through the blade.

    sanding kerfs

    Sand the edges of the kerfs with 150-grit sandpaper to keep them from chipping. Just ease the edges. You’ll want to retain a bit of an edge to act as a gripping surface for your shoe or sock. This added texture will make slipping your boots off a piece of cake.

    tapering with sled

    Cut the tapers on the sides of the blank with a sled, tapering jig or a bandsaw. Each side tapers about 5/8”.

    bootjack template

    Click here to download the templates.

    Print out the 2-page template and tape the halves together to get a full-size template so it looks like the image here. Trim and match the pages to fit your blank. I used 3-M spray adhesive to glue it to the wood blank to act as a guide while cutting the shapes. If you don’t have a printer, draw a grid on some thin plywood or MDF and then sketch the pattern using this drawing as a guide. The shape doesn’t have to be perfect to work.

    bandsaw template

    Use a band saw or a scroll saw to cut out the shapes at the top and bottom of the blank.

    drumsanding curve
    attach foot

    Cut the support foot from ¾” stock. The long side (toward the large cut-out) should be 1-3/4” and then beveled back at an 11-degree angle. I cut the bevel from longer stock on my table saw with the blade tilted and supported with the miter gauge. Drill two 3/8” holes ¾” deep then drill a pilot hole in each for the screws. Be careful not to drill all the way though! Assemble with screws and glue. Once the piece is assembled, give it a final sanding with 220-grit and apply a wipe-on oil finish.

    Now you know how to make a boot jack! As a great companion to this project, you may want to make a long handled shoe horn, too. Continue your learning in the shop by starting one of the many woodworking projects we have on our site. We can keep you busy measuring and cutting all year long.

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    ]]> http://www.wwgoa.com/article/how-to-make-a-boot-or-shoe-jack/feed/ 6 boot remove kerf cut setup sanding kerfs tapering with sled bootjack template bandsaw template drumsanding curve attach foot WWGOA Live Recap: December 2015 http://www.wwgoa.com/article/wwgoa-live-recap-december-2015/ http://www.wwgoa.com/article/wwgoa-live-recap-december-2015/#comments Wed, 02 Dec 2015 21:06:52 +0000 http://www.wwgoa.com/?p=623342 Finishing was the buzz word for our recent WWGOA Live. I suspect everyone is busy in Santa’s Workshop getting things ready for Christmas. Thanks for participating, and thanks for all the great questions.

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    Finishing was the buzz word for our recent WWGOA Live. I suspect everyone is busy in Santa’s Workshop getting things ready for Christmas. Thanks for participating, and thanks for all the great questions.

    The post WWGOA Live Recap: December 2015 appeared first on WoodWorkers Guild of America.

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    http://www.wwgoa.com/article/wwgoa-live-recap-december-2015/feed/ 88